What is real Hapkido?

Discussion in 'Hapkido' started by Dwi Chugi, Sep 22, 2012.

  1. Dwi Chugi

    Dwi Chugi Orange Belt

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    Hello all. After reading a lot of great threads here on martial talk I have decided to start my first thread.

    I have read several threads on what is true Hapkido vs hybrid Hapkido. I was going to call this "what is traditional Hapkido" but I am thinking that is too broad due to the fact each school has its own traditions. Anyways, I know it is said by Hapkidoin that Grandmaster Choi, learned aiki-jujitsu from Takeda Sensei in Japan for 30 years and was one of the only students of Takéda to learn all 3000 moves. GM Choi moved back to Korea in 1945 or 46 after being gone for 30 some odd years and starts teaching Yawara or Aiki-jujitsu. He later started calling his art Yu-Sul and it took several other names as well until the name was given to the art we so dearly love.

    Now, under the umbrella of Hapkido we have different federations and associations. Within the federations and associations we have different kwans or schools. There was only one Choi Dojunim. He had a lot of students that became masters who had lots of students that have become masters and so on. A lot has been added to the art.

    My linage goes Choi to Jung Hwan Park to Ron Berry to Me. Now, I have learned directly under Park, the majority of my Hapkido has come from Master Berry. I know there are people on this thread that are closer to Choi in linage then me and that is fine. I am proud of where I come from.

    Both my master and grandmaster have served in the special ops in conflicts around the world. I worked as a bouncer and as a body guard for different groups performing here in Daytona. My grandmaster and master's preform their Hapkido very simular. My Hapkido is a little different. I'm a lot taller with longer limbs than my masters and so I have to adapt my technique but my principles are the same as theirs. I have also taken into affect that even though the human body has not changed, how they use the body as a weapon has. Judo as we know it today, is the the same Judo in the 1950's or 60's. Taekwondo today has changed. Karate is not the same. Fighting is not the same.

    Master Park has admitted to adapting his Hapkido. Master Berry; I know has adapted his art, though his HKD looks more like GM Parks than mine. I have added techniques to my Hapkido and taken out the techniques that do not work as well now a days. I work on ground techniques because I am more likely to be attached by a wrestler or a BJJ fighter today than I would have been in yesteryear.

    I call what I do, "MuSool Hapkido" because I feel like I use the principles of Hapkido but I add other martial techniques "MuSool" into what I teach. How many other schools add/take way techniques? Has Hapkido changed over time? Is what some of us teaching really hapkido? I know it may not be Choi's Hapkido but is that ok? If its not ok, should we come up with a different name or the Kwan we teach enough?

    By the way, MuSool Hapkido is not a Kwan and is more of what I teach at my dojang because I know it works for me.

    I would like to keep this friendly. I'm just raising some questions that have been implied on this Forum.
     
  2. Doomx2001

    Doomx2001 Green Belt

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    Well, I take it that you may actually mean 'styles' instead of schools. In the case of styles, there many different styles of Hapkido with similar curriculum's but differ in execution of techniques, and how many techniques they teach.

    Also, individual schools within a said style may supplement their training with something they feel complements Hapkido. For example: A teacher may incorparate Tai Chi 'feeling' exercises in Hapkido as a way to help his students to feel when their attacker pushes or pulls. Other instructors for example, may do the opposite, and instead of adding to the curriculum, they may instead take out techniques that they deem impractical.


    Well, for one thing, alot has actually been added to Hapkido. Ji Han Jae added high kicks, and spin kicks to Hapkido as well as some Ki Exercises (which they're may have been ki exercises taught by GM Choi, but I don't know for sure).
    It is through Ji Han Jae's Hapkido lineage that most people are actually learning. I would say that it makes up of 60% of Hapkido schools. They all trace back to Ji Han Jae's version of Hapkido.

    The other additions to Hapkido come from two sets of brothers. First, In Hyuk Suh and In Sun Seo. Second, Joo Bang Lee and his brother Joo Sang Lee. These four people along with a few unknown others developed what is called Kuk Sool (National Skill or National Art).
    In Hyuk Suh is said to have studied kung fu. What style people don't seem to sure on, it could be Taiji Mantis or Sip Pal Gi (18 methods). The story goes that because GM Choi was so expensive to train under that In Sun Seo would train in Hapkido (he got a 3rd dan or gup under Choi) and In Hyuk Suh would study kung fu. At the end of the day, the brothers would train together exchanging what they had learned. We know that Joo Bang Lee studied with GM Choi for a time, but I don't know how long. But these Masters all trained together, and knew each other in martial art circles of the time.

    So these men developed Kuk Sool, but as it usually goes with martial arts, they were divided on things, and went their separate way. In Hyuk Suh ended up with Kuk Sool Won which is mix of Ji Han Jae's version of Hapkido and Kung fu. Joo Bang Lee on the other hand founded Hwarang Do, which is very similar to Kuk Sool Won, but things differ here and there in the Hwarang Do curriculum. These two styles are also among the first to incorparte forms or hyung into Hapkido with the exception of the World Hapkido Federation. Kuk Sool also incorparates a larger number of weapons and weapon techniques.
    The two Hapkido like styles (Kuk Sool Won and HwarangDo) are similar just as Uechi ryu and Gojo ryu similar to one another. Or maybe how Chen Taiji quan and Yang Taiji quan relate to one another but are different. Kuk Sool related schools probably make up about 40% or more of the Hapkido schools you will encounter.

    Finally the last group of Hapkido would be the die hard traditionalist (which all Hapkido for the most part is traditional). What I mean is Orthodox Hapkido. The Hapkido that GM Choi Yong Sul taught. There are at least 3 groups that teach GM Choi's Hapkido to my knowledge and they are: Jungki Kwan, Yong Sul Kwan Hapkiyusul, and Rim's Hapkido Association. Of course I've not trained in neither of these three, but I have seen videos, and they are very similar with the exception of Hapkiyusul where the grandmaster there teaches pure Hapki (Aiki) techniques at a certain level. All these schools I've metioned make up about 3% of the Hapkido schools out there.

    But, back to the origianl point, yes, Hapkido continues to change and evolve with the exception of the orthodox Hapkido schools (and thats not a bad thing). Both in Korea and in the Western world.

    One quick example of this is: GM Choi's Hapkido, then high level kicks are added creating Sin Moo Hapkido, then kung fu and forms are added to create Hwarang Do, and then Hapkido morphs again creating Farang Mu Sul by adding ground work, trapping, and few other things.

    I would say overall yes. Essentially, in my mind, real Hapkido employs joint locks, hand strikes, and kicks (waist level and below). Also, I would note that Ki Exercise, and meditaion are a important part of Hapkido (although I'm not sure if the founder taught the two). I think forms can play a positive roll, but are not neccessary.

    But if what your asking is what most people practice is Choi's Hapkido, well, I think the techniques look identical, but in the end Choi's Hapkido opperates on principles missing from other Hapkido styles. The reason for this is he ran a tough class, and he was expensive. Because of this, many students would at the most make black belt, some would get their 3rd gup black belt. But that is pretty much it. Many of Gm Choi's lower rank black belts went on to found their own Hapkido styles/schools without the full knowledge of the art.

    One quick example of this is the founder of Yong Sul Kwan Hapkiyusul (Kim Yoon-Sang) began his study of Hapkido in the early 1960s under Master Chang Gedo, eventually reaching a grade of 5th Dan within the Korea Hapkido Association.
    GM Kim wanted to learn more, so he sought out GM Choi.
    When Kim arrived at Choi Yong Sul's Dojang he was asked to describe what training experience he had. He replied confidently that he had a 5th Dan in Hapkido. So Choi told him to put on his uniform and try what he new. Choi told him to try with a high school student who was there. He was not able to move Choi's young student.

    Choi told him to give him his black belt and than made him wear a white belt.

    Anyway, not many people stayed with GM Choi to learn the true essence of Hapkido. These men went on to found their own styles, in some cases, doing 'sloppy' hapkido - watering down what Choi taught. At any rate, regardless of the style, for the most part, were all learning Hapkido, just not orthodox Hapkido.

    Yeah, I think it is ok. In fact, I think that it is a good thing that there are so many styles of Hapkido. Becasue, it gives us options of what kind of Hapkido would like to study. If you want more straight forward, non-flashy Hapkido, I would say go with Jungki Kwan. If you want a curriculum that has a little bit everything, then Kuk Sool might be your cup of tea. Or maybe you really want something that has kicks similar to TaeKwondo but with Hapkido self defense, then maybe Sin Moo Hapkido is the way to go. (By the way, these are just quick comparisons of these, so please don't anyone get offended).
    The point is, because there is so much variety, there is something for everyone. The only thing I think people should consider is that we should also preserve GM Choi's Hapkido so it can be passed on to future generations. As long as that is being done, then all these different styles is a good thing.

    And as for coming up with a different name for Hapkido should it not stay true to GM Choi's Hapkido, some people have already done that. I think what it comes down too, is that, regardless of the Hapkido style you study, put all your heart into it, learn all you can from your instuctor, learn from other instructors & even white belts for they can teach you something from time to time, experiment with techniques, and always keep an open mind.

    Anyway, this post is full of facts and OPINIONS, so take it for what is worth. I hope I have been helpful, and maybe helped a little in your research. :)


    - Brian
     
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  3. zDom

    zDom Senior Master

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    Good posts.

    I appreciate that some are trying to preserve "Choi's hapkido."

    We are doing the same here at Moo Sul Kwan with "Lee H. Park's hapkido" (based on Won Kwang-wha's Musulkwan hapkido — also the source of the hapkido style of Dr. Kimm's hapkido).

    I would post on what I think is "real hapkido" but I don't have the time at them moment to craft a carefully-worded opinion.

    (I keep running into the consequences of posting anything less)
     
  4. Dwi Chugi

    Dwi Chugi Orange Belt

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    Thank you Brian and Scott for your imputs and I value everyone that has something to offer.
     
  5. Kong Soo Do

    Kong Soo Do IKSDA Director

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    I think it is important to add that real Hapkido comes from real DRAJJ. The principles of these, and other arts can trace their lineage back quite a ways. I've often opined that Hapkido, Aiki Jujutsu, Chin Na and other arts may have subtle nuances but effectually the principles and techniques are functionally the same in the conclusion. One group or another, within any of these labels, may claim ownership of the art, or purist lineage etc, but from the perspective of SD, which these arts are based upon, the proof is going to be in the pudding so-to-speak. If it really works, on real bad guys in real situations then it is real Hapkido (or AJJ or Chin Na or whatever).
     
  6. iron_ox

    iron_ox Black Belt

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    Hapkido is the Art of Choi Dojunim, many of his students added things that might or might not actually be part of the principles. The vast majority of these students were low or medium ranked that never learned the entire curriculum.

    Hapkido seems to be unique in that we use a ranking system that many people simply ignore. Choi Dojunim ranked 4 men to 9th dan, and yet how many make that claim, or rank to 10th dan even.

    "Real" Shotokan is the art of Funakoshi Sensei, when you say you study Shotokan, people know what you mean. If however, your instructor is a 3rd Dan Shotokan, and he ranks you to 9th dan Shotokan, it would be seen as suspect - yet this happens in Hapkido all the time and people blinker their eyes and pretend the rank has value.

    The main issue is that these low and mid ranked students do not know all the curriculum....as such, they are often not actually passing on Hapkido at all. And it is amazing that people say they have a connection back to Choi Dojunim - EVERYONE doing Hapkido has a connection to Choi Dojunim, but the reality is that the connection may only be a passing one as the instructors might actually have low rank, and may be issuing rank far higher than their own rank.
     
  7. iron_ox

    iron_ox Black Belt

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    I have to agree that good technique is good technique, but because it works does not make it good Hapkido. Hapkido is actually unique is some ways compared to say Chin Na, so I would have to say that the Art of Choi Dojunim is "Real Hapkido" - but in a life or death situation, hopefully you have been taught good technique - Hapkido would qualify, but so would other arts.
     
  8. iron_ox

    iron_ox Black Belt

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    This is a very good post, and I want Brian to know I am not making a critique of the information, but some corrections to some of the information, as well as a perspective of someone that has been involved with the Choi Dojunim root of the art for more than 30 years.

    And, um, it may make me "arrogant and closed minded" - but after 30+ years, I hope I am able to educate/discuss things with those that choose to do so.


    Hapkido is a single style - the style of Choi Dojunim, other than that, there are variants - some better, some worse.

    While I feel that anyone can add what they want, If someone feels they need to "add" to Hapkido it makes sense that they learn the entire curriculum. If they choose to not do that, it would make sense to give what they do a different name.




    Ji never learned the entire curriculum from Choi Dojunim, and adding the material he did is not compatible with the principles of the art of Choi Dojunim. Ji did however rename what he does, calling it Sin Moo, so its easy to know he is teaching a varient of Hapkido and not the original art.

    According to the Founders of Kuk Sool and HwarangDo they are not Hapkido, but since in recent years they have both tried to connect themselves to Choi Dojunim the reality of their training should be more open. Suh In Hyuk never trained in Hapkido, and his brother Seo In Sun got a first dan from Choi Dojunim's Dojang (which means he most likey actually trained with an instructor of Choi Dojunim's). Now that there has been an issue between the brothers, Seo In Sun is now claiming a 10th Dan in Hapkido - after 4 decades of claiming he had no rank in Hapkido.

    Joo Bang Lee is making many claims about his connection Choi Dojunim, but according to many that I have spoken to in Daegu that trained with Choi Dojunim for decades, the Lee brothers never trained directly with Choi Dojunim except in seminars in Seoul. However, there is a training history between the Lee bothers and Suh/Seo coming from the same training background, which may have had some exposure to Choi Dojunim, but certainly not what they claim on their respective sites.

    Two of the instructors are 9th dans from Choi Dojunim, Grandmaster Lim Hyun Soo and Grandmaster Kim Yun Sang. The Third is a 7th Dan from Choi Dojunim, Master Rim Jung Bae in Maryland; there is also Master Chung Kee Tae (7th Dan) In Ontario; Master Jung Hwan Park (6th dan), Florida; and of course Chang Chin Il Dojunim (9th Dan), current head of Hapkido, living in New York.

    But, back to the origianl point, yes, Hapkido continues to change and evolve with the exception of the orthodox Hapkido schools (and thats not a bad thing). Both in Korea and in the Western world.

    The Founder only died in 1986 - not much eveloution is really necessary...IMHO.

    Well noted, but according to many that trained with Choi Dojunim, he often charged what he thought someone could afford, but a good point.

    Nice point.

    Hmmmm....maybe in parts....



    Again nice point, I would have preferred if those that did not actually have the entire curriculum just give their material a different name.

    Great post Brian. It is good that people are starting to research Choi Dojunim and his art, it will lead to greater understanding and training in Hapkido.
     
  9. Doomx2001

    Doomx2001 Green Belt

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    My only two things to add to what you said would be this: When I say most people learn and trace Hapkido to Ji Han Jae, I'm saying most people are practicing Ji Han Jae's version of Hapkido. And I agree that the kicks he and his peers added to Hapkido goes against the original 'spirit' of Hapkido, which is efficiency, being practical.
    Thats why I said in my post that probably less the 10% practice Choi's Hapkido.

    The other quick point or explanation I was wanting to say is that I probably have been choosing the use of the word 'evolution' poorly. Evolution suggests a improvement on a species making it more easily to survive. But, as it relates to Hapkido, I have been using the word evolution when I should have used 'change' or 'alter'. That was what I was intending in the first place, my bad. That was a brain fart on my part. :)
     
  10. bushido

    bushido Yellow Belt

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    Hmmm...
    Sorry for posting on so many of these threads guys...just started looking through the posts and picking a few here and there to add to or comment on...
    Given that, lol

    this is a loaded question really...
    Our founder was a governmental assassin who had a pig farm as a cover...
    My subumnim is 3rd gen HKD'ist, Korean born citizen. I place a lot of faith in the history that I have been passed or have learned.

    And here, we are only passing gas, because none of us was there...so, that said...
    I was taught that as a HKD'ist, we are thieves. We steal from that that works. We have nothing new, we have nothing unique. If it works in combat, if we can explain it in science, and if it compliments the way we move, we steal it...if not, we discard it.

    What is HKD?
    A practical and scientific approach to combat.
    We use Grey's anatomy to teach the body...an Orange belt must be able to name every bone in the body, trace the main arteries, and hit 20 pressure points within 30 seconds starting with the finger tips and working up the arm...

    What is "Real" HKD? I don't know...
    I gave up a long time ago trying to sort out the political and in house fractures...I don't even debate them any more.

    If it works for you, if it fills the empty void you have...than it is real!

    Every one here has experienced the HKD phenomenon...what more are you looking for?
    [h=3][/h]
     
  11. iron_ox

    iron_ox Black Belt

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    I assume this is in jest. There is not any real proof Choi Dojunim was ever an assassin, he MIGHT have worked to round up deserters during WWII, but that has never been proven either, and he was certainly not working as a pig farmer as a cover, but rather to feed his family.

    While we may not have been there, there are plenty still alive who were, and what they have to say should finally be taken into account.


    Here I am going to completely disagree. What Choi Dojunim taught on the Korean Peninsula was radically unique - nothing like it was being taught there at all. Hapkido is not a random collection of stuff cobbled together. While Choi Dojunim made some revisions to what he taught over the years, he was very consistent in his technical expectations of his students. What he taught was SO unique in fact it spawned a multitude of other "arts" and sub-variants. Hapkido has no need to "steal" from anything else, and while I mean NO disrespect at all, if you are being taught that is does, this is incorrect.

    Don't know about scientific, but Choi Dojunim's material is certainly practical.

    While you don't have to debate the merits of the various groups, you should be aware of them, and their relationship to Choi Dojunim. There is no Hapkido without him - and there is no other that can claim to have added to his curriculum that learned the entire thing. Having spoken to men that earned 8th and 9th dans from Choi Dojunim, they felt no compelling need to "add" anything....

    If something works for someone, that's AWESOME! But is it Hapkido? Well, only if it is Hapkido.

    Nice post, keep them coming to stimulate discussion!
     
  12. bushido

    bushido Yellow Belt

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    lol, I'll try to keep it interesting ;)

    "I assume this is in jest. There is not any real proof Choi Dojunim was ever an assassin"

    Now, I never knew or met Mister Choi...But, I certainly know a man who was trained by him...and that is the history as I was told it.
    Is it true...I don't know, but I trust the source enough to think that it might be...and enough to know that it may just be part of his flair for drama, lol

    As for being thieves...there is very little in HKD that is original. The joint breaks are not ours, the throws were assimilated from existing styles, hand strikes are from various sources. The internal aspects were not invented by Choi either, and certainly not the discovery of pressure points.
    About the only unique styling we have is the way we kick. You might argue about the throws, buy all that was really done, was that we applied our foot work to an existing style.
    The introduction of the cane was original as far as I know though.
    We all take great pride in HKD...so please do not take me wrong in saying any of this Kevin. Choi did what he did, and he did it well, and we each have prospered from it. But it is the end product that is unique, not the individual pieces. I had a BB in Yudo long before HKD...I knew all the throws and then some when I started training, and better than my teachers...I just had different foot work. Some forms of HKD that I have seen use linear strikes, some circular...but none of them are unique in any way.
    No, we are truly thieves...but on this, I doubt if either of us is going to alter the belief of the other ;)

    "If something works for someone, that's AWESOME! But is it Hapkido? Well, only if it is Hapkido."

    True enough...But, Choi did make changes...I will dig out some early footage and you can compare them to his HKD in the late 70's and early 80's...some is similar, some smoother, some different. He did not wake up one day with HKD. It was a concept, it got reorganized, refined, added to and subtracted from until he had what he wanted. Then it became consistant.

    At any rate, none of this is to be rude or any thing else...I respect all who have gone before me, and certainly Choi Dojunim. I am just expressing an opinion, and we all know what they are worth ;)
     
  13. Dwi Chugi

    Dwi Chugi Orange Belt

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    Hello Bushido and welcome to Martialtalk, it is great to have you and your opinions on the art that we love.

    I do not believe that you posted anything rude and Martialtalk is an opinion based forum so you will find many of them on here, mine included. Take them as what they are, opinions and ideals of others that have the same passion for this great art as you. Martial Arts is like a religion and Hapkido a sub-religion. Everyone thinks theirs is better and are willing to go to war over it.

    I believe Doomx2001 had a great response on people's vision on what is real or true Hapkido in his above post. As Doomx2001 points out, there are some Orthodox Hapkido Kwans that believe they teach a un-touched version of Hapkido that the founder, Grandmaster Choi instructed. There are some kwans that follow Ji's Sin Moo Hapkido. And there are some styles that follow this master's or that master's system or kwan of Hapkido. Some of the Kwans are good; some, well they do not do the name "Hapkido" any justice.

    I believe the term Hapkido has became a generic name (like Jujitsu or Karate) because the forefathers did very little to ensure that Hapkido stayed united. Hapkido is used quite a bit and can not be copyrighted because of the fact that so many people use it. It would be like copyrighting the term "coffee". You can copyright "Starbucks Coffee" but not the term "coffee" itself. It is kind of a mess, really. My hat is off to the Orthodox Hapkidoin like Master Sogor and the kwan he belongs too, Jungki Kwan Hapkido. I think they are doing a great job passing on the tradition that Master Choi would want. I believe Orthodox Hapkido works great, otherwise it would not have been around for so long and Choi would not have used it so successfully against other Martial Artist.

    I think Mr. Sogor's above post make some great points in the fact that Master Choi was a pig farmer to feed his family. I have never heard of him being an assassin, actually, I heard he was a bodyguard. I did read that he worked with Takeda in hunting down and capturing Japanese WWII deserters; but killing them, I have never heard.

    As you pointed out, we were not there to hear Master Choi's version or his take on his own life or even Hapkido. There is a video or two but the quality is poor and Master Choi spoke with a heavy Japanese accent. Master Sogor has a point that there are plenty of Masters still alive that were there. I take this with a grain of salt as well. Sometimes things get inflated and mixed up over time. Sometimes on purpose, sometimes to feed ones own ego. I think some master's have a better grip on that sort of stuff then other masters do. I think Master Sogor would agree with me on this.

    I think "today's" Hapkido can be broken down like this:
    True Orthodox Traditional Hapkido instructed, as believed by the master, just like Grandmaster Choi taught.
    Traditional Hapkido with outside techniques that has influinces based on True Hapki Theories as believed by that master.
    Traditional Hapkido with outside influinces that has some techiques based on True Hapki Theories and some non-True Hapki Techniques.
    Non-Traditional Hoshinsool (self-defense) techniques that work not based on Hapki Theories but they like the name Hapkido.
    And the people that have not a clue what Hapkido is but they think Hapkido is a cool name.

    Here is my belief on my system of Hapkido:
    My master's, I believed, shared with me about 95% true real Orthodox Hapkido. My grandmaster was also a black belt in Judo and a grandmaster in Taekwondo so I am pretty sure some of the Judo rubbed off. Both my Grandmaster and Master never mixed Taekwondo kicks or strikes into the Hapkido classes though.

    I would go and say that I teach 90% true Orthodox Hapkido to my students. At the lower levels I start them off with more Yusool "lever" type of techniques based on some Hapki Theories because it is a lot easier to learn than true straight up Hapkido. After I know they would be safe in a true street encounter, I then start sharing with them the inter-workings of what I believe is true Hapkido that was passed down from Master Choi to Master Park (to me at times) or to Master Berry to me.

    I added the term "MuSool" which means "Martial Technique" in front of my Hapkido name. This is because the name of my dojang is "MuSool Academy" and I teach Hapkido with some other Hapki theory based martial technique in my Hapkido school. I did not invent a new style by any means.

    Anyways; Bushido, that is my two cents and once again, welcome aboard.
     
  14. bushido

    bushido Yellow Belt

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    Hi Shelby, thanks for the warm welcome, I appreciate it :)
    Nice summary of HKD as it is now a days. I know personally, that that my style of HKD is not a purists version of Choi's teachings...I know it and that is fine for me. But we are HapKiDo none the less :)
    I think we would fall into your second catagory...
     
  15. Dwi Chugi

    Dwi Chugi Orange Belt

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    Hello Bushido, no problem. I know we love to hear new ideas on theories. Even though we all do not agree on Hapkido theories at times, I think we all respect each other enough to listen to each other's ideas.

    I would say 95% of all Hapkido is either in the 2nd or 3rd catagory. Two percent would be your Orthodox Hapkido and and 3% of people that think Hapkido is a cool name so lets call our style that. That is by no means scientific.

    I would say I would fall into the second catagory as well, but I do teach a non-Hapkido theory based technique from time to time.

    Where are you from? Are you an instructor?
     
  16. bushido

    bushido Yellow Belt

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    I am from Ontario, Canada.
    At the present, no, I do not teach...not for over a year now. Closed the gym, our web site is down now too. My main reason for teaching was always to provide a variety of bodies for my 2 youngin's to advance. Now one is 21, the other 19. I started them when they were 6 and 5 respectivly, and I feel I have prepared them as far as possible, so my role is done ;) I still have a full gym at home for them to work out or if I ever want to train with some one. As for making money, there are easier ways to make more than operating an independant club. It can be a hard business if it were to be your sole source of income...HKD hurts, it's hard to keep good numbers to pay the bills, lol
     
  17. Dwi Chugi

    Dwi Chugi Orange Belt

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    Your Hapkido hurts!? Well, that means you are doing something right. Lol.

    I agree we are not selling icecream or hamburgers but blood, sweat, tears and lots of pain.

    I run a full time school but 70% of my students are Taekwondo. The 30% Hapkido don't put a dent into my income to operate the Dojang.

    I believe you taught for noble reasons raising your children in your Hapkido. My oldest trains Taekwondo full time and we are starting our first under teen HKD class in January for 8 to 12 year olds so I guess he will start Hapkido training then.

    I am in Port Orange FL about 10 miles south of Daytona Beach. If you are ever down this way please look me up.
     
  18. bushido

    bushido Yellow Belt

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    Right on, thanks for the invite :)
    If I ever do the bike week thing or Disney World again, I'll get in touch :D
     
  19. rd8256

    rd8256 White Belt

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    Hi, is there such a thing as real hapkido ? Hapkido is a fairly new art comprised of different arts blended together, it's a sort of mix martial art, choi dojunim had help in formulating the art from its conception. There's many schools because no one wanted to accept chinil changs promotion as dojunim. So unless you've studied under Chang then your hapkido is not from the founder choi
     
  20. iron_ox

    iron_ox Black Belt

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    Clearly you have no idea what you are talking about as this entire post is misleading and factually incorrect.123
     

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