Hapkido schools a dying breed?

Discussion in 'Hapkido' started by Alan Smithee, Nov 23, 2019.

  1. gpseymour

    gpseymour MT Moderator Staff Member

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  2. vince1

    vince1 Orange Belt

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    Do you have video footage of this that you could share with us?
     
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  3. vince1

    vince1 Orange Belt

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    We have at least 5 Hapkido schools in my part of the country. Some of the TaeKwonDo schools in my area have even reached out to my Aikijuijitsu teacher for student instruction. I have a friend who teaches Hapkido a few hours away from my home as part of his TaeKwonDo school. Some of his technique are definitely not as good as an Aikijuijitsu practioner.
     
  4. Alan Smithee

    Alan Smithee Blue Belt

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    No, strange that i didn't have TMZ around. .
     
  5. Flying Crane

    Flying Crane Sr. Grandmaster

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    Hmm. Go figure...

     
  6. Alan Smithee

    Alan Smithee Blue Belt

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    you equate street fights with school publicity? It was in 2008 for that matter
     
  7. dvcochran

    dvcochran Senior Master

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    Please do not entice the trolls!!!
     
  8. Flying Crane

    Flying Crane Sr. Grandmaster

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    Where did you come up with that?
     
  9. vince1

    vince1 Orange Belt

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    Then it didn't happen.
     
  10. skribs

    skribs Senior Master

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    Except when I'm doing that V-Lock, I'll do a lot more than just stand there and twist his wrist.

    I'm using my feet to put me into a position with good leverage. When I twist his arm, I push my bicep into his elbow in order to apply extra pressure. If he shifts his weight and turns into the lock to loosen it, I'll change direction and go with that energy to straighten his arm out. Typically they'll resist again by pulling their arm back in, which sets me up perfect for a Figure-4.

    I can do this, because I've trained for years to apply the techniques correctly, and how to read my opponent's resistance to the technique so I can adjust what I'm doing based on their resistance.

    This is all from my Hapkido training. We learn the basic technique (what the aikido guy does in the video), how to make it work (what the BJJ guy is doing), and what to do when it fails. Unfortunately this process typically doesn't make it to Youtube.

    Students at my school are pretty stubborn about going down and when to tap out. So you learn how to make the techniques actually work.
     
  11. drop bear

    drop bear Sr. Grandmaster

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    The thing is there are not many people who can make wrist locks work. And I mean people who are really dangerous with them.

    But there are a lot of people who say they can.

    I think for people to be wrist lock guys they really have to be able to do them consistently live and on command. And so we should be able to see a video of it somewhere.

    Basically like a Danaher guy saying he can do a leg lock. It comes from them leg locking everyone. Then you are a leg lock guy.



    If people are going to be these wrist lock guys they have to go out and wrist lock people.
     
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  12. gpseymour

    gpseymour MT Moderator Staff Member

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    I think the reality of wrist locks is that it takes a really high skill level to do them on command (with someone resisting , who knows what they’re doing). For most folks, the skill to develop is recognizing when the wrist lock becomes available. That makes them reliable when you go for them, though that’s not going to be as often as other moves.
     
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  13. skribs

    skribs Senior Master

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    I think another big part of the problem is that most techniques fail. This applies to all martial arts. Most techniques you use in a fight will fail. How many punches does a boxer miss? How many punches does a boxer land that don't KO the opponent? How many take-downs does a wrestler get sprawled on? How many times does a wrestler take someone down and not pin them? How many submission attempts are abandoned in a BJJ match because the opponent was able to defend it?

    Wristlocks are the same. If I'm going for a V-Lock, I assume there's about a 20% chance I will take them down with the V-Lock. They may try and pull against it, in which case I'll change direction and go for an armbar takedown. They may use their footwork to "unwind" the lock, in which case I'll follow through and pull their elbow down on my shoulder. In both cases, there's other ways they may resist, and I have techniques I will transition into. So my V-Lock may fail, but I may end up with a shoulder lock, a figure-4, a chicken wing, or a hip toss. All that started from the V-Lock.
     
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