Wondering about Aikido, and some others

Decker

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Hi all, I'm new here, and I've just got some questions/uncertainties.

I've been learning Taekwondo (WTF style) for almost 2 years, and have been taking Sports Chanbara for about one and a half years. I was wondering if Aikido, more specifically the Ki no Kenkyukai version, would be a good complement to what I already have.

I learn the abovementioned arts/sports mainly for self-defence, but also for fitness and the fun of it all, especially for Sports Chanbara, which teaches some rudimentary Kenjutsu strikes, and allows students to practice full-speed and full-impact weapons sparring using safe padded or airsoft weaponry. I've trained with katana-length and wakizashi-length "swords".

Anyway, I was thinking of picking up a "softer" martial art that doesn't emphasise so much on striking for a change of "flavour", as well as more exposure/experience, and I thought of Aikido. I'm also somewhat curious about the so-called "internal" martial arts like taijiquan: is their manipulation of qi the same as that of standard/Ki no Kenkyukai Aikido?

Also, how does the Aikido way handling of weapons like bokken and jo differ from that of other arts like Kenjutsu and Jodo (Shinto Muso Ryu maybe)? Am kind of interested in learning jo, more on the practical application side than tradition (no jodo schools in my country): perhaps there are some effective basic moves possible to learn by myself?

Thank you very much.
 

Hawke

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Greetings Decker,

You can try asking your question in the Aikido section. Aikido in my experience tends to be traditional and formal. TKD tends to be linear in their attacks, while Aikido tends to be circular. Aikido borrows the force of their attacker (uke) and redirects that energy. Aikido will teach you to break your fall, roll, joint manipulation, and throw your opponent. Some schools actively teach the sword so you will have a better understanding of the movements. Other schools may not teach swords (bokken) or jo. I have came across only a handful that will teach a seperate iado class with Aikido (thedojousa.com).

I am not familiar with the Ki no Kenkyukai version. Maybe someone in the Aikido section can help you out. If you like playing with sticks (think of a jo cut in half) FMA is pretty sweet.
 

Callandor

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Personally, I think Aikido training would complement your WTF TKD background fairly well. I study Judo and WTF TKD and find the combo good. Aikido and TKD would not be much different from Judo and TKD.
 

Budo_NJ

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Hi Decker,

I think aikido training would complement your previous TKD and Chanbara sword training (the movements in aikido are based on sword fighting). I'm not familiar with Ki no Kenkyukai Aikido, but from the name I would assume there is more emphasis on the Ki as compared to other styles of aikido. Also, the aiki jo have circular movements as opposed to Shinto Muso Ryu.
 

qi-tah

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Anyway, I was thinking of picking up a "softer" martial art that doesn't emphasise so much on striking for a change of "flavour", as well as more exposure/experience, and I thought of Aikido. I'm also somewhat curious about the so-called "internal" martial arts like taijiquan: is their manipulation of qi the same as that of standard/Ki no Kenkyukai Aikido?
.

The three internal martial arts of CMA are Xing Yi, Ba gua zhang and Taiji quan... of these, ba gua is the most similar to the circular Aikido movements. If you were looking for an internal complement to yr external practices and liked the look of Aikido, you will probably like the look of ba gua as well! I find Taiji to be terribly finicky and exacting, and probably best understood once you've had some experience in another internal style. Just my opinion, mind!

Best of luck whatever you decide to take up! :asian:
 

Insley Stiles

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Greetings Decker san,

I was studying Uechi Ryu, a hard/soft style of Okinawan karate when I decided to switch to Aikido for a compliment to what I was doing. I think Aikido would help round out your training.

As far as swords are concerned, I think that Kenjutsu, at least at my school, tends to be somewhat different than Aiki Ken. It is difficult to be too specific in a short time but in general I can say that Aiki Ken is much 'softer' while Tenshin Shoden Katori Shinto-Ruy Kenjutsu (we practice a hard branch of the style) is much 'harder'. In Aiki the focus is not necessarily combat, whereas in kenjutsu the focus is very much on combat. Hope this helps.

Regards,
Ins
 
OP
D

Decker

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Thanks all for the insightful and helpful replies. ^_^

Haha I've posted the exact same question in another forum and it hasn't got a single reply...
 

still learning

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Hello, Before you sign up for any Aikido classes? You want to check out some JUDO classes!

Just my thoughts.....JUDO is real good on hands on training.......Aloha
 

stoneheart

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Aikido is an excellent complement to any striking art if you want to study in a traditional dojo setting. I've noticed my defense and footwork has improved substantially in karate since I began aikido.
 

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