So i got hit with a spinning backfist today...

-steve-

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Yeah, title says it all. Me and my partner were doing drills with the tai pads, the drill involved a spinning back fist at the end. He forgot to look over his shoulder, and BAM I eat the back of his glove. It hurt, but not as much as I would have imagined, thank god he wasnt very good at bakc fists.
No hard feelings. Anyways, lately i've been hurting my wrists when I hit the heavy bag, I love throwing hooks for some reason, and i seem to be injuring my wrists. I wrap them up. Today I wrapped them much further down my wrist then normal and that seemed to help a little bit, I fear my wrists may be to feeble haha, any ideas how i can strenghthen them? are wrist push ups safe they look kinda dangerous?

I just have one more concern, I play guitar you see and I was wondering, will punching things in MT like give me arthritis or anything like that cuz i love guitar and need my fingers to be very nimble to continue playing at the level I'm at now. Wow, It seems I put comas in places they dont belong, well at least I organized it in sorta paragraphs. That is all folks thanks for reading about my feeble wrists, my nimble fingers and my backfist absorbing face.
 

David43515

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First, sorry about taking one to the noggin. Been there, done that, and it sucks.

Second,keep your wrist straight when you throw those hooks. Only bend your elbow, keep it tight, and throw from the shoulder and waist.

And I would avoid doing pushups on your wrists (or the backs of your hands if I`m understanding you correctly). It can be done, but would actually stretch your wrists. You want stability, not flexability. Push ups on your knuckles, like you`re punching the ground, strengthen the wrists.(You can elevate your upper body to reduce the weight involved if you need to.) So do wrist curls, reverse wrist curls, and holding a weight while making circles in the air by moving just the wrist.
 

Phenom

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Hurting your wrists is kind of part and parcel with MT training. Even when you get great form you will still tweak them once in a while. The advice on keeping your wrists straight and using your hips and shoulders to power your hook is great advice. Also watch the alignment of your elbow to your fist. Whatever direction the punch is going, your elbow should be behind it. If your hook is going straight across, your elbow should be at the same height as your fist!!! That piece of advice has fixed many a hook where I'm from. Get your Kru to look at your hook and tell you why he/she thinks your wrist may be tweaking. Also, once you hurt it in a session, go light for the rest of that day or until it feels better. It will never heal if you keep damaging it.

Cheers
 

blackxpress

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That's a nasty technique. When I first started sparring I accidentally landed one to the side of my Sensei's head and nearly knocked him out. He was wearing head gear. I was wearing sparring gloves. I hit him a little harder than I meant to but I still didn't hit him full power. His knees buckled and it took him several minutes to clear the cobwebs. Nasty punch.
 

xoek

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those, uh... squeezy, springy thingies you squeeze help strengthen your wrist. you know they have two hanles that fit in your palm and fingers and are attached by a heavy srping at the top. yeah, those.
 

nelsonkari

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Hey brother!

I know the feeling. Thank God that you weren't hit with bare knuckles on the noggin. You would then have knots on your head!

One point of interest is that a large TKD association has outlawed the spinning backfist in class practice or competition because of the possibility of injury.

The best counter that I know for this move is to step in to the technique while keeping both arms up to ward off blows to either side. You can then "clothesline" your opponent while dropping him on his rear end by stepping slightly to the side. A stomp kick works well as a "finisher".For you BJJ fans a rear naked choke would be a good choice as well AFTER you do the block of course.

Best of luck in Kenpo!

Nelson
 
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