My training - Sharing some of my footwork and Kung Fu Drills

JowGaWolf

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1st Exercise: Side Hops 0:00 - 1:48
The purpose of this exercise is to stay either on the toes or stay flat footed. Doing it flat footed is like riding with the breaks on. Staying on the toes increases mobility. This drill helps me to train my lateral mobility.
Do:
  • This is about the pace you want to go. If it's too easy then lower your stance
  • Try to relax when doing this. Relax your breathing. Here you can see that my right is tense.I'm not sure if my hip was bothering me that night or not, but try to stay relaxed
  • If you go forward and backwards then try to sense your environment. It's a good opportunity to train spacial awareness.
Don't:
  • You don't want your feet to clap together or come too close.
  • You don't want to tense up. It will happen when you become tired. You can see that one is tighter than the other. I'm not sure if my hip was bothering me that night or not, but try to stay relaxed

2nd Exercise: 45簞 cuts to the outside. Face Opponent. 1:49 - 3:05
This is the walk through for beginners that I do with my son. This is Jow Ga Kung Fu foot work. I didn't take this from boxing. Later in the video you will see me do the form part of this. I have shown this in the past before. Walking through it helps train the mind to get the body to move the way that you want it to move.

3rd Exercise : Jab + 45簞 cut to the outside. Face Opponent. 3:06 - 3:31
Shuffle step into a jab cut an angle and face opponent. Again walk through it first without the punch.

4th exercise: Jab + 45簞 cut to the outside. Hook Opponent 3:32 - 4-16
You are now looking at Jow ga Kung Fu. I always start with a walk through before I get into the the technique.
 
Starting at 1.50, what you are doing is what I call the "wheeling step". The best footwork to move yourself to be out of your opponent's attacking path.

wheeling_step.jpg
 

First Exercise: Side Hops 0:00 - 1:48
The purpose of this exercise is to stay either on the toes or stay flat footed. Doing it flat footed is like riding with the breaks on. Staying on the toes increases mobility. This drill helps me to train my lateral mobility.
Do:
  • This is about the pace you want to go. If it's too easy then lower your stance
  • Try to relax when doing this. Relax your breathing. Here you can see that my right is tense.I'm not sure if my hip was bothering me that night or not, but try to stay relaxed
  • If you go forward and backwards then try to sense your environment. It's a good opportunity to train spacial awareness.
Don't:
  • You don't want your feet to clap together or come too close.
  • You don't want to tense up. It will happen when you become tired. You can see that one is tighter than the other. I'm not sure if my hip was bothering me that night or not, but try to stay relaxed



Second Exercise: 45簞 cuts to the outside. Face Opponent. 1:49 - 3:05
This is the walk through for beginners that I do with my son. This is Jow Ga Kung Fu foot work. I didn't take this from boxing. Later in the video you will see me do the form part of this. I have shown this in the past before. Walking through it helps train the mind to get the body to move the way that you want it to move.

Third Exercise : Jab + 45簞 cut to the outside. Face Opponent. 3:06 - 3:31
Shuffle step into a jab cut an angle and face opponent. Again walk through it first without the punch.

4th exercise: Jab + 45簞 cut to the outside. Hook Opponent 3:32 - 4-16
You are now looking at Jow ga Kung Fu. I always start with a walk through before I get into the the technique.
5th Exercise what the technique looks like in the Jow Ga form 4:16 - 4:47
In the form you won't move off center. I just train it that way for so long now that I add it to my form even if it's a little movement off center.

6th Exercise Application variation #1 4:48 - 5-13
There are a lot of variations of this application.

7th Exercise Application variation #1 The dumbbell partner 5:14 - 6:21
I put dumbbell on the ground to help you better visualize what's going on. The dumbbell represents my opponent. Here you should see how the techniques gets me off the center line will remaining in striking distance to my opponent. I tried to walk through it but it's difficult to walk a shuffle. It's a timing and coordination issue where everything moves and stops almost at the same time.

 
8th Exercise Application variation #1 The dumbbell partner 6:22 - 7:12
I add a little more energy to it so that it's closer to sparring. Fighting quality is brutal. I'll have to do it once my hands heal. I'm giving them a week rest. No injuries. I just need them to heal in case there is something I'm not aware of. Here you can see me goof on the technique. It happens you can see me look a little frustrated because my focus wasn't there.

9th Exercise Low leg kick conditioning 7:12 - 8:15
This is a multiple drill that does the following. But I'm currently only using it for the Conditioning.
  • Conditions the instep, shin, and ankle. Here I'm only using the instep.
  • Trains to kick from the hands up position
  • Trains Palm strike + Kick
  • Trains punch + kick
  • Trains eye poke + kick
  • Trains tiger claw + kick
  • Trains Grappling hands + kick
The hand occupy my opponents attention and obstructs vision. It also helps to prevent me from eating punches.

10th Jab + Back fist + Overhead strike 8:16 - to end
This is where my son has trouble with this. The hands may look stupid but this type of training serves a purpose. There's a lot going on with this so I'll only discuss it if anyone is interested, I'm tired of typing for now.lol
 
Remix your videos with this.

lol I had no control over the music. Tonight someone had it left on heavy metal. Me and one of the boxing guys didn't care for it too much. It's too tense when we are trying to relax muscles. lol.
 
Starting at 1.50, what you are doing is what I call the "wheeling step". The best footwork to move yourself to be out of your opponent's attacking path.

View attachment 28115
Unfortunately this isn't taught in the Jow Ga schools that I know. I taught when I was an instructor at my last school.
 
Unfortunately this isn't taught in the Jow Ga schools that I know. I taught when I was an instructor at my last school.
The wheeling step is such an important footwork. I don't know why it doesn't exist in all MA systems.

Your opponent punches you. You left foot step 45 degree forward, your right foot then spin back to bring your body away from your opponent's attacking path.
 
The wheeling step is such an important footwork. I don't know why it doesn't exist in all MA systems.
To be honest it may be something that is forgotten being that there are very few who actually try to use kung fu.
 

1st Exercise: Side Hops 0:00 - 1:48
The purpose of this exercise is to stay either on the toes or stay flat footed. Doing it flat footed is like riding with the breaks on. Staying on the toes increases mobility. This drill helps me to train my lateral mobility.
Do:
  • This is about the pace you want to go. If it's too easy then lower your stance
  • Try to relax when doing this. Relax your breathing. Here you can see that my right is tense.I'm not sure if my hip was bothering me that night or not, but try to stay relaxed
  • If you go forward and backwards then try to sense your environment. It's a good opportunity to train spacial awareness.
Don't:
  • You don't want your feet to clap together or come too close.
  • You don't want to tense up. It will happen when you become tired. You can see that one is tighter than the other. I'm not sure if my hip was bothering me that night or not, but try to stay relaxed

2nd Exercise: 45簞 cuts to the outside. Face Opponent. 1:49 - 3:05
This is the walk through for beginners that I do with my son. This is Jow Ga Kung Fu foot work. I didn't take this from boxing. Later in the video you will see me do the form part of this. I have shown this in the past before. Walking through it helps train the mind to get the body to move the way that you want it to move.

3rd Exercise : Jab + 45簞 cut to the outside. Face Opponent. 3:06 - 3:31
Shuffle step into a jab cut an angle and face opponent. Again walk through it first without the punch.

4th exercise: Jab + 45簞 cut to the outside. Hook Opponent 3:32 - 4-16
You are now looking at Jow ga Kung Fu. I always start with a walk through before I get into the the technique.
These drills look very useful. Could you explain what the circular motion you are doing with your lead hand in the 4th exercise is for? Imagining it seems like you are slapping an opponents strike down wards but I could be wrong.
 
These drills look very useful. Could you explain what the circular motion you are doing with your lead hand in the 4th exercise is for? Imagining it seems like you are slapping an opponents strike down wards but I could be wrong.
By using wheeling step to move yourself out of your opponent's attacking path, you then hook punch (or hay-maker) behind your opponent's head (with the sharp edge of your fore arm) is a very good knock down move. I have used this move to knock down 6 guys in my life during challenge fights. One time I knocked a guy from vertical to horizontal before his body dropped down to the ground. It's one of my door guarding moves (bread and butter moves). When my opponent uses jab/cross at my face, I like to use hook to counter it.
 
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Could you explain what the circular motion you are doing with your lead hand in the 4th exercise is for?
It's a pull, but in reality it's 2 things in one. It starts with a motion for pulling then moves into a motion for scooping and then end with a motion for grabbing and striking. The technique itself actually has 3 names.
These drills look very useful. Could you explain what the circular motion you are doing with your lead hand in the 4th exercise is for? Imagining it seems like you are slapping an opponents strike down wards but I could be wrong.
It depends on what's in front of you. It can be used as a downward parry, But in reality it's not a parry as much as a redirect. I don't want to slap an incoming jab. I want to place it somewhere other than on my face. in order to do this, I have to keep my hand on the punching arm longer than I would if I use a parry. The other use is a pull guard. It's probably easier to demo it so you can see the placement
 
@Ivan
The technique at 1:35 in the video below is the technique that you are seeing. You can see how it's not a slapping hand like a parry

After comparing my video with Sifu Johnson'svideo. I can tell that I need to go back to basics for that technique. I guess that will be my next drill.
 
Your opponent punches you. You left foot step 45 degree forward, your right foot then spin back to bring your body away from your opponent's attacking path.
This is the training drill that I do with my son.
 
The wheeling step is such an important footwork. I don't know why it doesn't exist in all MA systems.

Your opponent punches you. You left foot step 45 degree forward, your right foot then spin back to bring your body away from your opponent's attacking path.
This concept exists in Kyokushin circles as Tai Sabaki.
 
By using wheeling step to move yourself out of your opponent's attacking path, you then hook punch (or hay-maker) behind your opponent's head (with the sharp edge of your fore arm) is a very good knock down move. I have used this move to knock down 6 guys in my life during challenge fights. One time I knocked a guy from vertical to horizontal before his body dropped down to the ground. It's one of my door guarding moves (bread and butter moves). When my opponent uses jab/cross at my face, I like to use hook to counter it.
Haven't watched the video of drills yet, so it might have been done in here, but one of my favorite drills is what I think you're calling a wheel step.

Basically you determine specific spots on the floor, have person do a step-in cross (or jab, but stay consistent), as you step in at a 45 degree angle, avoiding the straight punch, and turning towards them, ending at their back. Then the other person whirls around and punches again and you do the same. Half the time drill is done with a parry, half the time it isn't. Continue until you either get hit, or one of the two people gets too dizzy and steps back, indicating they need a break.

Once you start again, switch from cross to jab, so the stepper has to start stepping to the right angle instead of left. Then switch 'attackers' after next break.

Became one of my best moves, especially since you can throw a hook at any point during or after the step, or go for a grab after. The drill does a great job of teaching it, and also how not to be afraid of punches (flinching during it will cause you to get hit, and at some point you're getting hit anyway during it and you learn it's not that big a deal).
 
flinching during it will cause you to get hit, and at some point you're getting hit anyway during it and you learn it's not that big a deal
I teach students to ignore the flinch and to take advantage of the time that the opponent uses to flinch land the punch. Easier said then done, but bailing out of a technique can be worst than not doing it.
 
I teach students to ignore the flinch and to take advantage of the time that the opponent uses to flinch land the punch. Easier said then done, but bailing out of a technique can be worst than not doing it.
Flinching has to be essentially hammered out. Hoping it's not something that comes back since it's been about 2-3 years since I've done (h2h striking) sparring beyond messing around with friends.

I'd disagree though about bailing out of a technique. If you realize a counter's coming or they're taking advantage of something you missed, nothing wrong with jumping out and resetting. But that's part of why learning to transition to your favored zone is so important.
 
I'd disagree though about bailing out of a technique. If you realize a counter's coming or they're taking advantage of something you missed, nothing wrong with jumping out and resetting. But that's part of why learning to transition to your favored zone is so important.
I wouldn't call this bailing out. There's a difference between recognizing when an opportunity is there and when it's not. For me bailout is what happens when your opponent makes a jerky move and the person gets afraid so they bailout. It's done without reason. It didn't happen because the person saw something coming or because they missed the timing for the opportunity. Recalculating is fine. Bailing out isn't. Flinch movements cause a lot of bailing out which is the purpose of using it against the opponent. You cause your opponent to bailout of their technique and then you take advantage of them bailing out.
 
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I wouldn't call this bailing out. There's a difference between recognizing when an opportunity is there and when it's not. For me bailout is what happens when your opponent makes a jerky move and the person gets afraid so they bailout. It's done without reason. It didn't happen because the person so something coming or because they missed the timing for the opportunity. Recalculating is fine. Bailing out isn't. Flinch movements cause a lot of bailing out which is the purpose of using it against the opponent. You cause your opponent to bailout of their technique and then you take advantage of them bailing out.
Gotcha. Then I agree with you.
 

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