Most Difficult Belt Rank?

What is the Most Difficult Belt Rank?

  • WHITE

  • Middle GUP Ranks

  • Upper GUP Ranks

  • BLACK


Results are only viewable after voting.

cali_tkdbruin

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I wanted to raise this questions to the members of this forum since I hadn't seen it discussed here before, what do you think is the most difficult belt rank?

IMHO, and from my own experience, 10th gup-WHITE, is one of the hardest ranks (beside BLACK) because everything is so new and intimidating. Learning just the TKD basics, terminology and MA protocol seemed so difficult back then. It was like when I first joined the US military as a brand new fresh faced recruit. I felt like a fish out of water, completely lost in the new endeavor.

Through the middle ranks (GREEN, etc.), even though I began to see the ranks thin out because of people dropping out, I think it becomes easier because you get a better understanding of what is expected of you as a TKD practitioner. Especially for me because at that point I had my mind set on seeing this journey through all the way to the dan ranks.

I think the higher gup ranks get difficult again because not only must one know everything learned in the lower ranks, in addition, the techniques required get much harder.

Currently, as a 1st dan I'm beginning to learn so many new things now that the Sabumnim saves only for the BLACKS. So, the difficulty factor has definitely increased a big notch. It seems like it all starts again at 1st dan, but, at least I don't feel like I have 2 left feet like I did when I was a WHITE belt.

I'm sure others will disagree, but, this is just my take...
:asian:
 
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Chuck

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Maybe because I had been a Whitebelt at three previous traning halls, I didn;t think too much about starting over again. It was during my time as a blue and red belt that I had difficulty getting my self into class and facing another workout. My blackbelt test, though the longest and toughest physically and mentally, was easier than some of my previous tests because I was fianlly facing whether I felt I derserved it. I flet that I had earned the test, my instructors felt I earned my First Dan.

Our instrucotrs in TKD never really saved anything but advanced forms (poomsae) after blackbelt. When they feel you are ready for a sparring or self-defens technique they teach it to you. The only thing that is really new is the weapons training. There was none before Black Belt.
 
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Rob_Broad

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I would have to say white belt is the hardest rank because at this stage everything is new. You are in unfamiliar territory, and things seem overwhelming.
 

Zepp

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I definitely have to say black. So much more is expected of you physically, and added to that, you're supposed to help instruct the lower belts.

"Responsibilty?! Is that what's supposed to go along with power?!"
 
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Jill666

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I didn't mind being a white belt altho I was clumsy and confused- but I was very eager & that helped.

I think the hardest belt in many ways was blue. I had just been a big fish in the beginners' class, and feeling fairly competent. Then I joined the next class, and was just good enough to realize how not-good I was. It was a weird time. Discouraging some days, energising other days.

The same thing has happened now that I'm 1st dan, but I know this is a small part of a loife-long journey, and I have a lot more perspective on it. Things are more exciting and less frustrating most of the time. I can get very aggravated with myself when a new kata is thrown at us and it takes me longer to pick it up than others (not always the case) but that's more about information retention than competence.
 

tshadowchaser

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White belts are so new that they have only to learn, to survive.
Green belts have started learning and now have to start useing their knowledge.
Brown Belts have some knowledge and can tast black, so they are constantly looking at others to correct mistakes and being watched for every mistake they make.
1st black have the basics down, they think they have the knowledge, they are expected to teach, and set a high standard.
Now they stat to learn what the basics are about, and find out how much they still have to learn.
1st black gets my vote

tshadowchaser
:asian:
 

karatekid1975

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I think white belt in TSD was hard. I was clumsy, unflexible, confused, but boy did I love it! Green was the next hardest rank. I just started developing good technique, and I had to start learning one of the hardest forms I have ever learned, pyung ahn ee dan, for me, anyways. I go my blue belt, and I was still learning pyung ahn ee dan! I also had to break for the first time at green. That was scary at first.

In TKD, it was being white belt again. I wasn't allowed to do stuff that I already knew how to do :( :mad: After that, it was a piece of cake ...... so far, that is. I saw the black belt test. THAT looks hard.

In Judo, I am a white belt :D Can't say much about it yet, except the breakfalls hurt like a b**ch still LOL.
 

Kempojujutsu

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It is more mentally and physcialy challenging then all the belts put together for me. Before my 1st BB test I told my instructor "I didn't feel like I was ready". Maybe it was the thought of acheivement or reaching my goal, that made me feel that a way. I have seen grown men cry when they reach Black Belt. Never seen it at any other belt
Bob :asian:
 

Damian Mavis

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I think it's really based on what school you go to. At the school I came up in red belt was the hardest for me. At red belt you joined the black belt class and that is when I almost quit TKD. I would have to spar with no safety gear against black belt to 4th degree's who would literally make me bleed. I got my nose broken, loose teeth, black eyes, busted lips, sore guts, sore jaw..... ya it was not fun and I was a gentle soul back then. I came sooooo close to quitting but somehow I gave myself a kick in the *** and I started defending myself better and stopped getting hurt as much.....AND stopped caring about getting hurt as much. Now nothing about hard training scares me but it was a large obstacle in my mind to overcome way back at red belt level. Since then nothing has seemed very difficult at any rank I have achieved. But red belt was a hard time for me.

Damian Mavis
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Langdow

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I completely agree with you Mr. Mavis.
I believe each instructor puts a more difficult emphasis on different belt ranks, and then individual students will find different challenges along the way. Because MA is an individual growth it's impossible (I believe) to really determine which belt rank is hardest.
Another example from my school would be, white belt is considered the most difficult because it's assumed that everything is knew. You get alot of material thrown at you, and there are alot of rules of the dojang, courtesies, protocol, etc . . . that need to be learned. Just because of the sheer amount of information thrown its expected that this is the most difficult belt rank especially since the learning curve is just begininning and at its lowest. This is why I voted for white belt.
But keep in mind the higher you go the material does become more difficult, responsibilities increase, more is expected . . . but because of an increased growth curve this becomes easier. The idea at my school as you progress through the ranks is that you learn to learn.

But like I said earlier, this can be different from school to school. Is it the best idea or way to teach, probably not, but it works for me.

Regards
 
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Cliarlaoch

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White Belt's not an easy place to be... you're stuck doing all sorts of things really poorly that EVERYBODY ELSE IN THE ROOM makes it look like Jackie Chan. Not exactly motivating. That's one of the hardest stages, committing to the discipline of the art.

Then there's the second test, that is, when you get close to the goal of Black Belt, and you start questioning yourself and the very reasons you're doing it at all. It's possibly become routine, or a hassle. At that point, you have to figure out what it is you want from the Arts, and then determine if you have the desire and the capacity to achieve it. That usually sets in at Red Belt/Purple Belt/Brown Belt and that range. It's not an easy time.

Being a Black Belt presents its own challenges, not just responsibility. Between the classes, the instruction, and all the other yardwork you have to do, you end up having to figure out where it is you want to continue towards with your abilities and your style. Should you become a master 20-40 years down the road? Should you become an instructor, or should you branch out and try something new or to piece together a new style? Lots of options. What do we do with the skills we have? When are we justified in using them? A lot of such questions hit us about at Black Belt, if not even earlier.

All stages of the process have their challenges and rewards, I would think. The test is always one of determining how willing you are to do what you want, and to figure out what it is you want in the first place.

That said, I still think that, after 4 years of training 4-5 hours a week just in the dojang alone, that blasted test for Black Belt was probably the craziest, most frightening, and probably the most exhilirating ride of my life.
 

jfarnsworth

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just the beginning of a long journey to physical being, knowledge, refinement, and execution of technique and skill.:asian:
 
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Cliarlaoch

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Originally posted by jfarnsworth
just the beginning of a long journey to physical being, knowledge, refinement, and execution of technique and skill.:asian:

True. The hardest part of the journey is the first step, and that's probably understanding that taking that step past Black Belt is just the beginning (i.e., many still seem to think BB is the final step in the process, sadly!).
 
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Chicago Green Dragon

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I feel that in the begining of your Journey White is the hardest.
Its the time when you start something new and also need to find the dedication to put in the effort to go somewhere with what you have learned.

Everything is new and different. The way you move, act and think. You are being opened up to a new world, with new terms and meanings you have to learn. But, before long the techniques and terms start to stick. The motion flows without thought. Your hands and feet move correctly. The angles and timing come out naturally. The journey is a foot, going forward to new places.

But, when you get to Black. You see that you are on a new Journey again which can also feel hard but in a different way. But, now you know something wonderful is coming.

:soapbox:


Chicago Green
Dragon :asian:
 

karatekid1975

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I just changed dojangs, and I got to keep my blue belt. Problem is, the old dojang I was a 6th gup, now I'm a 4th gup. EEEKKKKKK!!!! There is soooooooo much to learn and catch up on. But I love the new school so much, that I don't care. I'm just going to work hard at it. I just feel like a white belt again, except I have good technique, but yet, I know nothing. It's weird LOL.
 

jfarnsworth

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Originally posted by Cliarlaoch
..Black Belt is just the beginning (i.e., many still seem to think BB is the final step in the process, sadly!).

I totally agree with that.:asian:
 

jfarnsworth

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Originally posted by karatekid1975
I just changed dojangs, and I got to keep my blue belt. Problem is, the old dojang I was a 6th gup, now I'm a 4th gup. EEEKKKKKK!!!! There is soooooooo much to learn and catch up on. But I love the new school so much, that I don't care. I'm just going to work hard at it. I just feel like a white belt again, except I have good technique, but yet, I know nothing. It's weird LOL.

Good lord girl:confused: , You are going to start running out of arts and dojo's if you keep up this pace.;)
 

karatekid1975

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I only changed arts twice :) I went from TSD (not by choice about moving that is) to a McDojang, to another good dojang. I do TKD MDK now which is similar to TSD at higher ranks, so I'm happy :D Hopefully I won't have to move any time soon. Judo is mixed in with TKD so I don't have to take it seperate anymore, so I dropped it ....

Ok, Jason, stop pickin on me :p :D Don't you even pick on my spelling LOL :p
 
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