self-Defense and the Law

marlon

Master Black Belt
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my instructor taught me to teach that the best kempo was to not be there. name calling , even robbery are not enough to really engage an assailant to the level of maiming or worse. When defending your life or the life of another against multiple attackers or armed assailants is when "all out kempo" is appropriate. i do my best to teach the students who come to me that in most cases there is no need for all of your kempo...we discuss scenarios and such as a part of class but not as a separate subject (perhaps i should) and i emphasize that walk away is the best rule...run away is the second best..fighting is the worst use of ones kempo..but should it come to that...win. That being said and reading this execellent post by Doc i am even more sensitized to the issue, however most of the kempo techniques i have are riddled with control points. That is to say points where one can stop, or continue and points where one can assume anotomical control of an assialant to the extent that it is viable to dis engage or control a single attacker while waiting for the authorities or reason to prevail. It is one of the things i love the most about kempo.

respectfully,
Marlon
 

Kacey

Sr. Grandmaster
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my instructor taught me to teach that the best kempo was to not be there. name calling , even robbery are not enough to really engage an assailant to the level of maiming or worse. When defending your life or the life of another against multiple attackers or armed assailants is when "all out kempo" is appropriate. i do my best to teach the students who come to me that in most cases there is no need for all of your kempo...we discuss scenarios and such as a part of class but not as a separate subject (perhaps i should) and i emphasize that walk away is the best rule...run away is the second best..fighting is the worst use of ones kempo..but should it come to that...win. That being said and reading this execellent post by Doc i am even more sensitized to the issue, however most of the kempo techniques i have are riddled with control points. That is to say points where one can stop, or continue and points where one can assume anotomical control of an assialant to the extent that it is viable to dis engage or control a single attacker while waiting for the authorities or reason to prevail. It is one of the things i love the most about kempo.

respectfully,
Marlon


I agree with Marlon, and Marlon's instructor (bolded sentence) - and, in fact, my instructor teaches the same thing, and so I do. From a self-defense perspective, not being in a situation where you need to defend yourself is the best defense.

From a legal perspective, being able to prove that you felt you (or those with you, or victims who were unable to defend themselves) were in immediate danger, and that you did the minimum necessary to prevent/remove that danger is the best method. Once the attacker(s) are fled, disarmed, downed, or otherwise rendered incapable of continued attack - STOP. But once you're able to leave the situation, get out - continued attack (even defensive attacks) on your part could easily leave you open to countersuits of excessive force by your attacker. Leave the situation as quickly and in as orderly a fashion as is expedient. Call the police when you are safely away - stopping to call before you are safely away could easily put you in further danger. Be able to explain what you did - and more importantly, why you felt you needed to do it, why you went to whatever extent your need for self-defense caused you to go to. But don't stay to beat on your opponent once you can leave... no matter how much your baser instincts may be telling you to do so.
 
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