Traditional Tae Kwon Do

Azulx

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My school teaches traditional Tae Kwon Do, we use the Ch'ang Hon family for forms (Chon-ji to Chong-moo, Kwang-gae to Tong-il) except I noticed that my instructor teaches them slightly diffenrent than the ITF. We are not ITF affiliated. The difference is that the ITF turns counter-clockwise when they are changing direction, our instructors teaches us to turn clockwise, because that is the fastest way to strike your opponent. Does anyone else have an instructor that changes the way one spins in a form form the original pattern? Is this wrong to do?
 

Tez3

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.......... I noticed that my instructor teaches them slightly diffenrent than the ITF. We are not ITF affiliated........

Doesn't that answer your own question? If you aren't affiliated to a group or organisation why should you do what they do?
 

Buka

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What is the only function of a kick? Keep that in mind as you explore the differences and nuances of the clockwise and counter clockwise question.

Then go kick your sparring partners. Repeatedly. Your instructor will be pleased. You might like it, too. :)
 

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What is the only function of a kick? Keep that in mind as you explore the differences and nuances of the clockwise and counter clockwise question.

Then go kick your sparring partners. Repeatedly. Your instructor will be pleased. You might like it, too. :)

I REALLY love this answer. As long as you are fluent in your martial art and its techniques that's all that matters.
 

Dirty Dog

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My school teaches traditional Tae Kwon Do, we use the Ch'ang Hon family for forms (Chon-ji to Chong-moo, Kwang-gae to Tong-il) except I noticed that my instructor teaches them slightly diffenrent than the ITF. We are not ITF affiliated. The difference is that the ITF turns counter-clockwise when they are changing direction, our instructors teaches us to turn clockwise, because that is the fastest way to strike your opponent. Does anyone else have an instructor that changes the way one spins in a form form the original pattern? Is this wrong to do?

If you're part of an organization, you train to their standards. If you're independent, you do whatever you want.
However, I personally disagree with changing the directions of the turns.
Tul are not choreographed fights. They're methods of teaching an entire encyclopedia of techniques.
One thing you get from the turns, as they were originally described, is practice turning. You know, like you will for turning kicks. It improves your balance and footwork.
If your instructor is teaching you to treat tul as choreographed fights, I can't help but question their understanding of the forms.
 
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Azulx

Azulx

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If you're part of an organization, you train to their standards. If you're independent, you do whatever you want.
However, I personally disagree with changing the directions of the turns.
Tul are not choreographed fights. They're methods of teaching an entire encyclopedia of techniques.
One thing you get from the turns, as they were originally described, is practice turning. You know, like you will for turning kicks. It improves your balance and footwork.
If your instructor is teaching you to treat tul as choreographed fights, I can't help but question their understanding of the forms.

I believe my instructor was taught to turn the opposite way of the Chang Hon forms as well. You might be right he may not have a profound understanding of forms, but what where you taught or/teach is the significance of the way you spin?
 

dancingalone

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I believe my instructor was taught to turn the opposite way of the Chang Hon forms as well.

You are shortening the circle when you change the spin to a direct one. Yes, it is less distance to travel and may allow you to respond quicker to an attack in a new direction. However, it can be useful to think about what the purpose in practicing a longer spin/turn is....

I have bb rank in aikido as well, so imagine my thought process from that angle.
 
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Azulx

Azulx

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If your instructor is teaching you to treat tul as choreographed fights, I can't help but question their understanding of the forms.

My instructor teaches all forms as choreographed fights, but if they aren't choreographed fights than what are they?
 

WaterGal

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My instructor teaches all forms as choreographed fights, but if they aren't choreographed fights than what are they?

They're training exercises, to practice various martial arts techniques, develop balance, etc. From what I've read, it sounds like forms were invented as a way to remember and practice your martial arts skills when you're by yourself.

Some of the moves may flow together in a sequence that would be useful in a fight, but the whole thing isn't one giant fight against like 6 different guys the way people say.
 
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Azulx

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They're training exercises, to practice various martial arts techniques, develop balance, etc. From what I've read, it sounds like forms were invented as a way to remember and practice your martial arts skills when you're by yourself.

So, basically the martial arts equivalent to shadow boxing?
 

Dirty Dog

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My instructor teaches all forms as choreographed fights, but if they aren't choreographed fights than what are they?

They are a tool to teach balance, movement, techniques, and the principles underlying those techniques. Each of the techniques in the forms is applicable to specific circumstances, and many combinations can also be applied in specific "real world" situations.
What they are not, is "OK, I am going to punch this guy in the nose, which will cause his brain to implode, then I'm going to turn to the next guy..."
Now, I do find it useful to imagine an opponent as the target for the techniques in the forms, as a way of understanding HOW they can be applied, but that's not the same thing as a choreographed fight.
 

JR 137

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While performing kata, I picture one opponent. If I turn, it's because I threw, dragged, or joint locked him there. The attacks can start or end at pretty much any count of the kata. One technique can flow into the next if need be, it can be the start, or the end.

When looked at this way, a simple turn and low block can become an arm bar while using your movement to move your opponent in the direction you're turning.

Kind of hard to describe without video.
 

Enrique Becwar

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Each school that is not affiliated with one association verses another doesn't matter as long as they have a good foundation and you pratice a lot :). that being said. The only problem I think I would find by changing the turns would be if you enter a competition with ITF rules, then you would get points taken off.
 
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