differences between Hapkido and Tae Kwon Do

Discussion in 'Hapkido' started by matt.m, Jul 16, 2006.

  1. oftheherd1

    oftheherd1 Senior Master

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    I always heard founder Choi studied under Takeda, but that is disputed by some. But frankly, most of the history of Hapkido I have learned from posters on MT or checking the internet. It just wasn't an important thing in my studies. My GM would answer my questions, but didn't hold classes on Hapkido history, at least not for 1st Dan nor 2nd Dan.

    It seemed that as the GM of his own kwan, that wasn't necessary. I got the impression the other GM were the same. He told me that founder Choi came from Japan, having studied there. He said all the old GM knew that. He also told me once who some of the older GM were, but their names didn't mean anything to me then. He also mentioned knowing and studying with some old GM, such as Bong Soo Hong. that name I remembered as I knew him from the movie Billy Jack.

    When I studied under Jhoon Goo Rhee, it was the same. I thing we just guessed there was some TKD in the sky that trained all TKD instructors or something, all senior instructors came from that. lol And he taught what I would guess was a very traditional TKD. We studied blocks, punches, and kicks. We were taught to constantly work on increasing power and speed. Without it being said, we learned to use gi (focusing energy). I often wonder if I had been able to stay with him and been belted, if I might have been taught more about some of those 'artsy' moves, or been taught some throws or joint locks.

    Frankly, I agree that grappling moves added to TKD would be an advantage. I think a little more practice in striking and kicking might not help some Hapkido. But as I learned it, probably not that much. In Hapkido, we just learn that as we go and get stronger and faster. Interesting to contemplate though.

    Week end seminars for BB in Hapkido disgusts me. Or any other MA for that matter. I think I may have run into one myself a few years back. He didn't seem anxious to talk when he found out I was belted and didn't seem to want to answer what style he was belted in.
     
  2. Kong Soo Do

    Kong Soo Do IKSDA Director

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    I want to say this was about five years ago. Guys an 8th Dan (maybe 9th now?) in the KKW and big time into the sport side. His buddy is a HKD GM (8th IIRC). Seminar was exclusively for TKD BB's in the school. Best part is that, according to the flyer, the only requirement was being a TKD BB. So no former HKD experience needed. And it wasn't just a first Dan HKD rank to be had...it all depended on your TKD rank. So I'm assuming from how it read that you could get an instant 2nd or 3rd as well if you were high enough in your TKD rank. All based on what you learned in a single weekend.

    See...you've been doing it the hard way all this time. :D

    Check out this thread and the link provided to the flyer:

    Need a HKD BB to go with your TKD BB?
     
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  3. oftheherd1

    oftheherd1 Senior Master

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    I think I remember you posting something about that once before Kong Soo Do. I still can't believe it. Well yes, I can. Some people will lower their standards and just think it is OK. I mentioned before a TKD instructor who advertised teaching Hapkido as well. I had driven by his school many times, and finally decided to see what he was doing and how his teaching was about. I inadvertently picked a time when there were no classes, and he was out. Only his wife was there. When I asked about Hapkido, she confirmed it was taught. When I asked what style, she got real strange and allowed I should talk to her husband. Then got on the 'phone and suddenly she had to leave, as her husband was picking her up, and he told me I could come back when he was teaching. I didn't see the value to that.

    I noticed from your link, a poster named Sidekick had this to say:

    For any here on MT who are considering buying some books or CDs to learn Hapkido at home, without any access to an instructor, whether in a dojang or on line, it normally isn't that easy to learn joint locking, throws, pressure points, and the other things. It gets easier as you progress, but you don't start out that way.

    That is why I personally cannot agree with being belted in and teaching TKD doesn't earn you a BB in Hapkido. If it was that easy, why waste time and money on a seminar? Why have to separate martial arts?

    I don't know that any SD techniques TKD has came from Hapkido. Maybe in individual schools. But as we have discussed in this thread, it appears they don't even know some of the meaning of some moves in kata, That makes me think those things probably came from elsewhere.

    Founder Choi did indeed prefer and teach low kicks over high kicks. High kicks came later. Low kicks are still preferred by the older GM, even though they incorporate and teach high kicks as well. That I know from my GM.
     

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