Shinkage Ry没

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Bagatha

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Shinkage Ry没..... What do you guys know about this art?

Thank you. :asian:
 
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Mike Clarke

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The American shotokan karate intructor Robin L. Rielly is a Yudansha in this style also, and I beleieve published a book on it some years ago [sorry I don't have isbn to hand].

On the inside dust cover of his book on shotokan [isbn 0-8048 1488-0 published by Tuttle], it says; he [Rielly] has a second degree black-belt in Shin Kage-ryu jujutsu from the Kobukan school in Yokohama,Japan.

I beleieve Mr.Rielly lives in the Toms River area of New Jersey [or did at the time the book was published, which was a while ago].

Hope this is of some help?

Mike.
 
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Jill666

Guest
Don't be sorry- I hadn't heard of either and now I have! Also the school in PA seems to have quite a nice site- if I were nearby I'd go for a look.:jedi1:
 
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Mike Clarke

Guest
Why do I do it, try to type faster than I can think!

:rolleyes:

Mike.
 
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chufeng

Guest
Sorry for this off-color reply, but, when I first saw this post, i thought it said SHRINKAGE RYU...and I immediately thought of cold-water neigong...

:eek:
chufeng
 

Saitama Steve

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There is a jujutsu ryuha called Shinkage ryu, but it is in no way related to Yagyu Shinkage ryu heiho in any way, shape or form. In fact both ryuha use different kanji for their name and have completely different hostorical lineages.

Also Yagyu Shinkage ryu as far as I know doesn't hand out dan grades, since it is a koryu. The same goes for Shinkage ryu jujutsu.
 

kenmpoka

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Originally posted by Saitama Steve
There is a jujutsu ryuha called Shinkage ryu, but it is in no way related to Yagyu Shinkage ryu heiho in any way, shape or form. In fact both ryuha use different kanji for their name and have completely different hostorical lineages.

Also Yagyu Shinkage ryu as far as I know doesn't hand out dan grades, since it is a koryu. The same goes for Shinkage ryu jujutsu.
You are correct, Mr. Clarke is referring to a system originating from Shin Kage Ryu Jujutsu, founded by Master Fumio Nagaoka, later renamed Shin Kage Ryu Karate Jujutsu. This system is primarily a combination of Shin Kage Ryu jujutsu with Okinawan Karate influence. The head quarter is in Yokohoma/Japan. Mr. Rielly is the only proponent in the U.S.
The Chinese Kanji read "spirit shadow way" as well.

Respectfully,
 

Mannyjv

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Yagyu Shinkage Ryu is the weapons aspect and Yagyu Shingan Ryu is more of the unarmed aspect. Yagyu Shinkage Ryu Heiho, from what I understand, is both of them together.
 

Chris Parker

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Hi,

I'm going to disagree with the last post here. Yagyu Shinkage Ryu Heiho is primarily a school of swordsmanship famous for supplying the Tokugawa Shoguns with teachers (Yagyu Munenori being probably the most famous). It was founded by Yagyu Munetoshi (Munenori's father, if memory serves), from the original source school of Shin Kage Ryu founded by Kamiizumi Ise-no Kami Nobutsuna in the mid-to-late 1500's (the official date of Yagyu Shinkage Ryu's founding is 1658 in most sources). Kamiizumi had based the Shinkage Ryu on the teachings of Kage Ryu, and had also trained in some other very famous systems, such as Kashima Ryu and Katori Shinto Ryu. He named his system Shin Kage Ryu (New Kage Ryu).

Yagyu trained in this Shin Kage Ryu and attained Menkyo Kaiden (full Mastership). He later (along with his son Munenori) introduced his art to Tokugawa Ieyasu, future ruler of Japan. Tokugawa was highly impressed, and employed the Yagyu family to be the official Swordsmanship Instructor for the Shogunate. He then founded his own system, which he called Yagyu Shinkage Ryu. Munetoshi's son Munenori has a number of famous stories about his skill, and his teaching methods, including meetings of mutual respect with the great Musashi Miyamoto. It is said that Yagyu Munenori helped Musashi in his research of two sword techniques, and the two of them also developed techniques to defeat two swords when only armed with one, known as Nito Yaburi. This is still taugth in one branch of the Yagyu Shinkage Ryu today.

In another branch, there exists a system of Iai (sword drawing), which is taught alongside the regular curriculum, known as Yagyu Seigo Ryu battojutsu, as well as another branch teaching Jo (4 foot staff) techniques by the name of Jubei no Jo, named after Yagyu Jubei, a popular character in Japanese books and film.

Yagyu Shingan Ryu, on the other hand, is a completely seperate Martial System. It was founded in the early 1600's by Araki Mataemon, according to the Goto-ha branch, also known as the Edo line, which refers to itself as Yagyu Shingan Ryu Taijutsu, although they also teach Kenjutsu, Bojutsu, Naginatajutsu, and Iaijutsu. It is said that Araki trained under Yagyu Munenori, and was such a gifted student that he was granted permission to use the name Yagyu in naming his own school by Yagyu Jubei.

The other popular line of Yagyu Shingan Ryu is refered to as Yagyu Shingan Ryu Heiho, and is based far more in armoured tactics. There are a number of unarmed sections, as well as weapon systems teaching Kenjutsu, Naginatajutsu, Bojutsu, Kamajutsu, Sojutsu, and others. This branch traces their origin back to Takenaga Hayato, who studied a number of systems, such as Toda Ryu (which exists in part today as Toda-ha Buko Ryu Naginatajutsu and Kiraku Ryu Jujutsu), Shindo Ryu, and Shingan Ryu. Shingan Ryu in particular was quite a hard system based in Sengoku period battlefield fighting, and was quite an influence on Hayato. Naming his own system Shingan Ryu (different characters), he travelled to Edo and met Yagyu Munenori, and was employed by the Sword Master. Again, the story tells that Hayato impressed Yagyu so much that he was given permission to use the name Yagyu in his own art, this time by Munenori.

The technical characteristics of each of these various arts and their branches are probably best discussed by those who train in the systems themselves, so I won't go into detail here, but I hope this has been some help.
 

pgsmith

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Excellent historical summation Chris, well done!

Of course, since the original post was made almost six years ago, I doubt that the poster is still curious about it. It's always a good idea to attempt to dispel misinformation though, and since MannyJV posted his error yesterday, it was a good response on your part.

Cheers,
 
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