What other martial art...?

geezer

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I am stealing the idea for this thread from a guy over on FMAtalk...but it led to an interesting discussion, so here I am, shamelessly plagiarizing. Apologies to Tuhon Bill.

Anyway, here's the deal. If you had unlimited time and money, what other arts would you study besides Wing Chun/Tsun and why?

As for myself, I don't have enough time, money or ability to do justice to what I study now, namely Wing Tsun and Eskrima. But, on the other hand, there is so much cool stuff out there. I'd like to know more about grappling. I've always felt that BJJ, or perhaps something like Aikijujutsu would help round me out. Or maybe just bust me up?!?

So how about you guys?
 

yak sao

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If time and $ were no object, while I would be tempted to learn anything and everything I could get my hands on, I think what I would really want to do would be to dive headfirst into learning as much WT/WC/VT as I could from as many differnt sources as I could.
 

El_Nastro

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Western swordsmanship.

I actually did attend a few ARMA classes in Houston. Those guys know their *****. They're actually real, disciplined, dedicated martial artists and completely not Dungeons&Dragons-SCA-types. It was awesome watching 'em. Here's a little clip:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tsGU5KI1qJA&feature=related

I like how even just that one video destroys the myth of the Japanese sword being the next best thing to a lightsaber while the European swords were crude, clumsy 10-lb. boat-anchors. The "awesomeness" of Samurai and the katana is just sold way to aggressively for it to be anything but grating and annoying, so I find what ARMA does particularly attractive.

The problems are that the sword stuff is too expensive, and Wing Chun wins in terms of practicality.
 

yak sao

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Western swordsmanship.

I actually did attend a few ARMA classes in Houston. Those guys know their *****. They're actually real, disciplined, dedicated martial artists and completely not Dungeons&Dragons-SCA-types. It was awesome watching 'em. Here's a little clip:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tsGU5KI1qJA&feature=related

I like how even just that one video destroys the myth of the Japanese sword being the next best thing to a lightsaber while the European swords were crude, clumsy 10-lb. boat-anchors. The "awesomeness" of Samurai and the katana is just sold way to aggressively for it to be anything but grating and annoying, so I find what ARMA does particularly attractive.



OK you got me on that one....I'd have to learn the western sword arts....I love the 2 handed sword...guess it's my Scottish heritage.
I'm with you...I get tired of hearing how good the Japanese sword arts are, when I would bet any amount of money that the western equivalent is every bit as good if not better.
 
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El_Nastro

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Western swordsmanship.

I actually did attend a few ARMA classes in Houston. Those guys know their *****. They're actually real, disciplined, dedicated martial artists and completely not Dungeons&Dragons-SCA-types. It was awesome watching 'em. Here's a little clip:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tsGU5KI1qJA&feature=related

I like how even just that one video destroys the myth of the Japanese sword being the next best thing to a lightsaber while the European swords were crude, clumsy 10-lb. boat-anchors. The "awesomeness" of Samurai and the katana is just sold way to aggressively for it to be anything but grating and annoying, so I find what ARMA does particularly attractive.



OK you got me on that one....I'd have to learn the western sword arts....I love the 2 handed sword...guess it's my Scottish heritage.
I'm with you...I get tired of hearing how good the Japanese sword arts are, when I would bet any amount of money that the western equivalent is every bit as good if not better.

Yeah, when I went to ARMA classes (taught by those dudes in the vid), a buddy came with me, and he brought his wooden samurai sword (bokken). John Clements (the head ARMA guy) saw my friend & had this look on his face like "Oh god...another one of those", then he just sort of went off on how the samurai sword is not what we have been led to believe; they're not any higher quality than any other type of sword (in fact, according to Clements, who said he used to be a katana-phile, they're really brittle and inflexible), they're not lighter or faster or or better in any way from the European longsword. In fact, with the two edges and the crossguard, there's a whole lot of stuff you can do with the longsword that you simply cannot do with the katana.

The only thing the katana has going for it is looks. Some people prefer the look of it, and they're attracted to the "cultural trimmings" associated with its use. That's a matter of taste, and there's nothing wrong with personal taste, but it seems we're constantly being told how superior the katana and the samurai's techniques are, and being a bit of a knee-jerk contrarian, I find myself really, really disliking kendo, katanas, ninjitsu and all that sort of samurai-type stuff.
 
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geezer

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The only thing the katana has going for it is looks. Some people prefer the look of it, and they're attracted to the "cultural trimmings" associated with its use. That's a matter of taste, and there's nothing wrong with personal taste, but it seems we're constantly being told how superior the katana and the samurai's techniques are, and being a bit of a knee-jerk contrarian, I find myself really, really disliking kendo, katanas, ninjitsu and all that sort of samurai-type stuff.

It's true that there has been that whole cultural bias thing, favoring the "exotic" Asian MAs and devaluing our Western martial traditions. That's where Eskrima has worked for me. After all, it is the ultimate blend of SE Asian and Spanish/European martial traditions. I have also been trying my hand at a bit of rapier fencing, but it's way too fast and subtle for a geezer like me. I think a cutlass or broadsword would suit me better. And for pure practicality, there's always the cane. I just hope that I don't have to learn how to use it for some years yet!
 

Nyrotic

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What about Chinese fencing? For all the rave about Asian martial arts being so awesome we see almost NOTHING about the Chinese Jian? This weapon is near legendary in their culture, yet very little of it's applicative art remains to this day!


There's only so many videos like that....
 
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bully

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Maybe Escrima and BJJ.

Praying Mantis interests me also. A long time ago I attended a 2 day seminar with a UK Kung Fu Sifu (I cant remember his name but he was head of UK Kung Fu assoc in the 90's, really nice guy).

He taught us Bo Bong (sp) and I have never been so knackered learning a form in my life. My forearms were red raw and I was covered in sweat the whole weekend. Bearing in mind I was in my 20's and fit.....unlike now.

To be honest I dont think I could anything other than WC due to my back.
 

matsu

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for me,at this stage i would pay sifu to teach me for at least 2 hrs everyday,if not longer.
then lets see how long ity takes for me to formulate new muscle memories.
i,m not sure my old bod could take a more dynamic martial art,karate is out due my low back and hips.
so i,ll opt for origami?

actually i did bonsai very seriously for many years and still have ten very good quality show trees so i would dive back into that as well... the ying yang aspect of life!


matsu
 

profesormental

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Greetings.

A preliminary note:

Many times, it is the individual instructor that makes the difference.

That said, other than Wing Chun training I want more training in:

- SubLevel Four American Kenpo with Ron Chap矇l: Simply put, this man has put on so much of the pieces of the puzzle together, with his studies with Ed Parker Sr. in the Chinese Martial Sciences that his materials and training are structured in such a way that you get optimal martial movement training.

- Kenpo and healing work with John LaTourrette: His materials on speed training, mental training and health are the best, specially since he integrates them so well.

A lot of my advanced knowledge comes from the materials of these two gentlemen. Their knowledge has filled the gaps in my Wing Chun, and my Wing Chun has filled gaps in my Kenpo. It is all based on Chinese Martial Sciences.

- Grappling: either BJJ or submission wrestling is a very fun activity that gets you in shape and gets the testosterone flowing! There are guys here that if I had more time, I would train with them often...

- I will not add the others I know, yet I want to spend more time on them: fencing, San Da, Escrima.

- Also, more tactical firearms training. That I would really get into!

Hope this helps.

Juan M. Mercado
 

KamonGuy2

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for me,at this stage i would pay sifu to teach me for at least 2 hrs everyday,if not longer.
then lets see how long ity takes for me to formulate new muscle memories.
i,m not sure my old bod could take a more dynamic martial art,karate is out due my low back and hips.
so i,ll opt for origami?

actually i did bonsai very seriously for many years and still have ten very good quality show trees so i would dive back into that as well... the ying yang aspect of life!


matsu
With al due respect to your Sifu, wouldn't you train with James Sinclair instead? If you have the time and money you migt as well train with the head of the federation!!
 

matsu

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hell yeah mate.he is the man! so he would be my first option anyday, but any of the sifu's i have had privilge to train with have been s##t hot too.all for different reasons.

and i,ll now add bjj to this, we did some basic grappling and ground work with master james last night, oh yeah !!:whip1: such great fun and sooo hard work but really cool to do.
he kept saying he wasnt any good at it but from where i was standing/ laying/rolled in a ball or squashed he looked the part to me!
makes me even more fed up i,ll miss the seminar at the wkend now:wah:

god i hurt all over today!!

matsu
 

KamonGuy2

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hell yeah mate.he is the man! so he would be my first option anyday, but any of the sifu's i have had privilge to train with have been s##t hot too.all for different reasons.

and i,ll now add bjj to this, we did some basic grappling and ground work with master james last night, oh yeah !!:whip1: such great fun and sooo hard work but really cool to do.
he kept saying he wasnt any good at it but from where i was standing/ laying/rolled in a ball or squashed he looked the part to me!
makes me even more fed up i,ll miss the seminar at the wkend now:wah:

god i hurt all over today!!

matsu

Its good to see other chunners (and good wing chunners at that) are showing interest in groundwork

I did apply to go to the seminar but there were no spaces left. It is always good to see chunners opened up to the horror that is grappling. It is a very easy thing to play with once you get your head round it, but most chunners won't talk about it or disguise BJJ with the term anti-grappling
 

Kiru

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I actually already am pretty well rounded, having begun when I was 5 and never could get enough of every system I could get into. So rather than trying a new system if money and time were of no concern, I would instead wish to travel and study where certain systems originated. Wing Chun is a favorite of mine, not from what I have experienced in the training hall, but rather from what I've achieved in actual combat and have been able to attribute to the Wing Chun training, such as the sensitivity derived from Chi Sao. I'd love to do Goju-ryu in Okinawa, and get into some Shaolin training at the temples in China. For fighting, I prefer Wing Chun over the arts used in Shaolin, but to train in a temple would beat visiting a weekly class, for sure. I also would love to train in Muay Thai in one of their Thailand camps.
 
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geezer

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... rather than trying a new system if money and time were of no concern, I would instead wish to travel and study where certain systems originated...

Me too. In fact I'd like to borrow your theme and start a new thread based on this topic.
 
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