When you are unable to roll, due to injury...

TSDTexan

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What do you personally do, to continue training, if you cannot roll with others.

Like what are you doing on the mats if you cannot handle the body weight of another person in a roll.

I am thinking ribs type injury.
 

dunc

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Just train the top (or any appropriate position that avoids aggravating your injury)
 

Buka

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When I was a green belt I tore my hamstring quite severely. I couldn't train for a couple months, but I never missed one class, went to the dojo every single day and every single night. I watched them all, beginners and advanced classes alike, big notebook on my lap.

I made notes on everything, what was done in each class, who was in each class, who was teaching the class, and most important (to my way of thinking) all the sparring that took place.

During that sparring I noted who scored with what, who was hit with what, who countered successfully and how they countered, and why I thought each event happened. I read those notes every day and every night. Made a separate file on each and every student, and the instructors, and what their tendencies were.

That torn hamstring turned out to be one of the the best things that ever happened to me. When I could train again, even though I couldn't kick high with that leg yet, I was absolutely smoking people.

It's hard to really study fighters when you're taking the class with them. But if you're watching with a notebook at the ready.....ooh, mama.
 

Tony Dismukes

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This playlist has some partner drills, but it also has a lot of solo movement drills you can work on while you are recovering:
Stephan Kesting BJJ drill playlist (Can't embed it as a video because it's a full playlist of videos.)

I also recommend watching videos by Rory van Vliet just to start absorbing concepts and ideas. Don't worry about learning specific techniques from the videos. Just pay attention to the ideas behind what's being shown. Here's an example.
 
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TSDTexan

TSDTexan

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This playlist has some partner drills, but it also has a lot of solo movement drills you can work on while you are recovering:
Stephan Kesting BJJ drill playlist (Can't embed it as a video because it's a full playlist of videos.)

I also recommend watching videos by Rory van Vliet just to start absorbing concepts and ideas. Don't worry about learning specific techniques from the videos. Just pay attention to the ideas behind what's being shown. Here's an example.

So the xrays came back. Doc says #7, and #8 ribs (Right side) are broken. Its crazy to think, someone taking side control aggressively can lead to broken ribs.

I heard/felt it when it happened and stopped the roll.
 

Tony Dismukes

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So the xrays came back. Doc says #7, and #8 ribs (Right side) are broken. Its crazy to think, someone taking side control aggressively can lead to broken ribs.

I heard/felt it when it happened and stopped the roll.
That sucks. Was there a big size differential between you and your partner? I've never seen that happen before, but I've occasionally felt the potential.

In your shoes, I would focus for a while on watching classes/videos and doing whatever solo drills you can do without aggravating your injury. When you get back to partner training, be aware that even being on top of side control can be uncomfortable for your ribs if you are using a heavy version of side control. (Most top control positions have "heavy" variations where you are crushing the life out of your opponent and "boxing in" versions where you are just controlling your opponent's movement without applying much weight.) (That's my own terminology, BTW, I don't know if there are widely used names for those different approaches.)
 

Dirty Dog

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When I was a green belt I tore my hamstring quite severely. I couldn't train for a couple months, but I never missed one class, went to the dojo every single day and every single night. I watched them all, beginners and advanced classes alike, big notebook on my lap.

I made notes on everything, what was done in each class, who was in each class, who was teaching the class, and most important (to my way of thinking) all the sparring that took place.

During that sparring I noted who scored with what, who was hit with what, who countered successfully and how they countered, and why I thought each event happened. I read those notes every day and every night. Made a separate file on each and every student, and the instructors, and what their tendencies were.

That torn hamstring turned out to be one of the the best things that ever happened to me. When I could train again, even though I couldn't kick high with that leg yet, I was absolutely smoking people.

It's hard to really study fighters when you're taking the class with them. But if you're watching with a notebook at the ready.....ooh, mama.
Absolutely. About 12 years ago, I had 18" of gut and a handful of tumors removed. I was discharged Thursday afternoon, and was at the Dojang Thursday evening. I observed. I studied. I verbally instructed students. Training is training.
 

Bill Mattocks

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What do you personally do, to continue training, if you cannot roll with others.

Like what are you doing on the mats if you cannot handle the body weight of another person in a roll.

I am thinking ribs type injury.
I realize that grappling is vastly different than punching/kicking, but as a karate person, I can say that whenever I cannot train (like recently) due to injury or ill health, I do what I can. I practice kata. I watch from the sidelines and see what I can learn that way. I teach the kids and the newbie adults, which also always teaches me things. I figure I can do something even if I can't do what I want to do.
 
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TSDTexan

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That sucks. Was there a big size differential between you and your partner? I've never seen that happen before, but I've occasionally felt the potential.

In your shoes, I would focus for a while on watching classes/videos and doing whatever solo drills you can do without aggravating your injury. When you get back to partner training, be aware that even being on top of side control can be uncomfortable for your ribs if you are using a heavy version of side control. (Most top control positions have "heavy" variations where you are crushing the life out of your opponent and "boxing in" versions where you are just controlling your opponent's movement without applying much weight.) (That's my own terminology, BTW, I don't know if there are widely used names for those different approaches.)
Actually, I (@6'4" ) was the bigger of us two. I had kept him at bay for about four minutes with my long legs, but when he finally got by.... He came down like an avalanche.

I told him, take it easy, its my first day rolling.
Lol.
 
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