What is a Ninja?

J

Jas0n

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Besides a Kawasaki Sportbike....
Anyone know the history or didnt it ever have legitimacy?
 

Cruentus

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You'd be best to ask on a Japanese martial Arts section of MartialTalk. There is actually a "ninjitsu" section as well. Someone there more familiar with the system of "ninjitsu" (The Art of the "ninja") can help you.

I can vouch...however....that yes, "ninja's" have a history and legitimacy.:asian:
 
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Jill666

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My cousin is a ninjuitsu instructor. I have just begun cross-training with him...
Look in the Ninjuitsu section here. Also look for info on and books by Stephen K. Hayes- currently the American connection to the art as taught in Japan. He's written a great deal.

The MA's in the forum here will be able to tell you a lot more than I can.

:asian:
 
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Jill666

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Originally posted by Bujingodai
This will provide all kinds of interesting results.

What do you mean by that?

I don't know you, and am not trying to be rude. Your comment just seemed sarcastic. I'm happy to be wrong, though... (just not too often):D
 

Bujingodai

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I mean nothing more than the obvious political rimraw that goes on about legitamicy vs effectiveness. Traditional vs modern etc etc. It will be a bunch of opinions. Those who are in the populus and those who are not.

If he wants to look for Ninjutsu he needs to seek out lots of sources.

For traditional such as the Bujinkan, Genbukan or Jinenkan
He needs to see
www.e-budo.com
www.winjutsu.com
www.genbukan.org (i think)
Am not sure of the Jinenkan site. There he will find the most collection of legitamite Ninjutsu as it would be called.

If he is looking for independent schools there are a little of Ninja Cowboys out there or Neo Ninja. i won't post any of those sites, they would be easy to find.

For some serious independents, not Neo Ninja.
www.e-ninpo.com
http://unv.aimoo.com
those are places where you could ask for them.

IMO.

Jay Bell on this board is likely the best authority, and he is openminded non biased. I think :)
 
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chufeng

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The first rule of in effective ninjitsu is "don't tell anyone you are a ninja."

The second rule is "blend in;" hard to do in black pajamas and a ski mask, at least in this day and age.

I'm sure there are more rules, but I don't know anything about ninjitsu...I'm just babbling:)

Those who are trained in the art of stealth, though, probably won't advertise it (I'm thinking NSA or CIA operatives)...hard to blend when your cover's blown.

:asian:
chufeng
 

Jay Bell

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Also look for info on and books by Stephen K. Hayes- currently the American connection to the art as taught in Japan. He's written a great deal.

Hi Jill,

That's no so much the case anymore. In the beginnings of Ninpo in the United States, Stephen Hayes was the connection to Hatsumi sensei. Now there are countless students that train regularly with Hatsumi sensei in Japan...that are not and have never been attached to Stephen Hayes.

Jay Bell on this board is likely the best authority, and he is openminded non biased

I'm only an authority in my own mind....and openminded only when I agree with what's being said :D (thanks for the kind words)

For Jinenkan information, you can check out Jinenkan.com
 
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Crazy Chihuahua

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To say that the ninja were not effective as martial artists would be wrong indeed as almost everyone would agree, but I'm not sure their history qualifies as "proud." I mean, correct me if I'm wrong, but weren't they thieves and assassins? I guess somebody might be proud of being able to kill and steal without being seen or caught, but....:shrug:
 
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Scooter

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Originally posted by Jay Bell
No..they were patriots :shrug:

I'm with Jay on this one! The whole thieve and assassin thing is mostly Hollywood because it sells movies.
 

Cryozombie

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The Missouri Budo Taijutsu Dojo (www.mbdojo.com) has the information you want. Go there and check out the "History" section, they have history's of the origins of Ninjutsu as well as several of the other arts that make up Budo Taijutsu, from Paul Richardson's Book of history of the Bujinkan. (Which is apparently out of print, anyone know where I can get it?)

I would post the History here, but I dont want to infringe on the MBDojo's copyright to the info, and I am too lazy to type my own version, since it is already there. :) Besides, I am no expert, Im just a lowly 8th Kyu. I just spent a LOT of time studying the art (Not the techniques but the history and such) before activly JOINING the art, do find out if it was in fact legitimate before starting. After all, with the Ninja HYPE, who could tell...

Chihuhhuha, Ninja weren't thieves and assassins, they were... uh... I like the term Patriot too. According to most of the historys I read they were simply survivalists.

Jill, I think Bujingodai just meant he expected your comment about Stephan Hayes to make everyone post a nasty... But we wont do that. (Well, ok, I won't ;) )
 

Pervaz

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Jason,

The kanji for Nin means persevervance - the sword over the heart.

Some of the schools of the current Bujikan go back over 900 - 1000 years. The black grab crap is Hollywood - althougth histotrically black suits were worn by the theater for the audience not to see them movie scenery.

ninjitsu were an art of survival - some documentated histroy (but given the turbulent periods of Japanese history much evidence was destroyed.)

The Koryu (i.e. legatimacy of the arts currently under soke Hatsumi) is a hotbed - they want documentation - Hatsumi has the scrolls and its a bit political.

There are a few good sites - esp Paul Richardson but so much information is next to useless and even lies.

It all depends on what you want to know - maybe you should find a good teacher.

P
 
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Dennis_Mahon

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The Missouri Budo Taijutsu Dojo (www.mbdojo.com) has the information you want. Go there and check out the "History" section, they have history's of the origins of Ninjutsu as well as several of the other arts that make up Budo Taijutsu, from Paul Richardson's Book of history of the Bujinkan. (Which is apparently out of print, anyone know where I can get it?)

Try Ninjutsu.com ; search under "Books by other Authors" and you should find it there.
 
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Crazy Chihuahua

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"There are 10 types of people in the world, Those who understand Binary and those who do not.
That's clever! :rofl: I wouldn't have ever thought of actually using binary for anything!:D
 
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