Weight training: one set or three?

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Kirk

Guest
Weight training: one set or three?

Does performing multiple sets when strength training yield better
results? Or can a shorter, one-set regimen suffice?

Q1: I have heard that performing
one set of 8 to 12 repetitions during
weightlifting is as good as three
sets. Is that true?

Q2: What is the ideal
combination of reps and sets when
strength training?

A: Adhering to the no pain-no
gain adage, personal trainers have
long advised people to perform three
sets 8 to 12 repetitions each of
weightlifting exercises. But there is
mounting evidence to suggest that
most people, and not only beginners,
may get just as much benefit from a
one-set training regimen and save
time, too.

One such study, published
earlier this year in Medicine &
Science in Sports & Exercise, a
journal of the American College of
Sports Medicine, looked at 42 people
ages 20 to 50 who had been performing
one set of a nine-exercise circuit
three times a week for at least one
year. For the study, half of the
participants were asked to increase
their sets from one to three for each
exercise, which included leg curls,
chest presses and biceps curls.

When results were analyzed 13
weeks later, both groups saw similar
improvements in their muscle
strength, endurance and body
composition.

DIMINISHING RETURNS?
Weve been taught to do more
and more for so long. But a one-set
training regimen is a valid,
effective method for weight training
for most people, said study author
Chris Hass, an exercise science
researcher at the University of
Florida in Gainesville.

Source:
http://www.msnbc.com/news/455698.asp#BODY
 
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J

Jill666

Guest
Boy that would be nice if true-

I wouldn't mind. I wonder if it matters in terms of building mass vs. endurance (fast-twitch & slow twitch muscle fiber etc). Looks like they factored that into the study.

The other thing I wonder is if people who do one set would be more prone to injury. For instance, I know my weight limit if I am going to do three sets of 12 reps. If I did just one set, I could easily take higher weight. But would my body really be ready for that weight? Would the muscles and related structures be at increased risk?

Also, who are these people. Do they lift, then train, or do they lift, take a sauna & go home. I wonder of a MA would be happy with the results. I imagine you could get bulk from one set of a full circut on a regular basis, but is that the desired result? These people may just want to get off the couch and look vaguely better then before.

Just my immediate thoughts.:rolleyes:
 
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K

Kirk

Guest
Great points Jill! On the page, there's an email address where
you can ask more questions. I'm curious too!
 

jfarnsworth

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You know, I think you can go to www.flexonline.com and ask the pros the questions on their forum. I've never done it but I did read it a couple of times in some past issues that someone could do this. When I try to work say the hamstring muscle using a couple of warm up sets with lighter weight gives good results. 2 warm up sets with lighter weight going to 15 -20 reps then, I (personally) do 3 heavier sets from 8 - 10.
Kirk your better off asking your questions to a personal trainer. Everyone on here can give you advice about a specific work out but it may not suit you or your needs and the results you want.:asian:
 
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Shinobi

Guest
I reccomend doing 3 sets of 8-10 on each exersize. Personally I do more then that (6 sets of 8 on average) but that's me. 3x8-10 should work.
 
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RCastillo

Guest
Originally posted by Shinobi
I reccomend doing 3 sets of 8-10 on each exersize. Personally I do more then that (6 sets of 8 on average) but that's me. 3x8-10 should work.

I do four, because I wanna stay ahead of the hooded one, SHINOBI!:cool:
 
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Shinobi

Guest
Personally I do more then that (6 sets of 8 on average)


Still behind my grasshopper.


Now, Mr. Farnsworth, I do that so I can one day have the body of Scott Steiner. Maybe THEN all my clients will wanna hire me for top secret Assassinations in the African jungles again.
 
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RCastillo

Guest
Originally posted by Shinobi
Still behind my grasshopper.


Now, Mr. Farnsworth, I do that so I can one day have the body of Scott Steiner. Maybe THEN all my clients will wanna hire me for top secret Assassinations in the African jungles again.

That, or "BOOTY CALLS!":rofl:
 
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Shinobi

Guest
Just for that, you will wax the floods of the Temple with a toothbrush at 3AM SHARP!



You trainees never learn.
 
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RCastillo

Guest
Originally posted by Kirk
Weight training: one set or three?

Does performing multiple sets when strength training yield better
results? Or can a shorter, one-set regimen suffice?

Q1: I have heard that performing
one set of 8 to 12 repetitions during
weightlifting is as good as three
sets. Is that true?

Q2: What is the ideal
combination of reps and sets when
strength training?

A: Adhering to the no pain-no
gain adage, personal trainers have
long advised people to perform three
sets 8 to 12 repetitions each of
weightlifting exercises. But there is
mounting evidence to suggest that
most people, and not only beginners,
may get just as much benefit from a
one-set training regimen and save
time, too.

One such study, published
earlier this year in Medicine &
Science in Sports & Exercise, a
journal of the American College of
Sports Medicine, looked at 42 people
ages 20 to 50 who had been performing
one set of a nine-exercise circuit
three times a week for at least one
year. For the study, half of the
participants were asked to increase
their sets from one to three for each
exercise, which included leg curls,
chest presses and biceps curls.

When results were analyzed 13
weeks later, both groups saw similar
improvements in their muscle
strength, endurance and body
composition.

DIMINISHING RETURNS?
Weve been taught to do more
and more for so long. But a one-set
training regimen is a valid,
effective method for weight training
for most people, said study author
Chris Hass, an exercise science
researcher at the University of
Florida in Gainesville.

Source:
http://www.msnbc.com/news/455698.asp#BODY

Kirk, it'll work better if you stay off the roids!:eek:
 
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RCastillo

Guest
Originally posted by Shinobi
Just for that, you will wax the floods of the Temple with a toothbrush at 3AM SHARP!



You trainees never learn.

Do you provide em?
 
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Shinobi

Guest
*hands you Master of Blades power rangers toothbrush* get to scrubbin'.
 
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RCastillo

Guest
Originally posted by Shinobi
*hands you Master of Blades power rangers toothbrush* get to scrubbin'.

Cool, my birthday comes early this year!:boing2:
 
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RyuShiKan

Guest
Here is a website I found that is really comprehensive.
They have several good workouts for different goals, and explain how to use each one. For example when you go to the basic workout, it will calculate your one rep max (bottom of page), and then you go to the printable version of this form, enter in your maxs for each lift and it will figure how many sets and how much weight to use on each set based on your one rep max.
Also at the bottom left hand corner of that page there is submit button that will figure your program for up to 6 weeks.

http://216.234.190.174/
 
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Elfan

Guest
Originally posted by RyuShiKan
Here is a website I found that is really comprehensive.
They have several good workouts for different goals, and explain how to use each one. For example when you go to the basic workout, it will calculate your one rep max (bottom of page), and then you go to the printable version of this form, enter in your maxs for each lift and it will figure how many sets and how much weight to use on each set based on your one rep max.
Also at the bottom left hand corner of that page there is submit button that will figure your program for up to 6 weeks.

http://216.234.190.174/

I would be *VERY* cautious with advice from a site that has "Legal Mail Order Steroid Suppliers" and "The Steroid Bible."
 
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