Most Popular Style of Kung Fu?

thekuntawman

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ngo cho kun is pretty much a philippine style of kung fu. there is a lot of kung fu in the philippines, and from what i can see this style is only practice in the philippines. it was always nown as "kung fu" when i was a kid, i thought was strange because it looks what we call kuntaw. anyway almost all of them also are arnisador.

and philippine kuntaw is not what we've seen in videos becuase these are kung fu back ground people (or kenpo/jkd/silat) who decide to come out with the new exotic thing, so they make up words like "kuntaw-silat" or whatever. but even in philippine silat, i dont see langka or those fancy movements that are so popular in videos. trust me you name them, i will show to you how they are tai chi, sing yi ba kua, silat (seminar), or kenpo people pretending this is "philippine kuntaw", but theres not even any lineage they can tell you about. and dutch dont count ;-)

anyway, did you guys know that i studied hong tao choy mei for 7 years? i do know a little about kung fu. just a little bit. :)
 

Black Grass

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Ngo cho kun tao, is practiced in other places in SE Asia (like) Malaysia, but I think its more popular in the Phil. then those other countries.

In the Philippine silat there is lanka, but I believe this is a recent development driven by bunga competation or silat seni. Silat practiced in the west is very different then it is practiced in the MaPhilIndo just like CMA, and FMA.

But that discussion is for another forum.
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arnisador

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Interesting! Is Ngo cho kun tao in the Philippines practiced with forms just as in China?

What otehr Chinese styles are practiced there? Is there a Phoenix-eye fist (like Southern praying mantis) in the Philippines?
 

thekuntawman

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well there is a well known hung ga teacher in makati manila. if you know about francisco rivera who is a great hung ga teacher, his sifu is the one in manila. there is also a third generation sifu of hung fut style in manila. his son is the owner of a popular restaurant. i did see some others but i dont remember the name. oh, there is beng kiam athletic gym, but i dont know what style that is.

in the philippines you can also find great shotokan and shorin ryu and kyukushinkai. the gonzales family of shorin ryu is like the gracie, becuase they did a lot of fighting. i also met the only aikido fighter i fought in the philippines and he was pretty dam good!"

the ngo cho kun teacher is a chinaman, but all the students i saw are filipino, and they do there kung fu just like philippine styles. you know, all of them do the different arts very different to where you can tell "that guy is pilipino".
 
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arnisador

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Originally posted by thekuntawman
you know, all of them do the different arts very different to where you can tell "that guy is pilipino".

Very interesting! I wish I could see it. I'm sure it's different.
 

Black Grass

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FYI,

beng kiam athletic gym practice Ngo cho, it is where Alex Co ( author os the ngo cho book) and Christopher Ricketts ( Bakbakan Int.) got their ngo cho.

Regards,
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arnisador

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Originally posted by Sanxiawuyi
North-Western styles:

The current issue of Black Belt magazine (April 2002) has a short column by Mark Cheng discussing the martial arts of China's ethnic minorities with an emphasis on Chinese Moslems.
 
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Sanxiawuyi

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Originally posted by arnisador


The current issue of Black Belt magazine (April 2002) has a short column by Mark Cheng discussing the martial arts of China's ethnic minorities with an emphasis on Chinese Moslems.

I havent seen that issue or list, but Moslems are wide spread in China. During many years they exchanged martial arts with the Han race. It is hard to say which styles of wushu are moslem styles. Below are styles popular among all the huizu ("moslems").

Tantui (spring legs)
Chaquan (fist of Cha-mir)
Liuhequan (fist of six co-ordinations)
Huihui shiba zhou (18 moslem's elbows)
Qishi ("7 forms" or "7 warriors")
Tongbeiquan (fist of through preparing)
Piguaquan (fist of chopping and hanging)
Bajiquan (fist of eight limits)

:asian:
 
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hopper2002

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But I dind't think they were very popular. Then again I was in Germany at the time, so there wasn't much of a student base to draw from.
 
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arnisador

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Praying mantis (Northern) seems fairly popular to me, but perhaps less so than Wing Chun here in the States.
 
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Hu Ren Qianzai Long

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In China, I'm guessing that it depends on region. But my personal favorite would have to be wushu or hun gar.
 
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Hu Ren Qianzai Long

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COOOOOOOOOL:asian: :asian: :asian: :asian: :asian: :asian: :asian: :asian: :asian:
 

Matt Stone

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Originally posted by Sanxiawuyi

...During many years they exchanged martial arts with the Han race.

Didn't know there was a moslem race...

It is hard to say which styles of wushu are moslem styles. Below are styles popular among all the huizu ("moslems").

First, I believe the correct (politically and grammatically) spelling is muslim not moslem.

Second, given that Islam is primarily a pacificst religion (not that popular politics and world news would ever lead you to that conclusion based on those sources alone), it would be incorrect to say anything is popular among "all the huizu ("moslems")."

Lastly, don't forget to add Xingyiquan to your list. I believe it is Hubei Xingyi that was popularly practiced among muslim communities in China many years back...


:samurai: :samurai:
 
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RyuShiKan

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Originally posted by Chiduce

Dr. William Durbin/Soke is the Headmaster Kiyojute Ryu Kempo Bugei. His insights on okinawan history made him a consultant on the McCarthy Bubishi Translation.

Well knowing Mr. McCarthy, his research and many of the people he has worked to produce the Bubishi with all I can say to that statement is Bull S@#t!
When he lived in Japan I would occasionally go to Pat's house while he was writting the Tuttle version of the Bubishi...........can't ever remember hearing Durbin's name at all. The only thing I know Durbin from is his relation with the bogus "Dr." Sacharnoski and his Jukkokai Combat Ki. :rolleyes:
 
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