Hapkido Hand Strikes: Neglected?

Discussion in 'Hapkido' started by Doomx2001, Jan 27, 2013.

  1. Kong Soo Do

    Kong Soo Do IKSDA Director

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    Good way to put it. It makes an excellent lead in to something beyond just the initial strike. This will give Hapkidoin options in the force continuum that other arts may not provide.

    This makes sense as long as the art in question has material after the first Dan. I don't consider (in the case of some arts) additional forms that are just reworks of the same movements as 'advanced' material. It will all be relevent to the art in question and more specifically the the school in many/most cases. The problem creeps up though when a person claims BB status. As the example above about the 4th Dan shows, it just doesn't always mean what you may think it means. In the example I gave in another thread, one TKD school was offering, through a Korean Hapkido GM, a HKD BB in just one weekend seminar with no prior HKD experience. So the HKD BB we run into (or any BB in any art for that matter)...are they a legit Dan holder that knows the material and has sweat equity in the art....or did they get it after a weekend for another piece of wall candy?

    If someone makes a BB in one year, and they KNOW the material (whatever material was required) then thumbs up. And if they have more material after first Dan to strive for, and additional thumbs up.
     
  2. Instructor

    Instructor Master Black Belt

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    I feel a Hapkidoin with a year of training from a reputable school (regardless of belt rank) is a reasonably skilled fighter. They would do well against untrained attackers. But real ability in this art takes time, I've been at it for decades and I still learn something new every practice.
     
  3. Dwi Chugi

    Dwi Chugi Orange Belt

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    I have to agree with you Instructor. After a year of training you should know what you are doing and how to be safe in an attack.

    I think at black belt level one should have mastered the basics of an art. I understand being a black belt does not make you a superman but it should give you a fighting chance and the more experience you have the better chance you have. A black belt should be able to share their knowledge as well.

    I do not look down on others standards, I just know what mine are. I do think other arts look down at the Korean arts for this reason but I know we don't do things to impress other styles.

    Perhaps I am missing the boat because in my schools 12 year history I have only promoted four people to the rank of black belt in MuSool Hapkido. I offer contracts if the student wants one but they are not required to be a student at my dojang.
     
  4. oftheherd1

    oftheherd1 Senior Master

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    In the Hapkido I learned, you could indeed obtain a black belt in one year. But it required a lot of time in the dojo. There was a published set of techniques to learn. If you didn't spend the time and learn those techniques you would not be promoted. Not to black belt, nor to any belt you were aspiring to. It pretty much required 5 or more nights at school per week, and learning more than one technique per session. It also required demonstration of learning for a belt, not just attendance. That was on post and set up that way due to most people only being in Korea for one year. Frankly, there weren't that many black belts as most didn't begin training the minute they arrived in Korea, nor did many attend more than two nights a week. Two nights a week was the norm expected unless you demonstrated a strong desire and ability to learn, and asked our GM to be allowed to train more often.

    Off post it was a different matter. One technique at a time until mastered, then the next. You could still learn quickly, but not as much.

    As to strikes, our method of teaching strikes was they were first taught as ways to break off a grab. Later, they might be a way to block a strike or kick, or a final move after a block.
     
  5. Instructor

    Instructor Master Black Belt

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    My teacher has only promoted three to black belt, me and his two son's. My senior student earned his High Green Belt (5th Gup). I just sort of offhanded commented to him, "no pressure but you've advanced further than any of my other students and I've been teaching for years."

    It isn't that we are hard core or the material is particularly hard to learn, it's just that so few are really committed to staying with something long enough to excel.
     
  6. oftheherd1

    oftheherd1 Senior Master

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    I think the bolded statement is true of all martial arts, but Hapkido particularly. There are intricate moves to be learned, and there is pain involved in learning as well. Not everyone wishes to continue that for Hapkido advancement. The stretching and cardio alone can be daunting.

    As I said, no doubt that is true with other martial arts as well.123
     

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