Conditioning for when you are in your 30s and 40s

Discussion in 'The Competitive Edge' started by thanson02, Jun 15, 2017.

  1. JR 137

    JR 137 Senior Master

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    Add the nervous system controlling the energy, as in strike a nerve and get temporary paralysis along the nerve (such as the "funny bone"), and recruiting more/the right muscle fibers through nerve transmission, and you've got my definition of chi/ki.
     
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  2. PhotonGuy

    PhotonGuy Senior Master

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    Im 41. I more or less do the same stuff that I did in my twenties.
     
  3. JR 137

    JR 137 Senior Master

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    It's not that hard to do if you didn't do much in your 20s. :)

    In all seriousness, do you recover like you did in your 20s?
     
  4. thanson02

    thanson02 Green Belt

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    It takes longer to bounce back then it used to. I started noticing the difference when I was 31-32. Slight injuries and sourness that I would be fine with after a day or two suddenly took almost a week to get over. I watched my diet and did what I could so it wasn't that bad, but I was certainly there.
     
  5. Psilent Knight

    Psilent Knight Blue Belt

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    Not humanly possible.

    Better yet, show me someone who can run at max heart rate for that long, and I'll say he/she IS NOT HUMAN!
     
  6. Psilent Knight

    Psilent Knight Blue Belt

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    Okay guys, it appears that the main theme of this thread is recovery for the 40 and over crowd. Something I have read in a fitness journal about a year ago said something that caught my attention. It was mainly concerning physical fitness and recovery for the 60 and over crowd but I thought I'd share it here as I think most of you would find this info beneficial in general. I don't remember it verbatim but here's the gist of it:

    The recommended daily allowance of protein for the average male is 56 grams. Shoot for at least double that. In a USDA study, men who consumed twice the recommended amount of protein lost more fat and maintained more muscle than those who consumed less. They also recommended limiting carbohydrate intake to around 100 grams.

    The reason this kind of information is important is because sufficient protein intake, along with proper rest and sleep, is KEY to successful recovery.

    I am also in full agreement with JR 137 about the H.I.I.T. protocol as I have read the same type of research over the last couple of years. I've read that after much research, even U.S. Air Force Cardiologist Dr. Kenneth Cooper—the very man who coined the term "aerobics”—now believes there is no correlation between aerobic performance and health.

    There are two HIIT protocols that I have learned about during my research. JR 137 already described one of them; it is commonly referred to as Tabatas. But there's another one that I am interested in which I haven't done yet known as the sprint 8 workout.

    With the sprint 8 workout you do 30 seconds of all out sprinting followed by 1.5 minutes - 2 minutes of active rest (just like the 20 second/10 second tabata workout). But you do this 8 times for a total of about 20 minutes.

    Like I said I have yet to do this but have done Tabata sprints. The reason I prefer sprints over other exercises that can be used in this exercise format is because there are studies that I've read linking sprints with HGH release which is ALSO important for recovery.
     
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