Stupid Kukishin BikenJutsu Question.

Cryozombie

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Are the techniques in Kukishinden Ryu Bikenjutsu such as Kocho Gaeshi Sayu Gyaku and Tuski Wa Sayu Gyaku, etc... Kata or Henka?

And while I am on the subject, What does Sayu Gyaku mean?

Thanks.
 

Chris Parker

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Hi,

The easy part first... Sayu Gyaku means "both sides"; literally, "left" (sa), "right" (yu), "reverse" (gyaku). As for kata or henka, I was first taught them (and continue to teach them) as kata, but I have also seen them presented as henka to the main kata (Kocho Gaeshi, Tsuki no Wa, Kiri Age, Kiri Sage, etc). If I remember correctly, Hatsumi Sensei's book on Kenjutsu (Japanese Sowrd Fighting - Secrets of the Samurai) gives on average three "sayu gyaku" henka to each primary technique. I would suggest that would be a good place to start to make up your own mind, coupled with the Ken, Tachi, Katana DVD, which covers the majority of the Kukishin Biken syllabus.
 

Aiki Lee

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Aren't Henka a kind of kata? I always assumed a henka was an "aggressive" kata as in the kata is meant for attacking as opposed to countering or defending.
 

Kreth

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Aren't Henka a kind of kata? I always assumed a henka was an "aggressive" kata as in the kata is meant for attacking as opposed to countering or defending.
A henka is a variation of a kata. Say you're doing something like Koku from Gyokko ryu, which deals with a right-hand punch followed by a right foot stomp kick. A henka could be dealing with a right-hand punch then a left foot kick, or a left-hand punch, or using a hanbo, etc.
 

Chris Parker

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Hi,

Yeah, as Kreth said, henka is variation (lit. Hen = change, Ka = become, change into). So any change to a movement, or kata, is henka. That of course includes more offensive applications of the principles of a particular technique. And that means that any one interpretation of a kata could be considered a henka in and of itself... I'm sure you would have noticed that even the same kata demonstrated by the same people at different times can be almost completely different. The exploration of these changes, or variations, can become a major aspect of your development. Just remember not to limit yourself to just offensive variations as the only ones you explore.
 

Aiki Lee

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Thank you for your replies. Up and until now I had only heard the word henka used once so I drew a wrong conclusion about its meaning. Thanks for your help.
 

Shizen Shigoku

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I'll have to dig up my old notes to see those particular kata to be sure, but in my general experience, when a kata has "sayu" after its name, it means it has a left side and a right side variation.
 
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