thai boxing

overunder

Yellow Belt
Joined
Jan 22, 2009
Messages
27
Reaction score
0
Location
dunstable
just started tonghit.
for many reasons. mainly to gain confidence, so i dont freeeze up ever again.
it is very fun!
i loved the sparring. much more than using the pads and stuff to practice, i still enjoyed that, and i think that is a very important part of the lesson aswell.
but sparring is very fun.
one prblem. anyone know how to overcome the instinct to flinch? :D thanks
what are your views on that boxing?
 
Last edited:

just2kicku

Black Belt
Lifetime Supporting Member
Joined
Jan 19, 2009
Messages
691
Reaction score
35
Location
SoCal
just started tonghit.
for many reasons. mainly to gain confidence, so i dont freeeze up ever again.
it is very fun!
i loved the sparring. much more than using the pads and stuff to practice, i still enjoyed that, and i think that is a very important part of the lesson aswell.
but sparring is very fun.
one prblem. anyone know how to overcome the instinct to flinch? :D thanks
what are your views on that boxing?


What I think of Thai Boxing, or any other art for that matter, is that you will get out of it what you are willing to put into it. All arts have something to offer, a person just needs to be willing to take the extra time and work at it.
As far as the flinching, well, I think that's just something that goes away after time. Good luck and keep us posted on how it's going.
Joe
 

seasoned

MT Senior Moderator
Staff member
Lifetime Supporting Member
Joined
Apr 19, 2007
Messages
11,250
Reaction score
1,227
Location
Lives in Texas
just started tonghit.
for many reasons. mainly to gain confidence, so i dont freeeze up ever again.
it is very fun!
i loved the sparring. much more than using the pads and stuff to practice, i still enjoyed that, and i think that is a very important part of the lesson aswell.
but sparring is very fun.
one prblem. anyone know how to overcome the instinct to flinch? :D thanks
what are your views on that boxing?



The more you concentrate on your opponent, the less you will flinch. It is a matter of distinguishing between a fake technique or a real one from your opponent. It will take time and practice.
 

strikesubmit

Yellow Belt
Joined
Jan 30, 2009
Messages
36
Reaction score
1
Location
Chi-town
just started tonghit.
for many reasons. mainly to gain confidence, so i dont freeeze up ever again.
it is very fun!
i loved the sparring. much more than using the pads and stuff to practice, i still enjoyed that, and i think that is a very important part of the lesson aswell.
but sparring is very fun.
one prblem. anyone know how to overcome the instinct to flinch? :D thanks
what are your views on that boxing?

the instinct to flinch will slowly fade as time and training go on.

my girlfriend also had that same habit when she first started training in it with me, but now, it's all but gone.

you guys will probably be working more and more on "hard" defense (i.e. covering, absorbing the impact) as well as staying "in the pocket." and you'll see that you'll start getting used to having strikes come your way.

you will also be working on "soft" defense (i.e. slipping, bobbing, etc.), but even that is more of conscious effort to elude strikes as opposed to flinching.

anywho, good luck with your training!

i personally LOVE Muay Thai. i transitioned to it after taking karate. i find that it's a simple yet very effective striking art.
 

David Weatherly

Black Belt
Joined
Dec 15, 2008
Messages
517
Reaction score
4
As others have stated, time and practice will help you move beyond the flinch response.
Enjoy your training!
 

Latest Discussions

Top