Sipalki Jumeog Bi kwan

Buka

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Is that you in the video?
 
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Aurinegro04

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Thank you very much for your opinions.The use of knife isn't very common in my country.
 

Tony Dismukes

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I'm not familiar with this art. Can you tell us a bit about it: where it comes from, what training is like, that sort of thing?
 
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Aurinegro04

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Sipalki comes from Korea.
Sipalki means eighteen techniques, three with empty hands and the other with weapons.My Master Ra繳l Luzco after 30 years practising Sipalki founded his own school, its name Jumeog Bi Kwan(fist's secret school).
For more information : SIPALKI JUMEOG BI KWAN
 

Chris Parker

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I'm not familiar with this art. Can you tell us a bit about it: where it comes from, what training is like, that sort of thing?

Not to disrupt Aurinegro04's ideals or beliefs too much, but what is shown in these videos is not what would be recognised as Sipalki by anyone outside of that school.

In essence, Sipalki (Sib Pal Ki, Sibpalki, or any of a few other romanizations) is a Korean term that refers to "18 skills" and is used to generically refer to martial arts, or to refer to Chinese martial arts in Korea (as opposed to the Japanese arts in Korea). It is undergoing a resurgence, largely due to the popularisation of the name through the work of Dr Kim Kwang-Seok, who established the association for the preservation and research of Sipalki in 1981, with the first public demonstrations by his students in 2001.

In short, Kim had trained in Chinese arts under a Korean teacher since the 50's, opening his own school in 1969. He later tried comparing what he learnt to a seminal book on Korean martial arts, called the Muyedobotonji, a tome written in 1790, offering a comprehensive description of martial methods in Korea (and where the term "Sipalki" comes from). The issue, sadly, is that it is not necessarily a list of Korean martial arts, but arts known in Korea at the time. In fact, it is noted that the Koreans didn't really have much in the way of martial arts other than some archery (no sword, no spear, little unarmed). As a result, it's more a compendium of Chinese arts, as they were the basis of all other martial arts in Korea at the time (it was said that Chinese arts supplied all military methods outside of archery, for example).

As can be inferred from this, pretty much all forms of Sipalki (Sibpalki, Sibpakgi, Sib Pak Ki etc) are essentially Chinese martial arts they don't have FMA-like knife methods as shown in the OP video, nor do they have double Western bullwhips (another thread), nunchaku (the linked blog), or, well, anything like anything shown in any of the videos from the OP's school. Instead, they look like this:


Again, though, the term is often used just to refer to Chinese martial arts. Kind of a Korean way of saying "Kung Fu".

Sipalki comes from Korea.
Sipalki means eighteen techniques, three with empty hands and the other with weapons.My Master Ra繳l Luzco after 30 years practising Sipalki founded his own school, its name Jumeog Bi Kwan(fist's secret school).
For more information : SIPALKI JUMEOG BI KWAN

While your information isn't technically incorrect (Sipalki is Korean, but refers dominantly to Chinese martial arts, it means 18 methods/skills, but the division isn't that defined), I would ask about where your teacher learnt his Korean art with Okinawan, Japanese, and Western weaponry, and no real trace of either Korean or Chinese arts found. Unfortunately, other than the videos, the blog didn't help me much, as I don't speak Portuguese

I'm not saying that it's not a good school, or that you don't learn good things there (honestly, I'm reserving my comments here), but that there are questions as to the history and origins.
 
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Aurinegro04

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Hi Chris, I know well the history of sibpalki.
In the 70s a Korean teacher came to Argentina saying that practicing the martial art called sibpalki and his style was that of his family.
Some say that this style has nothing to do with the historical sibpalki but a variant of hapkido as this teacher was co-first hapkido practitioners, only he knows.
Our school is separated for years and have our own trunk and weapons forms.
 

Chris Parker

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Hmm the thing is, there was no "historical sipalki". It was a term coined to describe Chinese martial arts from a Korean perspective. There was no single art called "Sipalki". There was no "family style" of Sipalki, so to claim that he was teaching one raises a number of red flags. There's also very little Hapkido (I did see some similar actions, but not a lot) in your system but that would be a Japanese art (in it's base), not Chinese so not Sipalki either.

Again, I'm not looking to disparage your class, your teacher, or your style all I'm saying is that what you're doing is not what would be recognised as Sipalki by the greater community, as it's missing basically everything seen there, and has a large repertoire of additional (non-Korean, non-Chinese, non-Sipalki) methods added in.
 

Tez3

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Unfortunately, other than the videos, the blog didn't help me much, as I don't speak Portuguese

Just curious nothing else, why is the blog in Portuguese when Argentina is a Spanish speaking country?
 

Chris Parker

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Eh, that's probably my mistake I made an assumption that, along with other South American countries, the language I was seeing was Portuguese. If it's Spanish, that doesn't remove my issue in reading it (as evidenced by my not recognising which exact language) but they're similar enough to make the mistake (I hope!).
 

Tez3

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Eh, that's probably my mistake I made an assumption that, along with other South American countries, the language I was seeing was Portuguese. If it's Spanish, that doesn't remove my issue in reading it (as evidenced by my not recognising which exact language) but they're similar enough to make the mistake (I hope!).

Had a look then asked Google it is Spanish. Google translates quite well much to my surprise. I know they speak Spanish in Argentina we have some Argentinian artifacts that was left behind somewhere that my husband brought home in the 80s. ;)
 
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Aurinegro04

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In Argentina we speak Spanish, in Brazil speak Portuguese ;)
 
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Aurinegro04

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Hmm the thing is, there was no "historical sipalki". It was a term coined to describe Chinese martial arts from a Korean perspective. There was no single art called "Sipalki". There was no "family style" of Sipalki, so to claim that he was teaching one raises a number of red flags. There's also very little Hapkido (I did see some similar actions, but not a lot) in your system but that would be a Japanese art (in it's base), not Chinese so not Sipalki either.

Again, I'm not looking to disparage your class, your teacher, or your style all I'm saying is that what you're doing is not what would be recognised as Sipalki by the greater community, as it's missing basically everything seen there, and has a large repertoire of additional (non-Korean, non-Chinese, non-Sipalki) methods added in.

You're right.Korean master only knows where he learned this.
 

destructautomaton

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Interesting. Its actually from korean origins brought to argentina. I thought it was an indigneous Argentina system. I was just watching some of the indigneous italian knife systems some of which were very interesting thought it might be along those lines but i guess not.
 

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