What weapons do you train in your FMA?

geezer

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In case any FMA enthusiasts are still hanging around and would like to liven up this forum, I thought I'd toss this out there. People tend to think of FMA as a weapons-based art. Of course it's much more. Still, what kinds of weapons do you train in your FMA?

Do you focus primarily single-stick work? Double stick? Espada y daga? How about cane and staff? Long, short, light, heavy? How about bladed weapons? Karakmbits, barongs, bolos, etc.? Any unusual weapons like the kampilan? If so, what do you feel that adds to your art?
 

Holmejr

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We basically do single stick, bolo/barong, knife, bolo & knife and open hands. We are really big on encounter or situation training and not so much on the standard Kali flow drills although we do do tapi tapi.

Eskrido de Alcuizar
Buena Park, CA
World Eskrido Federation
 

Rich Parsons

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In case any FMA enthusiasts are still hanging around and would like to liven up this forum, I thought I'd toss this out there. People tend to think of FMA as a weapons-based art. Of course it's much more. Still, what kinds of weapons do you train in your FMA?

Do you focus primarily single-stick work? Double stick? Espada y daga? How about cane and staff? Long, short, light, heavy? How about bladed weapons? Karakmbits, barongs, bolos, etc.? Any unusual weapons like the kampilan? If so, what do you feel that adds to your art?

In Balintawak , it is Single Stick Dueling , and it came from Stick and Dagger so one can go back insert the Blade in the left hand easily and then also make the stick a blade.

The Blade body and footwork is different then a blunt or impact weapon.
The attributes of the weapon will dictate the body mechanics.

In Modern Arnis, Double Stick, Stick and Dagger , Blade and Dagger, Single Stick, Double dagger, single dagger, staff and improvised.
The Karambit , I do not train as I have only found a few that fits my finger and also not cut my hand just by holding it. :(
And those that are large enough , well I sold them to enthusiast that really wanted them. I have trained Long sword and Katana, and Wakizashi , Kampilan , and for those that could be or would be two handed is single handed for me. :(

I also train scarf , and other flexible , weapons or improvised such as belts and leather cords ...


Requirements for the art of Modern Arnis per the requirements I use, is two stick, stick and dagger, stick, dagger and empty hand.

***
I have used improvised weapons in self defense, including a sealed tuna fish can.

Playing with multiple weapons allows one to know how the weapon works and how it can be used.
 

Argus

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In case any FMA enthusiasts are still hanging around and would like to liven up this forum, I thought I'd toss this out there. People tend to think of FMA as a weapons-based art. Of course it's much more. Still, what kinds of weapons do you train in your FMA?

Do you focus primarily single-stick work? Double stick? Espada y daga? How about cane and staff? Long, short, light, heavy? How about bladed weapons? Karakmbits, barongs, bolos, etc.? Any unusual weapons like the kampilan? If so, what do you feel that adds to your art?

I really want to know who can teach me how to use the kampilan! I feel like it deserves its own art, even.
It would really be cool to see more FMA systems spend time with less common weapons like this. Same for staff and sibat, or even sword and shield!
Then we can start sparring with HEMA groups ;)
 

Holmejr

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I really want to know who can teach me how to use the kampilan! I feel like it deserves its own art, even.
It would really be cool to see more FMA systems spend time with less common weapons like this. Same for staff and sibat, or even sword and shield!
Then we can start sparring with HEMA groups ;)
Look for a Kalis Ilustrisimo school.
I understand that the kampilon was Grandmaster Antonio Tatang Ilustrisimo weopon of choice. There is a KI school down the street from me in Irvine, CA. You can contact the instructor via meetup.com. Maybe you can get a lead from them.

 

fogley

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In case any FMA enthusiasts are still hanging around and would like to liven up this forum, I thought I'd toss this out there. People tend to think of FMA as a weapons-based art. Of course it's much more. Still, what kinds of weapons do you train in your FMA?

Do you focus primarily single-stick work? Double stick? Espada y daga? How about cane and staff? Long, short, light, heavy? How about bladed weapons? Karakmbits, barongs, bolos, etc.? Any unusual weapons like the kampilan? If so, what do you feel that adds to your art?
hi there bit off topic but do you know any good schools of arnis esckrima in west yorkshire britain north of england if so pls provide with addres maybe telephone contact thank you
 
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geezer

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hi there bit off topic but do you know any good schools of arnis esckrima in west yorkshire britain north of england if so pls provide with addres maybe telephone contact thank you
Sorry. It's a long way from Arizona to Yorkshire! But if you look into it, somebody has probably got a club going. Bill Newman's people taught Escrima (originally connected with the Latosa system I studied) in the UK through the European Wing Tsun Organization. That's one possible avenue for investigation.

So if you find a good group, post back and share info. That's one thing forums like this are good for. Best of luck!
 

Tigerwarrior

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Ok the school I'm in mostly trains stick, dagger, double dagger, stick and dagger, bolo techniques, some sword techniques and sometimes shields. We also get to choose which weapon we personally want to specialize in bolo, ginunting,talibong,tomahawk etc. We also play around with weapons from other arts from time to time. One of my training partners is also a hema practitioner so we have lots of versatility. Although we train using so many weapons we also try to train empty hands as much as possible.
 
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geezer

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Look for a Kalis Ilustrisimo school.
I understand that the kampilon was Grandmaster Antonio Tatang Ilustrisimo weopon of choice. There is a KI school down the street from me in Irvine, CA. You can contact the instructor via meetup.com. Maybe you can get a lead from them.

Kalis Illustrisimo is hard to find. John Jacobo taught some Illustrisimo here in the Phoenix area. Quality stuff, but I haven't seen or heard from him for at least a dozen years!
 
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geezer

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So in my club, based on Latosa Escrima Concepts and Torres DTE, we focus more on broad concepts that can be translated to whatever is at hand. So we use sticks and staffs of various lengths and weights, learning to adjust, translate and apply the same fundamental kinetic concepts to each in a practical way.

The training starts with a short, stout (roughly 24in - 28in.) bast籀n, then progresses to double-sticks, then staff work, then cane and heavy-stick (like and axe-handle or T-ball bat). Blade-work includes knife and machete, but is not heavily emphasized to the degree of some other FMA systems.

On the other hand improvised weapons are a big thing for us. Since most people are not likely to be carrying a bast籀n, tunkod, sibat, or bolo on a daily basis, the ability translate and transition to whatever may be at hand is an essential ability for self-defense. This is the primary reason we train using a variety of different sticks and other weapons, of varying lengths and weights.

GM Rene Latosa was also very adept at Filipino Cadena de Mano and western boxing, so empty hand work is also an important ...perhaps the most important part of this tradition. My empty hand foundation is Wing Chun, and this difference is reflected in my personal expression of this art.

As far as exotic weapons go, like the kampilan for example, I don't have any formal training. Training as a generalist I feel that I could probably make such a weapon "work" ...after a little practice, but that doesn't mean I would be using it very well or as intended.

It would sure be fun and interesting to learn how to handle it properly! :D
 

Argus

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Look for a Kalis Ilustrisimo school.
I understand that the kampilon was Grandmaster Antonio Tatang Ilustrisimo weopon of choice. There is a KI school down the street from me in Irvine, CA. You can contact the instructor via meetup.com. Maybe you can get a lead from them.


I'd absolutely love to train Kalis Ilustrisimo. It's my favorite FMA system.
I had some exposure to it during the relatively short period I studied Lameco under Dave Gould. It just made sense to me and seemed to mesh really well with my Wing Chun background as well. I still practice what I learned, and what little I've picked up just from watching old videos of Tatang or meeting and learning from other KI practitioners on occasion. I'd love to study the entire system properly, though.
Would you happen to know, or know anyone who might know, if there's anyone who trains or has trained KI in Tokyo, Japan? I've scoured the internet and found nothing, but I have a hard time believing that there aren't at least a few low profile KI practitioners who'd love to have a training partner here in Tokyo...
All that said, though, while I've seen pictures of Tatang with a kampilon, I don't recall ever seeing him or any of his students demonstrating techniques with it, other than like one video from Romeo Macapagal briefly demonstrating some two-handed weapon. Seems like it isn't trained much these days.
 
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Argus

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So in my club, based on Latosa Escrima Concepts and Torres DTE, we focus more on broad concepts that can be translated to whatever is at hand. So we use sticks and staffs of various lengths and weights, learning to adjust, translate and apply the same fundamental kinetic concepts to each in a practical way.

The training starts with a short, stout (roughly 24in - 28in.) bast籀n, then progresses to double-sticks, then staff work, then cane and heavy-stick (like and axe-handle or T-ball bat). Blade-work includes knife and machete, but is not heavily emphasized to the degree of some other FMA systems.

On the other hand improvised weapons are a big thing for us. Since most people are not likely to be carrying a bast籀n, tunkod, sibat, or bolo on a daily basis, the ability translate and transition to whatever may be at hand is an essential ability for self-defense. This is the primary reason we train using a variety of different sticks and other weapons, of varying lengths and weights.

GM Rene Latosa was also very adept at Filipino Cadena de Mano and western boxing, so empty hand work is also an important ...perhaps the most important part of this tradition. My empty hand foundation is Wing Chun, and this difference is reflected in my personal expression of this art.

As far as exotic weapons go, like the kampilan for example, I don't have any formal training. Training as a generalist I feel that I could probably make such a weapon "work" ...after a little practice, but that doesn't mean I would be using it very well or as intended.

It would sure be fun and interesting to learn how to handle it properly! :D

To be fair, that's probably how a lot of weapons that entered existing FMA systems from abroad were incorporated anyway.
As long as it's clear that it's your own approach, I see it as totally valid and legitimate. Maybe even more practical than a method that has been passed down many generations yet nobody trains it or understands how the original creator intended it to be used anyway.
One thing that I love about FMA systems is how much more open they seem to be when compared to many other TMAs, and yet, still very TMA.
 

Monkey Turned Wolf

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Any combination of open-hand, sticks and knives. A bolo, another edged weapon that looks a lot like a bolo but it's name escapes me, and a 6-ft staff. Also occasionally we'll use something else for improv and/or fun, like a hatchet.
 

Holmejr

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I'd absolutely love to train Kalis Ilustrisimo. It's my favorite FMA system.
I had some exposure to it during the relatively short period I studied Lameco under Dave Gould. It just made sense to me and seemed to mesh really well with my Wing Chun background as well. I still practice what I learned, and what little I've picked up just from watching old videos of Tatang or meeting and learning from other KI practitioners on occasion. I'd love to study the entire system properly, though.
Would you happen to know, or know anyone who might know, if there's anyone who trains or has trained KI in Tokyo, Japan? I've scoured the internet and found nothing, but I have a hard time believing that there aren't at least a few low profile KI practitioners who'd love to have a training partner here in Tokyo...
All that said, though, while I've seen pictures of Tatang with a kampilon, I don't recall ever seeing him or any of his students demonstrating techniques with it, other than like one video from Romeo Macapagal briefly demonstrating some two-handed weapon. Seems like it isn't trained much these days.
I'd absolutely love to train Kalis Ilustrisimo. It's my favorite FMA system.
I had some exposure to it during the relatively short period I studied Lameco under Dave Gould. It just made sense to me and seemed to mesh really well with my Wing Chun background as well. I still practice what I learned, and what little I've picked up just from watching old videos of Tatang or meeting and learning from other KI practitioners on occasion. I'd love to study the entire system properly, though.
Would you happen to know, or know anyone who might know, if there's anyone who trains or has trained KI in Tokyo, Japan? I've scoured the internet and found nothing, but I have a hard time believing that there aren't at least a few low profile KI practitioners who'd love to have a training partner here in Tokyo...
All that said, though, while I've seen pictures of Tatang with a kampilon, I don't recall ever seeing him or any of his students demonstrating techniques with it, other than like one video from Romeo Macapagal briefly demonstrating some two-handed weapon. Seems like it isn't trained much these days.
did you try to access the linked Meetup page? Did it not work? Contacting JJ is prob your best bet. This Saturday I could try to stop by the school and get more information.
 

fogley

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Sorry. It's a long way from Arizona to Yorkshire! But if you look into it, somebody has probably got a club going. Bill Newman's people taught Escrima (originally connected with the Latosa system I studied) in the UK through the European Wing Tsun Organization. That's one possible avenue for investigation.

So if you find a good group, post back and share info. That's one thing forums like this are good for. Best of luck!
thank you will do i appreciate it
 

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