New to MT & ISO hip arthritis info

Tazco

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Thoroughly enjoying Tang Soo do and Tae Kwon Do, I had to stop about 3-4 years ago due to severe hip pain that turned out to be full blown osteoarthritis in both hips. I've been reading a number of threads on this site and have noticed several approaches takento this problem, such as:

Taking it easy on the joint
THR
Changing Martial Art styles

I've pretty much settled on taking easy on the joint for the time being. I haven't practiced MA for 3-4 years now. I stay in shape, but do miss practicing like I used to. I was very into it, even studying to be an instructor.

As far as a replacement, I am reluctant due to my age, but might. Since I let up on the hard-core high kicks and pounding that goes with typical workout routines, my hips are doing much better. I am probably going to post another thread to get more info from the members here. A lot of you have had similar experiences that I would like to learn from. There are also other approaches to THR, such as resurfacing and refracturing. Refracturing is very new and may only still be available for knees. It seems most new therapies for joints start with knees and eventually make it to the hips.

The other thing I could do, since I'm a big guy, is get into another martial art altogether....something that is not as hard on the hips. I'm pretty competitive and enjoy a hard workout. I probably wouldn't be into Tai Chi, for example.

If you've read this far, thanks for listening. I have read a number of threads here and like the feel and wealth of shared info. Looking for to visiting often.
 

newGuy12

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I'm pretty competitive and enjoy a hard workout. I probably wouldn't be into Tai Chi, for example.

That's too bad, because Tai Chi may be able to help this problem! You may find that there are therapeutic benefits to that practice! Now, at one time I was a member of some type of Tai Chi that later I found out from this board was bogus. It would not teach you to fight. At all. BUT, I swear, there are good benefits to be had for these kinds of problems. Hopefully some Tai Chi person will reply to this thread.

I hope you all the best, that you can overcome this somehow and then practice a hard style again, like TKD. I would tend to agree with you about not wanting to have surgery. If you can avoid it, I would. Then again, I am not a doctor, and cannot give advise as a Doctor could.

Welcome to the board,






Robert
 

SFC JeffJ

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As someone who has been plagued with hip problems myself, I can easily sympathize with you. Hope you can find what you are looking for here.

Welcome to MT and enjoy.

Jeff
 

Drac

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Greetings and Welcome to MT...I have no advice to offer..
 

morph4me

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Hello and welcome to MT :). The only advice I can offer is listen to your body and do what you're able to do. I hope you find the answers you're looking for.
 

amillr

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I hope this helps some. I'm a Tang So Do, Tae Kwon Do (WTF), and Tai Chi practicioner.
"Rafael"

A little TaiChi everyday goes a long way!

Guidelines: After getting the go ahead from your doctor start with 10-20 minutes of taichi exercises that strengthen, stretch and work range of motion. Add 15-60 minutes of taichi movements (or other low impact aerobic exercise) 3 times a week.

Start out slowly and gradually increase intensity or repetitions over time, but never exercise to the point of pain. Adapt the techniques to fit your situation to achieve your goals of more mobility, less pain and a happier life!

1. Flexibility training helps improve range of motion and reduces stiffness in affected joints, particularly the early morning stiffness often associated with arthritis.
2. Cardiovascular exercise, especially a low impact exercise like taichi or even walking, not only improves overall fitness, but also helps reduce the psychological and emotional pain that often accompanies arthritis.
3. TaiChi strengthens muscles and improves mobility, which makes it easier to perform activities of daily living. The easier these activities are, the more active one is likely to be overall.
4. Weight bearing exercise such as taichi, positively affects bone mass, helping to reduce the risk of developing osteoporosis, a degenerative bone disease that is often seen in people with arthritis due to reduced activity.
5. Arthritis can negatively affect posture, balance and coordination, all of which may be improved with a regular taichi exercise program.
6. Excess weight places additional strain on the joints, so maintaining a healthy weight is important for those with arthritis. Along with a sensible diet, taichi can aid in weight management.
7. TaiChi has been proven to help manage stress, which can take it's toll on the whole body, including the joints.
8. Because it is a chronic, degenerative disease, arthritis can often cause people to become depressed and develop a poor self image. People who exercise, however, tend to feel better about themselves, have less depression and possess a more positive outlook.
9. Painful joints can make getting a good night's sleep difficult, if not impossible. A regular taichi exercise program has been shown to improve sleep patterns and may help alleviate this problem.
10. Because arthritis often leads to a more sedentary lifestyle, individuals with this disease often increase their risk of developing other deadly diseases, such as heart disease or diabetes. Staying active and exercising regularly helps offset the effects of arthritis and lessens the risk of developing some other lifestyle-related diseases.
 
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Tazco

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Rafael, and everyone else who replied,

Thanks. Greatly appreciated.

I have looked into TaiChi. My wife used to do it. I could certainly give it a try.

I do exercise regularly, try to stay limber. I lift weights (more reps, less weight) and bike ride. Seem to work and what some doctors would order. I have put on a couple of pounds and am getting them off. I watch what I eat, etc.

I am extremely careful about overstretching. I used to do yoga and may do it again as well...but very judiciously. Bad stretching injuries tended to be some of the worst ones to recover from.

Thanks again.

Jerry
 

kaizasosei

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please correct me if im wrong but, i'm guessing you're hips are not that flexible to begin with. i have seen very different people and have many different people around me so it is interesting for me to compare. also, my hip flexibility is not that great originally, i mean since i was very young, my hips were not that flexible. only through training was i able to achieve splits, kekkafuza and seiza for long time- but from the start and also now in my laziness, my hips and shoulders are not that flexible.
that was one of my greatest reasons as well as challenges in training. not for the flexibility itlself or health or anything. but i simply wanted to achieve that aesthetic feeling with highk kicks and smooth leg techniques-

now however stretching is more of a focus than any destructive striking techniques. i pay much more attention to what i am doing to my body.
i have noticed that in certain cases, some people that have arthritic hip have been maintaining unflexible hips for many decades. i'm conviced that by stretching it is possible to become completely healthy. in my case, i am currently rehabilitating a few joints. this invoves grinding of the joints until the bone is worn down. it can get a little sore sometimes. i too am tempted to just ask somebody to cut it open and saw off a cm or two of bone for me. but i don't know if that might be too quick or if the balance will be affected or the operation not go smoothly....
stretching joints can seem like an endless and impossible mission. but that is the beauty of it because, if you keep going, slowly but surely you can achieve the goals. i think the bodys posture and movement is very important, but flexibility also begins in the mind. one must strive to attain correct natural body. with flexible hips and knees and toes. neck ,shoulders arms and back. that is true chigung. those that practive physical movements to heal or stregthen their bodies are practicing real chigong, in my opinion.

i don't know if this type of situation also applies, but if it does i'd get cracking if i were you.
generally though everyone knows what is best but they just don't do it. or in my case being to lazy. - well,, it seems that constant awareness and mental strain make up a bit for my lack of a complete or more intense workout routine.
 

setboy

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Look into what distilled water and fasting can do for your hips.


Raphael
 

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