Strength for Judo

fightingpower

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I have recently started a weight training regime under a weight lifting colleague of mine and found the results to be very imppresive. Like most Martial Artists I never had much time for pure strnegth training as I believed technique was everything. But I must admit that the improvements I have made on the Judo mat are qauntifiable and recognisable. Judo is a good Art to test this out on as it has a measured way of fighting. The truth is I can throw people now that I coudn't a short time ago. Or at least with some more ease. My ground game isa slowly improving to.

I am not saying that strength is the be and end all but I would like to put this question to this forum............

Couldn't you benefit from being stronger....It certainly wouldn't do you any harm.....

Any opinions would be appreciated, this is a good discussion topic and I think we can dispell some myths about weight training in our Arts!

Thanks
 

jarrod

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it's good to be strong, period. strength has this weird stigma in many martial arts. stamina is good, flexibility is good, speed is good, strength is good. it's no secret, & fighters from every culture have sought to improve their strength. for a long time it was believed that weight training would make you slow, but this has been proven to be simply untrue.

also, judo in particular isn't about not using strength...it's about using the strength you have efficiently. so if you have correct throwing technique, pinning technique, gripping technique or whatever, that technique will be easier to execute with power if you are strong.

jf
 

lklawson

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I've found that frequently people are more interested in the tradition of their martial art. That is to say that if their art has "traditional" methods of strength conditioning, they'll embrace that but they're far less likely to use modern weight lifting methods.

In example, there was an article in a recent Black Belt Mag. about strengthening the wrists for Karate. The author spent a fair bit of ink on (supposedly) traditional Okinawan methods such as back-of-hand pushups and stones-on-a-stick. He went on about how great these methods were for building up the wrists and the like but didn't spend any time recommending modern training methods.

For myself, I've seen some of this illogical response as well. I find that I'm far more likely to be interested in using the Karl Gotch Bible, Strongfort's system, Farmer Burns' methods, or something from Sandow than to go to a modern gym and employ a professional Weight Trainer, despite the fact that I am fairly certain that modern methods may lead to results somewhat faster. (Or maybe not, I've not really tested it imperically.)

However, there's something very attractive emotionally about using the same conditioning methods that "the old timers" used. Good enough for Edwards or Hackenschmidt, good enough for me. Know what I mean?

So, while most agree that being stronger would be beneficial, there's some deep emotional response involved as well. Almost like it's not being "true" to the "Art" or the tradition or something to include modern weight training. It's "sportifying" your art or something. It's not surprising considering the true reasons that most people get involved in Martial Arts (which are, frequently, highly emotional reasons and not 'self defense' as is frequently claimed).

There are some venues which seem less resistant, however. Most of them have some sort of popular sporting expression. Judo, Boxing, Wrestling, BJJ, MMA, etc. When a person is highly competitive and looking to gain even the smallest edge for his upcomming competition... Well, he looks at a "traditional" method and then modern methods and thinks, "I can train traditionally for 6 weeks or I can make the same gains with modern methods in 4 weeks... hmmm..." Yeah. No contest.

Peace favor your sword,
Kirk
 

CuongNhuka

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Personnaly, I advocate a mix of Crossfit, Isometrics, and running. Crossfit is functional movements done at a high intensity. Normally, I do Isometrics as a warm up and cool down, and alternate between Crossfit and Running as my conditioning. The HIT program is good also before a competition.

I've noticed that Crossfit et al, does give a bit more power to the execution of throws.
 

fightingpower2

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Personnaly, I advocate a mix of Crossfit, Isometrics, and running. Crossfit is functional movements done at a high intensity. Normally, I do Isometrics as a warm up and cool down, and alternate between Crossfit and Running as my conditioning. The HIT program is good also before a competition.

I've noticed that Crossfit et al, does give a bit more power to the execution of throws.


Crossfit seems like fun - what's your Crossfit total ?

The training fightingpower and I do is all basic barbell stuff on the basis that if you're going to anything where you need to apply force (martial arts) then the more force at yor disposal, the better.
 

CuongNhuka

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Crossfit seems like fun - what's your Crossfit total ?

I don't have the weights at home to do a CFT, I don't make nearly enough to join a gym, and I hate going to the Air base by my house to go to the gym (the MP's give me weird looks when show them Military ID). I just use my Marine standards, and call it a day.
 

JudoJunkie

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I am a small, female judo player and one of the most valuable lessons that one of my instructors gave me was to appreciate strength. I have belts in Judo and Aikido and I have discovered that the right application of strength can increase the effectiveness of any technique. I have also learned to be wary of my opponenets strength. Technique can overcome power most of the time, but I would hate to get into a bad situation with a large, powerful man. One mistake. . . . So off to the gym I go!
 

lklawson

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I am a small, female judo player and one of the most valuable lessons that one of my instructors gave me was to appreciate strength. I have belts in Judo and Aikido and I have discovered that the right application of strength can increase the effectiveness of any technique. I have also learned to be wary of my opponenets strength. Technique can overcome power most of the time, but I would hate to get into a bad situation with a large, powerful man. One mistake. . . . So off to the gym I go!
Yeah. That's one of the lies the Martial Arts world in general likes to tell people: "Size doesn't matter." SUUUURRREEE it doesn't. That's why there are weight devisions in Boxing, Judo, Wrestling, MMA, etc. Because "size doesn't matter."

Yes, skill CAN best size (tack on whatever stipulations make you comfortable), but the concept that one can just quickly learn this or that and, bang, size is now irrelevant is complete bull. Skill takes practice and understanding. It's not a "quick trick."

Peace favor your sword,
Kirk
 

fightingpower2

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Great and positive replies - now all we have to do is tell all the other martial arts !

My training is solely weights but I've been involved in very many street confrontations (let's call them) and my experience shows the difficult people to deal with are :

  • Skilled fighters
  • Drug or drink strong
  • Mentally ill strong
  • Aggressive (for another reason)
  • Strong
When fightingpower and I talked I struggled with the general martial arts concept that using weights is bad and will make you a poorer fighter.
 

matt.m

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Well,

Functional strength is a good thing to have in judo. Do a lot for shoulders, back, and triceps. Before my major injuries I did a lot of deadlifting. I loved doing them. If 2 people are equal in technique, the stronger will win.
 
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