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Buka

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Used to do something similar at one point in time. Eventually changed it up a little.

The person throwing the punch isnt actually trying to strike his training partner, hes presenting himself in a fixed position, open to a counter that isnt necessary. Why it isnt necessary is because the puncher isnt trying to hit the defender, the punch is merely an extended arm, frozen for a moment in time.

While it can be helpful, somewhat, for new white belts, it can be extremely detrimental for others. It tends to give a student a false sense of distance, and a false sense of timing. That can really suck if someone actually tries to punch you in a non controlled environment.

What might be a good idea is to gear up with some gloves, mouthpiece and head gear. NOT TO BANG AWAY, but to train safe. Go through the drill the exact same way, but close enough that you just might get hit. Teach good control and implements it into the exercise. Then the puncher can say to his partner, Okay, this what Im going to throw and try to hit you on the chin, the forehead, wherever.. And when I say hit, I do not mean hit hard.

And then, before you start, have the puncher give him a little shot. A well controlled little shot that shows the defender exactly where the punch is going to hit. THEN go through the exercise.

Another way - again, have the puncher in the right distance, give each other that little shot, THEN have the defender never defend it the same way twice. Duck it one time, slip it another, step off and in to both sides, step in and jam, stop back and evade. Let the defender move on his own freely, getting an idea what might actually work for him.

Its important that the two practitioners communicate with each other. How was that one? Want me to throw it faster, slower, wider, lower etc?

You need your own trial and error, under the trainers guidance of course. And that kind of exercise helps more when its done for an hour or so.

And from both fixed stances and moving stances. Sometimes have the puncher start from ten feet away, casually walking towards him, sometimes looking right at him and sometimes not looking at him at all. That in itself gives the defender a better way to understand distance, especially a distance that is closing.

And again, you have to have the practitioners communicating with each other. And to those that say "we don't talk during class."

Yeah, we don't either. Unless we're communicating. :)
 
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Monkey Turned Wolf

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Are you referring to the actual clip or your idea? The clip was one step sparring.
Do you mean the clip i posted? That was of combination 14 in SKK. They've got about 100 similar techniques (that's one of the least complicated), that was just included to explain the type of thing that's impractical in an actual fight, and one step/two step sparring would be one of the 'whatever you want to call it' terms. A lot of arts have their own terms for those things.

But I was asking if someone's done anything similar to my idea, and how it turned out.
 

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Do you mean the clip i posted? That was of combination 14 in SKK. They've got about 100 similar techniques (that's one of the least complicated), that was just included to explain the type of thing that's impractical in an actual fight, and one step/two step sparring would be one of the 'whatever you want to call it' terms. A lot of arts have their own terms for those things.

But I was asking if someone's done anything similar to my idea, and how it turned out.

Ok. Sounds like a very good idea. I would say its a novel approach to teaching within TMA. Martial arts instructors have a tendency to be all inclusive when it comes to techniques. They might recommend some things over others but never go into great depths why.
 
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It can also be worth it to nuance forms forms from applications, especially in a tight pressure situation.

Have the students experiment under clock pressure and see which techniques get diluded and which remain true to form. There are for an example TKD instructors who advocate donkey style side kicks in self defense rather than the flexible ones, due to time pressure and clothing. I don't know exactly how I would set it up but it would be with a forced move context.

Assuming kicks to the mid section are covered in your class that is..
 
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It can also be worth it to nuance forms forms from applications, especially in a tight pressure situation.

Have the students experiment under clock pressure and see which techniques get diluded and which remain true to form. There are for an example TKD instructors who advocate donkey style side kicks in self defense rather than the flexible ones, due to time pressure and clothing. I don't know exactly how I would set it up but it would be with a forced move context.

Assuming kicks to the mid section are covered in your class that is..
If I ever got around to teaching my own dojo and forms were involved, I would probably include something like that. It would get rid of a lot of the bunkai debate. I'm not sure if I would include forms at all though. I'd definitely do techniques like this, which is part of the reason I'm doing this, but the juries still out on forms.

More than likely if I included forms it would be the tai chi forms and dynamic tension forms that I know, and that would be more of as a way to teach breathing and body-control (if I were focused on more than just fighting).
 
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Used to do something similar at one point in time. Eventually changed it up a little.

The person throwing the punch isnt actually trying to strike his training partner, hes presenting himself in a fixed position, open to a counter that isnt necessary. Why it isnt necessary is because the puncher isnt trying to hit the defender, the punch is merely an extended arm, frozen for a moment in time.

While it can be helpful, somewhat, for new white belts, it can be extremely detrimental for others. It tends to give a student a false sense of distance, and a false sense of timing. That can really suck if someone actually tries to punch you in a non controlled environment.

What might be a good idea is to gear up with some gloves, mouthpiece and head gear. NOT TO BANG AWAY, but to train safe. Go through the drill the exact same way, but close enough that you just might get hit. Teach good control and implements it into the exercise. Then the puncher can say to his partner, Okay, this what Im going to throw and try to hit you on the chin, the forehead, wherever.. And when I say hit, I do not mean hit hard.

And then, before you start, have the puncher give him a little shot. A well controlled little shot that shows the defender exactly where the punch is going to hit. THEN go through the exercise.

Another way - again, have the puncher in the right distance, give each other that little shot, THEN have the defender never defend it the same way twice. Duck it one time, slip it another, step off and in to both sides, step in and jam, stop back and evade. Let the defender move on his own freely, getting an idea what might actually work for him.

Its important that the two practitioners communicate with each other. How was that one? Want me to throw it faster, slower, wider, lower etc?

You need your own trial and error, under the trainers guidance of course. And that kind of exercise helps more when its done for an hour or so.

And from both fixed stances and moving stances. Sometimes have the puncher start from ten feet away, casually walking towards him, sometimes looking right at him and sometimes not looking at him at all. That in itself gives the defender a better way to understand distance, especially a distance that is closing.

And again, you have to have the practitioners communicating with each other. And to those that say "we don't talk during class."

Yeah, we don't either. Unless we're communicating. :)
I think out of my 18 or so years of SKK, I only did this for the last 3-4. And not quite this-we'd basically do either slow sparring, with the instructor telling us to include a combination/kempo, or we'd have one guy just continuously attacking while ignoring defense and the other has to do the combo/kempo. In the second one, once it's a success you move to the next one, if it's a failure you reset and try again. But we did way less of that than we should have for our levels.
 

Buka

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I think out of my 18 or so years of SKK, I only did this for the last 3-4. And not quite this-we'd basically do either slow sparring, with the instructor telling us to include a combination/kempo, or we'd have one guy just continuously attacking while ignoring defense and the other has to do the combo/kempo. In the second one, once it's a success you move to the next one, if it's a failure you reset and try again. But we did way less of that than we should have for our levels.

Martial Arts training is always a work in progress. Probably why its so enjoyable.

Such a grand thing, that.
 

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Used to do something similar at one point in time. Eventually changed it up a little.

The person throwing the punch isnt actually trying to strike his training partner, hes presenting himself in a fixed position, open to a counter that isnt necessary. Why it isnt necessary is because the puncher isnt trying to hit the defender, the punch is merely an extended arm, frozen for a moment in time.

While it can be helpful, somewhat, for new white belts, it can be extremely detrimental for others. It tends to give a student a false sense of distance, and a false sense of timing. That can really suck if someone actually tries to punch you in a non controlled environment.

What might be a good idea is to gear up with some gloves, mouthpiece and head gear. NOT TO BANG AWAY, but to train safe. Go through the drill the exact same way, but close enough that you just might get hit. Teach good control and implements it into the exercise. Then the puncher can say to his partner, Okay, this what Im going to throw and try to hit you on the chin, the forehead, wherever.. And when I say hit, I do not mean hit hard.

And then, before you start, have the puncher give him a little shot. A well controlled little shot that shows the defender exactly where the punch is going to hit. THEN go through the exercise.

Another way - again, have the puncher in the right distance, give each other that little shot, THEN have the defender never defend it the same way twice. Duck it one time, slip it another, step off and in to both sides, step in and jam, stop back and evade. Let the defender move on his own freely, getting an idea what might actually work for him.

Its important that the two practitioners communicate with each other. How was that one? Want me to throw it faster, slower, wider, lower etc?

You need your own trial and error, under the trainers guidance of course. And that kind of exercise helps more when its done for an hour or so.

And from both fixed stances and moving stances. Sometimes have the puncher start from ten feet away, casually walking towards him, sometimes looking right at him and sometimes not looking at him at all. That in itself gives the defender a better way to understand distance, especially a distance that is closing.

And again, you have to have the practitioners communicating with each other. And to those that say "we don't talk during class."

Yeah, we don't either. Unless we're communicating. :)
Agree.
We do classic one/two/three steps but we sometimes vary the intro; walking, running, low, high, side, etc... The one big thing we may do differently is ramp the speed up. We will start at a slow speed, somewhat based on the skill/experience of the room then ramp up conventional one steps up until we start changing the entry. Usually last for the whole class.
 
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