Western influences on Karate development?

RoniSwersky

White Belt
Joined
Oct 5, 2021
Messages
8
Reaction score
0
Hi.
I have recently watched two videos by Jesse Enkemp, the Karate Nerd, about the influence of Western martial arts on the development of Karate. The first one was about the influence of boxing on Japanese culture prompting them to adopt Karate as a form of improved boxing. The second was about Gigo Funakoshi adapting kicks from Savate into Karate. I haven't been able to find any information supporting these videos. Can anyone help me? I would like to write a paper on the subject.
Thanks

This is the video about boxing and karate:

This is the video about Savate and karate:
 

seasoned

MT Senior Moderator
Staff member
Lifetime Supporting Member
Joined
Apr 19, 2007
Messages
11,203
Reaction score
1,178
Location
Lives in Texas
Welcome to Martial Talk. I hope your stay here is fun and rewarding. I can't help on the above but I'm sure someone will accommodate you.
Enjoy.
MT staff.
 

Buka

Sr. Grandmaster
MT Mentor
Joined
Jun 27, 2011
Messages
12,377
Reaction score
9,448
Location
Maui
Welcome to Martial Talk, Roni. :)
 

isshinryuronin

Master Black Belt
Joined
Feb 28, 2019
Messages
1,428
Reaction score
1,425
Location
Las Vegas
Hi.
I have recently watched two videos by Jesse Enkemp, the Karate Nerd, about the influence of Western martial arts on the development of Karate. The first one was about the influence of boxing on Japanese culture prompting them to adopt Karate as a form of improved boxing. The second was about Gigo Funakoshi adapting kicks from Savate into Karate. I haven't been able to find any information supporting these videos. Can anyone help me? I would like to write a paper on the subject.
Thanks

This is the video about boxing and karate:

This is the video about Savate and karate:
As usual, Jesse has shared interesting info and perspectives on karate. Ironic that the Japanese intention of bringing boxing there also accomplished establishing that karate was an art unto itself and helped it spread in Japan. The match of the European boxer vs Motobu Choku illustrated the difference between a sport art vs combat art. Even though Motobu was restricted by rules, he had enough in his TMA toolbox (and his fighting heart) to overcome the bigger guy. Motobu was one tough SOB. I'd love to have been sitting ringside.

Regarding savate's influence on karate, it should be noted that this mostly applied to sport karate. Just as in fencing, where a longer sword has an advantage (The Russians infamously got caught using an illegal inch too long one at the Olympics years ago) longer range kicks can provide some advantage in competition.

Since Okinawan karate was a close-in fighting style, it lacked many of the kicks seen today. For example, my style's kihon (core basic techniques) doesn't include roundhouse, crescent or spinning back kicks (A number of Okinawan kata have none or few kicks.) Once sport karate competition began in Japan, an opportunity opened for longer range attacks. Since these were not prevalent in karate at that time, savate was looked to to fill that void.

Eventually, these longer range and higher kicks bled into karate mainstream (even in Okinawa to a lesser extent,) so savate's legacy perhaps lives on. Certainly, in forms competition, these kicks provide a thrill for the spectators and provide additional skills to master and to excite karate students.
 

seasoned

MT Senior Moderator
Staff member
Lifetime Supporting Member
Joined
Apr 19, 2007
Messages
11,203
Reaction score
1,178
Location
Lives in Texas
As usual, Jesse has shared interesting info and perspectives on karate. Ironic that the Japanese intention of bringing boxing there also accomplished establishing that karate was an art unto itself and helped it spread in Japan. The match of the European boxer vs Motobu Choku illustrated the difference between a sport art vs combat art. Even though Motobu was restricted by rules, he had enough in his TMA toolbox (and his fighting heart) to overcome the bigger guy. Motobu was one tough SOB. I'd love to have been sitting ringside.

Regarding savate's influence on karate, it should be noted that this mostly applied to sport karate. Just as in fencing, where a longer sword has an advantage (The Russians infamously got caught using an illegal inch too long one at the Olympics years ago) longer range kicks can provide some advantage in competition.

Since Okinawan karate was a close-in fighting style, it lacked many of the kicks seen today. For example, my style's kihon (core basic techniques) doesn't include roundhouse, crescent or spinning back kicks (A number of Okinawan kata have none or few kicks.) Once sport karate competition began in Japan, an opportunity opened for longer range attacks. Since these were not prevalent in karate at that time, savate was looked to to fill that void.

Eventually, these longer range and higher kicks bled into karate mainstream (even in Okinawa to a lesser extent,) so savate's legacy perhaps lives on. Certainly, in forms competition, these kicks provide a thrill for the spectators and provide additional skills to master and to excite karate students.
Once again a great post on target and on point pertaining to the subject and my art, Okinawan GoJu...
 
OP
R

RoniSwersky

White Belt
Joined
Oct 5, 2021
Messages
8
Reaction score
0
As usual, Jesse has shared interesting info and perspectives on karate. Ironic that the Japanese intention of bringing boxing there also accomplished establishing that karate was an art unto itself and helped it spread in Japan. The match of the European boxer vs Motobu Choku illustrated the difference between a sport art vs combat art. Even though Motobu was restricted by rules, he had enough in his TMA toolbox (and his fighting heart) to overcome the bigger guy. Motobu was one tough SOB. I'd love to have been sitting ringside.

Regarding savate's influence on karate, it should be noted that this mostly applied to sport karate. Just as in fencing, where a longer sword has an advantage (The Russians infamously got caught using an illegal inch too long one at the Olympics years ago) longer range kicks can provide some advantage in competition.

Since Okinawan karate was a close-in fighting style, it lacked many of the kicks seen today. For example, my style's kihon (core basic techniques) doesn't include roundhouse, crescent or spinning back kicks (A number of Okinawan kata have none or few kicks.) Once sport karate competition began in Japan, an opportunity opened for longer range attacks. Since these were not prevalent in karate at that time, savate was looked to to fill that void.

Eventually, these longer range and higher kicks bled into karate mainstream (even in Okinawa to a lesser extent,) so savate's legacy perhaps lives on. Certainly, in forms competition, these kicks provide a thrill for the spectators and provide additional skills to master and to excite karate students.
Great. Thanks a lot. Very helpful.
 

isshinryuronin

Master Black Belt
Joined
Feb 28, 2019
Messages
1,428
Reaction score
1,425
Location
Las Vegas
Great. Thanks a lot. Very helpful.
Just rephrased Jesse Enkemp video and put in a little new context, but glad you guys liked it.

Since the OP referenced Motobu Choki, some may have interest in my new post (#94) in the topic, The Proper Horse Stance, where that stance's role in kata and kumite is explored in surprising (to me) length. Hey, I just follow the path that unfolds in front of me.

I had no idea where it would lead, beyond saying horse stance had little use in fighting. As it turns out, I led myself in an unanticipated direction, meeting up with Motobu again! I discovered there was more to the topic than I figured as I delved into it. This is one of the things I like about Martial Chat - Not only can you learn from others, but thinking about those posts, you can learn from yourself as well.
 
Last edited:
OP
R

RoniSwersky

White Belt
Joined
Oct 5, 2021
Messages
8
Reaction score
0
Just rephrased Jesse Enkemp video and put in a little new context, but glad you guys liked it.

Since the OP referenced Motobu Choki, some may have interest in my new post (#94) in the topic, The Proper Horse Stance, where that stance's role in kata and kumite is explored in surprising (to me) length. Hey, I just follow the path that unfolds in front of me.

I had no idea where it would lead, beyond saying horse stance had little use in fighting. As it turns out, I led myself in an unanticipated direction, meeting up with Motobu again! I discovered there was more to the topic than I figured as I delved into it. This is one of the things I like about Martial Chat - Not only can you learn from others, but thinking about those posts, you can learn from yourself as well.
Thanks. I can't find the post you're referring to. Can you link it to me? Also, do you know of any articles or other sources about the influence of boxing on Japan and karate?
 

isshinryuronin

Master Black Belt
Joined
Feb 28, 2019
Messages
1,428
Reaction score
1,425
Location
Las Vegas
Thanks. I can't find the post you're referring to. Can you link it to me? Also, do you know of any articles or other sources about the influence of boxing on Japan and karate?
Look up "What's New" on the bar above. "The Proper Horse Stance" was an older thread recently come back to life.

IMO there has not been too much influence from boxing in the development of karate. What there is would be post WWII, I think, maybe even post 1960, when Western youth started competing in karate tournaments and were familiar with boxing from the super popular Mohammad Ali and his agile footwork. All the guys then wanted to "Float like a butterfly, sting like a bee." Much of karate's physical and mental doctrine conflicts with boxing's, so I don't see much relation.
 

letsplaygames

Orange Belt
Joined
Feb 8, 2021
Messages
78
Reaction score
52
Hi.
I have recently watched two videos by Jesse Enkemp, the Karate Nerd, about the influence of Western martial arts on the development of Karate. The first one was about the influence of boxing on Japanese culture prompting them to adopt Karate as a form of improved boxing. The second was about Gigo Funakoshi adapting kicks from Savate into Karate. I haven't been able to find any information supporting these videos. Can anyone help me? I would like to write a paper on the subject.
Thanks


I can't speak for Karate outside Shotokan. But the reason "You can Find any information" like the infamous Motobo vs the Boxer, there is little or no information that exists of such claims within Shotokan.

Yoshitaka (or Gigo) Funakoshi "DID NOT ADAPT KICKS form Savate. Fact, there is NO evidence what so ever that GIGO developed Mawashi Geri. (read below for who developed Shotokan's Mawashi Geri)

I Love Jesse the Kararte Nurd excitement on Karate...unsure were he gets his information, Clueless on his inability to fact check!!!!

If karate in Japan did draw influence from Western boxing pre WWII it would have been in the Shito Ryu branch or.... the various Okinawan branches in Okinawa. But.. I still think its highly unlikely due to Western Boxing not being all that well known. (Japan and Okinawa was pretty Xenophobic at that time)

Much of the departure from Okinawan Karate to "What we now think of as "Japanese" Karate" stems from Takeshi Shimoda: a Ninpo Taijutsu master, he becomes Funakoshi's best student, his number #1 unfortunately he dies early, in 1934 in his 30s. Shimoda heavily influenced Yoshitaka Funakoshi and others with his infusion of Nimpo Taijustu Yoshitaka Funakoshi took Takeshi sensei's influences and developed them. (the break or the departure all point to Takeshi Shimoda with Yoshitaka Funakoshi picking up the baton after his unexpected death)


Below is Takeshi Shimoda with Funakoshi Sensei)

1633873643209.png


Nakayama Sensei (seen far right)
1633875698930.png


He is the developer of Mawashi Geri and and Ushiro geri. Nakayama Sensei, after he graduated from Takushoku University in 1937 learned the kicks by practicing with Han Chinese (ChangQuan Quan fa... ala Chinese long fist, while in the Military in Manchuria as an interpreter.

Maybe... just maybe... Yoshitaka Funikoshi developed Yojo Geri Keage which appears pretty specific to Shotokan, but IMO... if so ... it's still due to Takeshi Shimoda's influence.

If boxing influences Shotokan it's after WWII in the 50s... and Savate... well there is no records of that ever influencing Shotokan that I have ever come across

Hope this clarifies things
 
Last edited:

Flying Crane

Sr. Grandmaster
Joined
Sep 21, 2005
Messages
14,801
Reaction score
4,334
Location
San Francisco
I am always skeptical of claims that a certain specific event, or a series of events over a very brief period, caused an entire cultural methodology like karate, to be overhauled.

Different methodologies often influence each other, and it is usually a two-way street. But wholesale changes dont usually happen that quickly nor can be definitively traced to a specific event. Im just skeptical.

Maybe the real truth is that these events sparked a new side branch in the art that was focused on competition, and these changes became prominent within that context. At various times and for various people, the competition aspect may have received a bigger focus, but that is not for everyone.
 
Last edited:

isshinryuronin

Master Black Belt
Joined
Feb 28, 2019
Messages
1,428
Reaction score
1,425
Location
Las Vegas
Maybe the real truth is that these events sparked a new side branch in the art that was focused on competition, and these changes became prominent within that context. At various times and for various people, the competition aspect may have received a bigger focus, but that is not for everyone.
Competition can be like a virus, taking the art's DNA and subverting it to its own purpose of self-perpetuation. In doing so, in may incorporate other arts and influences into its DNA, as well as delete elements from its host, as long as it aids in its own self interest.

Many new rules and procedures have been instituted in competitive karate that have nothing to do with the business of kumite, or even kata. Standardization, sanitation, marching up to the ring and exaggerated bowing and kiai's, and spectatorship have become important elements for example. They have little to do with karate itself, but more to do with the self-perpetuation of the competition scene and sponsoring organizations.

If you take a look at video of the old masters, you can see their kata reflects understated power and control, and perhaps a hint of deadliness, but none of them would come close to winning any modern competition. Their forms just aren't pretty enough. Little formality in their starts and endings - just a simple relaxed bow. Often, no kiai's at all. But, katas were not originated to look pretty, or even to be looked at at all by the public.

So the art mutates into something different from the original, with different goals and outcomes. This is, in and of itself, not bad. But modern sport karate should be recognized for what it is - a mutated version of the TMA with its own agenda and self-interests. As long as subtracting original, or adding new, elements from other arts into sport karate aids in its own propagation, the trend will continue.
 

Buka

Sr. Grandmaster
MT Mentor
Joined
Jun 27, 2011
Messages
12,377
Reaction score
9,448
Location
Maui
I think all styles should evolve. If you see and learn a better way to do something that you do - and don't incorporate it into your art, that seems crazy to me. Why wouldn't you? For the sake of tradition?
 

isshinryuronin

Master Black Belt
Joined
Feb 28, 2019
Messages
1,428
Reaction score
1,425
Location
Las Vegas
I think all styles should evolve. If you see and learn a better way to do something that you do - and don't incorporate it into your art, that seems crazy to me. Why wouldn't you? For the sake of tradition?
Buka, you didn't lead your post with a quote, so since it came right after mine, I'll respond as if you're referring to it. If not, just consider this an extension of my last one.

Nothing wrong with your statement, IF you consider competition a style, and the evolution is "better." Better for whom? The competitors or the "powers that be?"

You're an old guy (like me) who competed when grabs, takedowns, sweeps, groin shots, etc. were the rule. We didn't have to wear XX assoc. approved color coordinated pads and belts, measure how long our gi top came down to the thigh, march like military school cadets or submit to limited techniques and targets. Are such things better for the competitor? If not, then the "tradition" is better than what it has evolved into.

You had promoters like Parker and Banks that were open tournament powers, but they were still individuals (TKD's Rhee did have a loose tournament organization). They did little to bind the competitors into molds and restrict their style. The organizations behind much of the major competition now are different.

It just seems to me that the competitors (and indirectly the art) are being controlled by the sponsoring organizations' templates which really squashes evolution. The practitioners and masters of the art are not the one's instituting the changes, the tournament organizations are. And as in any organization, they function for their own good and existence.

Maybe I'm just being old fashioned, but competition used to be a part of the practitioners' art, not an end to itself. Too many rules and scoring guidelines are restrictive and skew the "natural" evolution of the art to some tournament group's preconceived notion of how it should be. IMO that would be a poor future for TMA.
 
OP
R

RoniSwersky

White Belt
Joined
Oct 5, 2021
Messages
8
Reaction score
0
I can't speak for Karate outside Shotokan. But the reason "You can Find any information" like the infamous Motobo vs the Boxer, there is little or no information that exists of such claims within Shotokan.

Yoshitaka (or Gigo) Funakoshi "DID NOT ADAPT KICKS form Savate. Fact, there is NO evidence what so ever that GIGO developed Mawashi Geri. (read below for who developed Shotokan's Mawashi Geri)

I Love Jesse the Kararte Nurd excitement on Karate...unsure were he gets his information, Clueless on his inability to fact check!!!!

If karate in Japan did draw influence from Western boxing pre WWII it would have been in the Shito Ryu branch or.... the various Okinawan branches in Okinawa. But.. I still think its highly unlikely due to Western Boxing not being all that well known. (Japan and Okinawa was pretty Xenophobic at that time)

Much of the departure from Okinawan Karate to "What we now think of as "Japanese" Karate" stems from Takeshi Shimoda: a Ninpo Taijutsu master, he becomes Funakoshi's best student, his number #1 unfortunately he dies early, in 1934 in his 30s. Shimoda heavily influenced Yoshitaka Funakoshi and others with his infusion of Nimpo Taijustu Yoshitaka Funakoshi took Takeshi sensei's influences and developed them. (the break or the departure all point to Takeshi Shimoda with Yoshitaka Funakoshi picking up the baton after his unexpected death)


Below is Takeshi Shimoda with Funakoshi Sensei)

View attachment 27378


Nakayama Sensei (seen far right)
View attachment 27380

He is the developer of Mawashi Geri and and Ushiro geri. Nakayama Sensei, after he graduated from Takushoku University in 1937 learned the kicks by practicing with Han Chinese (ChangQuan Quan fa... ala Chinese long fist, while in the Military in Manchuria as an interpreter.

Maybe... just maybe... Yoshitaka Funikoshi developed Yojo Geri Keage which appears pretty specific to Shotokan, but IMO... if so ... it's still due to Takeshi Shimoda's influence.

If boxing influences Shotokan it's after WWII in the 50s... and Savate... well there is no records of that ever influencing Shotokan that I have ever come across

Hope this clarifies things
Yes. Thank you. That helps a lot.
 

Buka

Sr. Grandmaster
MT Mentor
Joined
Jun 27, 2011
Messages
12,377
Reaction score
9,448
Location
Maui
Buka, you didn't lead your post with a quote, so since it came right after mine, I'll respond as if you're referring to it. If not, just consider this an extension of my last one.

Nothing wrong with your statement, IF you consider competition a style, and the evolution is "better." Better for whom? The competitors or the "powers that be?"

You're an old guy (like me) who competed when grabs, takedowns, sweeps, groin shots, etc. were the rule. We didn't have to wear XX assoc. approved color coordinated pads and belts, measure how long our gi top came down to the thigh, march like military school cadets or submit to limited techniques and targets. Are such things better for the competitor? If not, then the "tradition" is better than what it has evolved into.

You had promoters like Parker and Banks that were open tournament powers, but they were still individuals (TKD's Rhee did have a loose tournament organization). They did little to bind the competitors into molds and restrict their style. The organizations behind much of the major competition now are different.

It just seems to me that the competitors (and indirectly the art) are being controlled by the sponsoring organizations' templates which really squashes evolution. The practitioners and masters of the art are not the one's instituting the changes, the tournament organizations are. And as in any organization, they function for their own good and existence.

Maybe I'm just being old fashioned, but competition used to be a part of the practitioners' art, not an end to itself. Too many rules and scoring guidelines are restrictive and skew the "natural" evolution of the art to some tournament group's preconceived notion of how it should be. IMO that would be a poor future for TMA.
I completely agree, I really do. But let's take the competition factor out of it. Let's say there are no Martial competitions at all, anywhere, they don't even exist. If you run a school or teach as an assistant, and if somebody shows you something that you have never even had an idea about, and you deem it really important.....

Or if someone shows someone else a much better way to do something that they already do - after the obvious study, learning curve and rigorous testing of what was just shared, how could they not implement it into their style? And it's okay if that someone doesn't have the authority to add to a style/system, at the very least how could they not share it with their students - you know, kind of off the books.
 

Flying Crane

Sr. Grandmaster
Joined
Sep 21, 2005
Messages
14,801
Reaction score
4,334
Location
San Francisco
I completely agree, I really do. But let's take the competition factor out of it. Let's say there are no Martial competitions at all, anywhere, they don't even exist. If you run a school or teach as an assistant, and if somebody shows you something that you have never even had an idea about, and you deem it really important.....

Or if someone shows someone else a much better way to do something that they already do - after the obvious study, learning curve and rigorous testing of what was just shared, how could they not implement it into their style? And it's okay if that someone doesn't have the authority to add to a style/system, at the very least how could they not share it with their students - you know, kind of off the books.
What would be some examples?

My impression (and I could be wrong here) is that a lot of what people tend to think about is techniques or bodies of techniques when they are talking about this kind of thing. Sort of like the whole, you need to include X and Y and Z in your training or your skills are incomplete and you have holes in your training. Often it is the idea that a person training in a primarily striking method needs to add some kind of grappling to their toolkit, and vice-versa.

My personal opinion is that there is very little adherence to tradition purely for the sake of preservation of a historical artifact. I realize there are some old koryu arts for which this is a primary motive, but outside of that I dont believe it is very common. However I do believe that a lot of people may not properly understand how a traditional method should continue to be relevant today.

In my experience, it isnt about the techniques, specifically. Rather, the traditional method is more like a physical education that teaches one to move quickly, powerfully, and efficiently, and how to deliver technique with devastating results. The techniques taught within the method embody the concepts and the principles, but should not be viewed as the content of the method. Rather, they are simply options, among many options.

In this way, once you understand the physical education of it, you can use it to do anything that you want. Including spontaneous reactions, or adapting a body of techniques that were not part of the original training. As long as they function according to the principles of the method, then they have a place within the method.

So a TMA that is properly understood can become anything that one wants it to be, even if that looks different from what others are doing with it. Dont be limited by what you were taught. Dont see the method as establishing limitations. Rather, see it as a platform on which you can build anything that you want.

So then the notion of learning a better way sort of becomes irrelevant because one is always doing just that, insofar as it is compatible with ones personal interests.
 

Steve

Mostly Harmless
Joined
Jul 9, 2008
Messages
20,951
Reaction score
6,419
Location
Covington, WA
Buka, you didn't lead your post with a quote, so since it came right after mine, I'll respond as if you're referring to it. If not, just consider this an extension of my last one.

Nothing wrong with your statement, IF you consider competition a style, and the evolution is "better." Better for whom? The competitors or the "powers that be?"

You're an old guy (like me) who competed when grabs, takedowns, sweeps, groin shots, etc. were the rule. We didn't have to wear XX assoc. approved color coordinated pads and belts, measure how long our gi top came down to the thigh, march like military school cadets or submit to limited techniques and targets. Are such things better for the competitor? If not, then the "tradition" is better than what it has evolved into.

You had promoters like Parker and Banks that were open tournament powers, but they were still individuals (TKD's Rhee did have a loose tournament organization). They did little to bind the competitors into molds and restrict their style. The organizations behind much of the major competition now are different.

It just seems to me that the competitors (and indirectly the art) are being controlled by the sponsoring organizations' templates which really squashes evolution. The practitioners and masters of the art are not the one's instituting the changes, the tournament organizations are. And as in any organization, they function for their own good and existence.

Maybe I'm just being old fashioned, but competition used to be a part of the practitioners' art, not an end to itself. Too many rules and scoring guidelines are restrictive and skew the "natural" evolution of the art to some tournament group's preconceived notion of how it should be. IMO that would be a poor future for TMA.
Whats stopping you guys from organizing and hosting these kinds of competitions? Genuine question
 

isshinryuronin

Master Black Belt
Joined
Feb 28, 2019
Messages
1,428
Reaction score
1,425
Location
Las Vegas
Or if someone shows someone else a much better way to do something that they already do - after the obvious study, learning curve and rigorous testing of what was just shared, how could they not implement it into their style? And it's okay if that someone doesn't have the authority to add to a style/system, at the very least how could they not share it with their students - you know, kind of off the books.
Taking the competition aspect out of the equation leaves the system/style as the star. Evolution will happen over time based on adjustments to make the system more effective, as it has for the past three centuries. However, one just can't willy-nilly add stuff to it or it will become a sloppy MMA and the style will lose any individual identity and cease to exist.

Any changes to the style should be done by one who completely understands it (as by the master, or by other seniors and approved by him). This will insure the new stuff will work harmonious with the style and truly be an improvement. Is it OK for an instructor to teach other handy self-defense stuff? Sure. I agree with you. Being "off the books" is fine, as long it is made known and kept separate.

Tradition vs pragmatism must be well balanced. If pragmatism alone is used as a standard, knife and gun skills would become a part of the style and we'd all be second rate SEALs, for example. Keeping tradition will pass on the history and the "do" (path) part and keep the art as something more than just fighting. This idea is not new. Kung fu has a long history of Taoist influence, the Samurai had their own styles and codes, and even the grandfather of karate, "Bushi" (Warrior) Matsumura in the mid-late 1800's passed on the Seven Virtues of Bu.

It boils down to one's own personal view of MA, or more specifically, TMA. We all choose what's important to us in life, to improve ourselves in ways that best fit us. For some, "the way" is the main thing; for others, being fit and healthy is; for others, pure fighting ability is the goal. For some, like me, it's all three.

Luckily, there are systems and schools out there that offer a variety of arts and skills. No need to rank them as to value, except in relation to ourselves.
 

isshinryuronin

Master Black Belt
Joined
Feb 28, 2019
Messages
1,428
Reaction score
1,425
Location
Las Vegas
Whats stopping you guys from organizing and hosting these kinds of competitions? Genuine question
Got $20,000 you'd like to contribute? I'll make you an Associate Director. :)

Actually there still are some of those traditional tourneys around, but are harder to find, especially bigger ones. The trend seems to be in the other direction I talked about. Hope it doesn't squeeze out the "old" style tournaments still around.
 
Top