Well, What's Next?

Discussion in 'General Martial Arts Talk' started by Nomad, Sep 22, 2011.

  1. Nomad

    Nomad Master Black Belt

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    A little background. I have been training in Japanese karate with one school for the past 10 years (reaching Nidan). Recently, I decided that it was time to part ways, as my training goals aren't well aligned with theirs anymore.

    My martial arts journey is not over. So the question is, what next?

    If anyone knows great instructors in any martial art style with a bias towards practical self-defense in San Diego, I'd love to get some recommendations. It's time to try and fill in some gaps in my training. Ideally, I'd like something I can use to improve my understanding of my karate base and kata applications by taking a different approach than what I've been doing for the last decade.

    If you don't know individual instructors, what styles would you recommend that I look into? I'm not sure at the moment that I really know exactly what I'm looking for, but I do think I'll know when I find it.
     
  2. Cyriacus

    Cyriacus Senior Master

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    Which Style of Karate had you Trained it?
    Assuming it didnt just say "Japanese" :p
     
  3. Nomad

    Nomad Master Black Belt

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    It was an offshoot of Shotokan, with some other stuff added in.
     
  4. blindsage

    blindsage Master of Arts

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    You might try Goju Ryu if you still want to train karate but want something a little different.
    http://www.bushikan.com/
    http://www.gojukaratecenter.com/

    If you want to branch out a little from Shotokan, but get a little more contact training you could try Kyokushinkai Karate or one of it's branch styles: Ashihara, Enshin, World Oyama, etc.
    http://www.kyokushinus.com/
    http://www.dojoamericana.com/kyokushin.html (this will work for the next category too)


    If you want the full contact sparring but less karate, you could go for Muay Thai, Sanda/Sanshou, or most MMA schools. MMA schools would have the added element of grappling, generally ground oriented.
    http://sandiegofitnessmartialarts.com/home
    http://www.americanboxing.net/
    http://kickboxingsandiego.com/
    http://www.thearenamma.com/


    If you want to look at a style that mainly focus on self-defense you could try Krav Maga.
    http://www.kravmagasd.com/

    You might try Chinese internal arts if you want to explore the depths of forms for defense, Xingyiquan, Baguazhang, Taijiquan, or Liu He Ba Fa, but be especially discerning about the instructor. A good teacher would teach any of these for self-defense. The same would be good if you want to look into softness and fluidity. Systema would be good for that as well.
    http://www.sandiegohsing-i.com/
    http://sandiegokungfutaichi-com.doodlekit.com/home/bagua_zhang
    http://www.sdpakua.com/
    http://www.taoistsanctuary.org/
    http://www.taichihealthways.com/
    http://www.taichiboxing.com/

    http://sandiegosystema.com/
    http://russiansystema.net/
     
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  5. oftheherd1

    oftheherd1 Senior Master

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    Given your rank and past commitment, I would suggest Aikido, or Hapkido if you don't mind straying from Japanese arts. Why go to another Karate? You have done that, and mastered a lot of it. Why not now try something that shows defenses against what you have learned so far. Acquiring a BB in Aikido, you may find a new appreciation for your Karate and wish to return, or you may be able to use your Karate background to great advantage in further study of Aikido.

    I am not able to recommend any schools in your area, but if you are there, you are better able to evaluate them based on your preferences anyway.
     
  6. Cyriacus

    Cyriacus Senior Master

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    Aikido perhaps?

    Or a Full Weapon Art, to complement your Unarmed Art?

    Kickboxing?
     
  7. Brian R. VanCise

    Brian R. VanCise MT Moderator Staff Member

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    Since you have striking experience maybe try some thing outside of that scope.

    Like BJJ, Judo or maybe a dive into the Filipino Martial Arts. Just a thought!
     
  8. SuperFLY

    SuperFLY Green Belt

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    i agree.

    something like BJJ, Judo or Aikido will definitely help compliment your existing skills.

    my aikido has helped my bunkai no end :)
     
  9. Carol

    Carol Crazy like a...

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    Have you thought about the FMAs? Very practical, and it is a great way to add weapons training that focus directly on weapons you would find and use today. You will also get an opportunity to use that training in multiple ranges, including the ground if the school teaches dumog.
     
  10. punisher73

    punisher73 Senior Master

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    Very open ended question. Really, it depends on what your goals are next for your journey. Once you have that narrowed down it would be easier to suggest something because as of right now the answers are "everything".
     
  11. Nomad

    Nomad Master Black Belt

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    Yes, yes it was ;)

    At the moment, I'm leaning towards programs that don't have a lot of kids involved, as I think the training dynamic necessarily changes when younger teens are in the same class. I think something outside the karate umbrella would be more useful to me than simply switching styles, but that could change if I found someone nearby teaching practical, realistic applications for kata with a good class dynamic.

    Coming from somewhere that did no contact sparring, I'm also looking for more contact, but not necessarily in a competitive sparring context (if that makes any sense whatsoever).

    I've dabbled a little in other arts in the past, and while the very limited BJJ I've done was an interesting challenge and a great workout, it didn't really strike a chord for me. I've definitely thought about FMA, Krav Maga or Systema as possibilities, but need to try them on to see if they would fit.

    Thanks for the replies so far (especially to blindsage, who came up with a bunch of links for local places I've not run across in my own searches!), and please keep them coming!
     
  12. Flying Crane

    Flying Crane Sr. Grandmaster

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    You mentioned looking for something to fill in the gaps. What do you perceive as the gaps?

    If you feel the training that you've received was good, and you would like to delve deeper into it, I would suggest you look for a way to tap into the roots of what you've already done. Look at a good traditional Okinawan school, or look for Fukienese White Crane, which I believe heavily influenced the Okinawan methods. Taking that route might really improve your understanding of what you have already learned.
     
  13. harlan

    harlan 2nd Black Belt

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    And then there is Tai Chi. I hear that there is some good Chen style in San Diego. :)
     
  14. just2kicku

    just2kicku Black Belt

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    Theres a few Kajukenbo schools in S.D. If you want contact
     
  15. Nomad

    Nomad Master Black Belt

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    Ok, I've arranged to drop in for a Krav Maga class tonight and a Systema class on Thursday at a couple of different places to get a feel for the class formats and dynamics. We'll see how they go.
     
  16. Cyriacus

    Cyriacus Senior Master

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    I for one would like to know how that Pans out :)
     
  17. David43515

    David43515 Master Black Belt

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    I did a branch of Southern Shaolin kung fu for years, then swithed to Isshin Ryu Karate, and then when I tried some FMA and Silat it really opened my eyes to alot of new ways to apply what I`d already been doing for years. That might be something to look into.
     
  18. Blindside

    Blindside Senior Master

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    Well, for me FMA answered alot of questions about why I did alot of things the way I did them in Karate and Kenpo, and of the FMA I really like Pekiti. PTK Global Organization lists this instructor in San Diego.

    Jeremy Heath

    760-270-2495

    jtheathus@yahoo.com
     
  19. Nomad

    Nomad Master Black Belt

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    I'll be happy to share my impressions. The Krav Maga class was fun. It's operating out of the back of a warehouse with the garage doors open (they do have another location across town that's in a more traditional setting). The same center also offers BJJ, a karate program & Crossfit training. The instructor was knowledgeable, had an extensive background that included several years of Shotokan karate under Nishiyama, and is an instructor at both locations. The students were a decent mix of M/F, with a few beginners and some others that had obviously been doing this for longer.

    The class started with a typical warmup, went on to review several basic self-defense techniques vs. someone trying to choke you from the front (really dumb attack, IMO, but it does happen occasionally) and escapes from a headlock, then went into partner pad work with some combinations. Basic techniques had minor variations, such as slightly different hand positions for guard, vertical punches, and so on, but nothing too mind boggling ;)

    A minor irritation was that there was only one partner change for the entire hour class; I'd have liked to have a chance to meet and work with other members of the class.

    I let them know that I wasn't quite ready to jump into a relationship and that I needed to check out a few other programs before making a commitment, and they were fine with that.

    Definitely a positive experience, but this brings up another question which seems pretty fundamental; how, exactly, do you know when/if you've found a good place with a good fit? It's certainly likely to take way more than a single trial class to determine this. I have found that I can often quickly decide that someplace is not going to be for me based on a single class or even a quick conversation, but the reverse doesn't seem to be true.

    Thanks for this; I contacted him and it looks like I have another date ;) for Friday.
     
  20. Blindside

    Blindside Senior Master

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    So sign up for a month and if you don't like it, walk on. For a beginner I would say three months, but you know (or think you know) what you are looking for, you should be able to make that determination with adequate input after a month.123
     

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