Teaching out of the home

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SifuAnderson

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Just fishing for thoughts here. what does everybody think about teaching out of the home. Does it look to unprofessional. And what is the best way to draw students. asking on personal opinions of course.
 
I used to teach out of the home, but I found a few issues the came up. One, space was limited. Two, life kept interupting. Three, it's pretty discouraging when you only have one or two students and you expect them to show up and they don't. Four, unless you already know your students well, do you really want to open your home to them?
 
I would have to agree with Seig. Do you really want to open up your home to someone you don't know. Another point close to this is if they get hurt bad they could sue you and own everything you have.
Bob :asian:
 
Isn't that what a waiver is for. and another thing, what is a good way to start your first school. I mean, I train in a style that most people have never heard of so I cannot advertise off of name alone.
 
I have had home school a few times. Everything was done in the front or back yards. People going by could see us and they would sooner or later come back if they had any intrest just to ask questions, if nothing else.
It was messy when it rained but fun. Snow would force us to find a garage or attic to practice in.
Haveing a home school keeps the class size small. Good for teaching and building a base/core of students till you open a school in a large building. Poor for reasons already given (nobody showing up).

Shadow:asian:
 
Originally posted by tshadowchaser

I have had home school a few times. Everything was done in the front or back yards.
Shadow:asian:

I have a 40' by 80' cement slab in the front yard. It is perfect for training. however for suagiau and sparring I would take the students to the back yard where it is much softer. rain is not a prob. however right now here in tx we could probably do under water training in the back yard.(only in san antone). snow I really dont think that there will be a problem with.:samurai: :samurai: :yinyang: :yinyang: :armed: :karate:
 
when i first starting teaching i started out of my home. It's an ideal situation in some cases, like no overhead,you control the fees etc. i teach my students to be warriors, with strong mental and physical strength. we would train regardless of weather, i've had classes in the rain and below freezing temperatures and even with snow up to our knees, when your students show up every class in these type of conditions you know there serious about training. Even today with teaching out of a commercial school,colleges, and health clubs i will on occasion take everyone outside to test ther determination. my purpose in this is simple, we must learn to adapt out skills to all enviroments. if your used to doing your kicks and punches barefooted on a hardwood floor with air conditioning flowing all around you what happens when your attacked and your in the rain, snow, ice and your wearing jeans and tennis shoes, will you adapt, my students know the awnser to these questions
 
it can work if you already have a student base. If you've got three or four people who are willing to refer other people to you, go for it. when you get fifteen or 20, then you can move somewhere larger.
 
Originally posted by SifuAnderson

Isn't that what a waiver is for.

Be very careful, and be aware that I'm no laywer. I'm not sure about your state, but many waivers won't stand up in court if there's evidence of misconduct. This is usually defined as what deviates from the "norm" for the industry, as if you can define such a thing. Anyways, I've been warned that waivers are only there to make the student aware of the risks and potential dangers that are inherent to the training (such as broken bones and such). They're less likely to sue if something happens that they knew might.

But, as an example, suppose you spar without gloves and someone gets their jaw broken from a punch. They can still sue succesfully if most of the schools in your area wear gloves in their sparring. Even though your waiver said they might get hurt, and they knew it going in, it can be seen as misconduct on your part for not providing the protection.

[QUTOE] I train in a style that most people have never heard of so I cannot advertise off of name alone. [/QUOTE]

Most schools make the mistake of putting their obscure name in their advertising. The general public doesn't know or care about a specific style or the rank of the instructor. They're just looking for a school and an instructor that meets their specific needs. Address these needs in your advertisement and perhaps say it's Kung Fu or whatever. Each person has an expectation of what the general art is. It's your job to get them in the door so that you can *show* them what your specific art can do for them. One big thing you've got over the competition is the one-on-one level of committment that you can give your students. Emphasize the more private/personal nature of your training. You're teaching them directly and you only have a few in the class. As you know, some schools can have as many at 20-30 people in a class.

NAPMA (www.napma.com) has other things that they say you should consider as well such as intro classes and a money-back guarantee for 1 month to let people try the class without thinking they have to make a big leap up front.

You might look into NAPMA . They've done a lot for the business side of my school that I never thought about before and are on-call for these kind of questions.

WhiteBirch
 
Originally posted by Seig

I used to teach out of the home, but I found a few issues the came up. One, space was limited. Two, life kept interupting. Three, it's pretty discouraging when you only have one or two students and you expect them to show up and they don't. Four, unless you already know your students well, do you really want to open your home to them?

Yep, same here.:(
 
Originally posted by SifuAnderson
Just fishing for thoughts here. what does everybody think about teaching out of the home. Does it look to unprofessional. And what is the best way to draw students. asking on personal opinions of course.

From a students perspective, over the last 6 yrs I've been exclusively trained in a garage setting and at the beginning definitely something to get used to. I was formally dojo trained for 11 yr prior. I remember bowing before approaching the training area (garage) and my instructor saying don't worry about that. I recall space issues at times (too many people, not enough space), it was weird to sometimes have his youngest out there with us playing on the side, when sparring you could run into things, when it was cold we trained in shoes, gi tops and belts were almost never worn, we always fought the elements (cold, heat and sometimes mosquitoses) and people often came and went because of the pace and rigger of the training (we trained hard, very hard), and sometimes I felt things were left out that shouldn't be (formalities, forms (that I already knew), certain basics for the beginners).

With all of that let me add what I felt like I got out of it as a student. I found it easier for me to train at my house, I was no longer mentally tied to only training at the dojo, right now I can drop trou and train anywhere (that requires a mental adjustment that comes with garage or park training), I saw that I could build up my own training area at home and how to do it. All the classes were normally small so I got more individual attention, classes normally ran longer, I learned how to train in shoes, I was no longer a slave to belt ranking (it was there, but not as important), I saw how a person could intergrate Kenpo into their family life, I was closer to my instructor than in a normal class setting and felt like part of the family (this a a pro and con, particularly when you want to leave to train else where). I learned to train in the elements and in my conditioning was generally better then in the big school. For an instructor who is good, but not really business minded this is an optimal situation because it only requires the time and space issue. One thing as a student that I didn't like was that I didn't see my dollars going to bettering the training area (mats, new focus mitts, etc...). In the 5 yrs I was there I don't recall us getting any new equipment for the dojo (garage), well 2 wavemasters, but those were part of a trade and not bought from our dues. He did have a little bit already, but there was so much room for improvement.



That's all the feedback I can think of right now.

jb:asian:
 
Great posts folks, If someone is looking for a school(like in the movies or on tv) thats what their going look for ,but when they later want a teacher it won't matter if is a large Gym or you living room. They will find you like it or not. that could be good and bad.

Paul Dye has taught out of his garage for 30 years and the skill level of his students is well known.I hope some of you ask him about some of the garage stories if you ever have the chance.

Do wat you love, love what you do and do it where ever you have to and keep sharing, it will bo cool:D


Respectfully Dan Brady
 
I have been very fortunate in that this last year I have had a room rent free. My senior assistant has ownership of a vacant building and supplied a place for our dojo at no cost. However, the building will soon be coming down completely for renovations.

I am in the process of preparing my garage to be our new location. I don't teach children or many citizens. My normal students are military, LEO, EP or security. For those of you training in this type of setting, or teaching out of your garage, what pointers could you advise me in.

Thank you in advance. :) :asian:
 
Originally posted by Mya Ryu Jitsu
I have been very fortunate in that this last year I have had a room rent free. My senior assistant has ownership of a vacant building and supplied a place for our dojo at no cost. However, the building will soon be coming down completely for renovations.

I am in the process of preparing my garage to be our new location. I don't teach children or many citizens. My normal students are military, LEO, EP or security. For those of you training in this type of setting, or teaching out of your garage, what pointers could you advise me in.

Thank you in advance. :) :asian:
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I take it you will be paid for your services. I would suggest you be paid up front because people have a tendancy to flake out, and not show up. Nothing can be more frustrating in to have everything set up, be ready, and they fail to show. This will prove if they're serious about their investment.

I's not about being greedy, but just to show that if you're serious, they should be as well.

Thanks:asian:
 
Ihave to agree with Ricardo. Make some kind of deposit required or you stand a very good chance of training alone. The deposit does not guarantee they will show, but it does make it more likely.
 
i dont think its unprofessional. i use to do my private lessons on the weekends at my home when i was single. i did them after i had kids, but my mother made me realize i have a responsibility to protect my family, and you never really know your students and what kind of people they are.

if you have children or a wife, i would not invite strangers (including students you knew for a few months) to your home.
 
Originally posted by thekuntawman
i dont think its unprofessional. i use to do my private lessons on the weekends at my home when i was single. i did them after i had kids, but my mother made me realize i have a responsibility to protect my family, and you never really know your students and what kind of people they are.

if you have children or a wife, i would not invite strangers (including students you knew for a few months) to your home.

Yep, I did the same thing my wife said the same thing. A shame, but the reasoning is correct:asian:
 
Originally posted by thekuntawman
i dont think its unprofessional. i use to do my private lessons on the weekends at my home when i was single. i did them after i had kids, but my mother made me realize i have a responsibility to protect my family, and you never really know your students and what kind of people they are.

if you have children or a wife, i would not invite strangers (including students you knew for a few months) to your home.

I'll just say that not everyone has the same beliefs as the past couple of submissions and that I try to take peoples comments within context of what they know and what they think they know.

Wives and mothers are supposed to make such comments to keep us in check and to make sure you stay alert to such things. As my wife says, "Stranger Danger". But she (mother/wife) isn't there to see the yrs of training that has allowed you to offer such a service. If you are proficient, the last guy in the world that potential student/psycho is going to want to jack with is you. Also you should have enough sense to do some telephone/internet screening prior to inviting someone over. And have the sense to start them on a probationary period to see if they are the right fit. Another advantage to the garage thing.. If you aren't depending on that check from each new guy to help pay some bills you won't compromise your family's safety or your principles.

In regards to the deposit thing....that is silly to me. Karate is a recreational luxury activity. Nobody has to take Karate. If they aren't going to come to that initial meeting, what is going to make them come to normal class? Or at that point does it not matter since they are paying monthly? Just tell them up front, if you can't make it call me in advance by Tuesday if we are meeting Wednesday. If you don't, and you don't show up I assume your not serious and don't respect my time and it won't be a good to train together. The garage guys that aren't worried about keeping the lights on with students' dues can take or leave a person. Just my opinions...

jb:asian:
 

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