mixing wing chun

bradtash

Yellow Belt
Joined
Dec 18, 2007
Messages
37
Reaction score
0
Location
Australia
hi everyone,

i have recently started up Hapkido about 2 months ago and loving it. i train 3 nights a week.
however i am looking for that little extra, i have always been facinated in wing chun and have found a school that offers 3 classes per week and they do not interfere at all with my Hapkido nights.

so my question is would it be suitable to train in both arts simultaneously?
i mean they seem to have similar aspects (only from what i have seen) and i believe wing chun to have far superior hand and attack work. i do love Hapkido as the throws and joint locks i believe are very helpful for self defence situations but i would also like to add the attack side of wing chun.

my wife is doing the same as me but she was under the impression that both may colide and we would end up confused. she thinks we should do either boxing or muay thai to supplement the Hapkido.

please dont take me wrong, i am not wanting to learn to be able to attack someone. i am in the process of joining the police and would like to learn as much as i can before i am accepted (about a year and a half). also for my wife to learn as well as she will have times by herself when i am work.

any help would be great guys.
we are not extremely fit but we are not really out of shape either. we are willing to train as much as possible.

thanks.
brad.
 

profesormental

Brown Belt
Joined
Jun 12, 2006
Messages
416
Reaction score
6
Greetings.

As with all martial arts and training regimes, it depends on the individual instructor and your personal goals.

If you have the time, go for it and enjoy!

I would if I had the time.

And kudos for involving the wife!!! As many will tell you, that issue can become... complicated... yet extremely funny if it is NOT happening to you! ;)

Juan M. Mercado
 

geezer

Grandmaster
MT Mentor
Joined
Oct 20, 2007
Messages
7,369
Reaction score
3,582
Location
Phoenix, AZ
hi everyone,

i have recently started up Hapkido about 2 months ago and loving it. i train 3 nights a week.
however i am looking for that little extra, i have always been facinated in wing chun and have found a school that offers 3 classes per week and they do not interfere at all with my Hapkido nights...so my question is would it be suitable to train in both arts simultaneously?.

Professor Juan has it right. You might be able to handle both, you might not, but if your instructors are not supportive of your cross training, you are in for an ugly lesson in Martial Arts narrow mindedness. This was a very touchy issue with my first sifu. At that time I cross trained in Escrima. He just barely tolerated that, and only because he was on friendly terms with my Escrima instructor. Most other Martial Arts would have been verboten.

If, on the other hand, you run into two open minded instructors (one at each school) then it's really up to you to make it work. If you have enough time and energy to effectively train in both arts, and more to the point, if you can make them work ato complement each other, then you can really benefit. On the other hand, you may wish to spend a bit longer in your core system so that you can ingrain your basics more deeply and not get confused.

Now all that said, I just got back from a four hour seminar focusing on closing from weapons, through empty hands, taking it to the ground and grappling. It was taught by my current Escrima instructor and a BJJ instructor. Neither of them disrespected my Wing Tsun. They just opened my eyes to whole new worlds, and gave me some tools that I can use with what I already know. Since the people I train with now are open minded, you can be sure I will explore this stuff more deeply in the future. So for me the answer to the cross training question is "yes". You will just have to see what works for you.
 

martyg

Yellow Belt
Joined
Aug 29, 2008
Messages
51
Reaction score
2
Location
Milwaukee, Wisconsin
Brad - the issue with instructors not wanting you to cross train right away doesn't always have to do with narrow mindedness. It also has to do with building a solid foundation in that art - which can often be hard to do with a new student if their "foundation" is being laid by multiple instructors and arts. Arts and their instructors often have different goals, game plans, needs, etc. Not all things fit together, and at this point you need some experience in one or the other before you can see that.

I think if you're looking at both arts to try and decide which one you like and want to train in, that's one thing. But if you're looking to mix them off the bat, I think that's a bad idea. Get a foundation in one or the other first, and then revisit the other if you like. You may find your tastes, needs, and opinions will have changed in the interim.
 

dungeonworks

Black Belt
Joined
May 7, 2006
Messages
540
Reaction score
18
I started Tae Kwon Do, then went to Koei-Kan-Karate-Do, which I would claim as my base style. I also kickboxed and dabbled in a few other arts and am now into Yip Man family Wing Chun. Life would have been easier had I started with Wing Chun first! LOL When I refference "Wing Chun", please be advised it is also spelled Wing Tsun, Ving Tsun, and a few other ways, but it is what it is....Wing Chun. As with Karate, there are other types within the same style and I would not hesitate to try any of them.

That being said, I think both styles, Hapkido and Wing Chun, are different enough to no conflict with eachother. Actually, the problem I think you will have training 6 classes per week is what do you practice in you one day of spare time? Other than that, if you are fortunate to train two arts, I'd do it in a heart beat were it me!

My Sifu is very well versed (master level) in the Aiki-Jujutsu and Wing Chun (among others). He can flow from one art to the other instinctively. You may find the same success between Hapkido and Wing Chun.

Good luck!
 

KamonGuy2

Master of Arts
Joined
Nov 28, 2005
Messages
1,884
Reaction score
19
Location
London, United Kingdom
I had a student who had doen apkido before and found wing chun difficult. But I think it might have been more down to his personality than his technical skill and capabilities

My advice - give it a try. What's the worst that can happen?

Hey and Geezer made black belt - well done Geez
 

Si-Je

Master Black Belt
Joined
Sep 14, 2006
Messages
1,033
Reaction score
17
Location
Texas
Ever heard the old proverb, "empty your cup, so I can fill it with my knowledge?"
In this case, if you want to train both, you'll have to get two cups.

Meaning, Hapkido's aproach to fighting is more circular in motion with the joint locks, throws, and such. And the techniques will have more of a 1,2,3 method in execution.

Your wing chun will be focused on constantly moving forward into your opponent. Simoltaneously defending and attacking.

This being so you'll need two hats, so to speak. This could seriously conflict and confuse your training in both later on, if you don't put on your "Hapkido hat" in that class and your "wing chun hat" in the other class. If you can switch to both ways of thinking, then training should be great.
Hapkido will show you some really neat ways to deflect and opponent, and wing chun will show you different ways to deflect the opponent.
6 months down the road will be the tell tale time. You'll probably develop and preference for one or the other and favor that one due to your personal philosophies, and approaches to self defense. This is fine, and what we all do.
Enjoy both classes, just bring your empty cup to each class to show respect, and open yourself to that style of teaching without letting the other style conflict.
 

dungeonworks

Black Belt
Joined
May 7, 2006
Messages
540
Reaction score
18
Ever heard the old proverb, "empty your cup, so I can fill it with my knowledge?"
In this case, if you want to train both, you'll have to get two cups.

Meaning, Hapkido's aproach to fighting is more circular in motion with the joint locks, throws, and such. And the techniques will have more of a 1,2,3 method in execution.

Your wing chun will be focused on constantly moving forward into your opponent. Simoltaneously defending and attacking.

This being so you'll need two hats, so to speak. This could seriously conflict and confuse your training in both later on, if you don't put on your "Hapkido hat" in that class and your "wing chun hat" in the other class. If you can switch to both ways of thinking, then training should be great.
Hapkido will show you some really neat ways to deflect and opponent, and wing chun will show you different ways to deflect the opponent.
6 months down the road will be the tell tale time. You'll probably develop and preference for one or the other and favor that one due to your personal philosophies, and approaches to self defense. This is fine, and what we all do.
Enjoy both classes, just bring your empty cup to each class to show respect, and open yourself to that style of teaching without letting the other style conflict.

Excellent piece of advice! :ultracool Hapkido is a cool art, I just am not into the argyle Dobak's! :barf:
 

Yoshiyahu

Master Black Belt
Joined
Jul 1, 2008
Messages
1,351
Reaction score
14
Location
St.Louis Missouri
You Said:
i believe wing chun to have far superior hand and attack work. i do love Hapkido as the throws and joint locks i believe are very helpful for self defence situations


Yoshiyahu Said: I Totally agree with you. Wing Chun and Hapkido could be a great Mix. My Wing Chun instructuor often taught that having more than one Art would make you a versatile fighter. He taught me a little of the Five Animals. Mostly to build a stong foundation with the stances and steps of the five Animals. But the main focus was Wing Chun all the way. But I also learn northern Shaloin Kicks. Which can be useful to confuse foes. But since you are studying to be a police Officer, Wing Chun would provide useful techniques for evading and blocking strikes to your face. My instructor often shares with me that styles like Baguazhang or TaeKwonDo would compliment my Wing Chun very well. The reason he suggested TKD is because sometimes people who know you are an inside fighter will try to play the outside game. But if your skilled in fighting outside they will grow tired of the endless kicks to face and body, and try to bridge the gap. Thats when your Wing Chun inclose fighting kicks. Using your sensitivity to flow through your opponents defenses an destroy their structure, bridge and gates.

You may not Know: Wing Chun also has Take Downs and Joint Locks. It usually falls under Chin Na techniques. You may also want to purchase an Hapkido book or Chin Na book with all 70 Chin Na Techniques for your library. This will help your understanding of your art greatly. Since your doing take downs and Joint Locks theres no way Wing Chun will interfer. I suggest you asked your Wing Chun instructor if they allow free sparring. If Not be friend two to three classmates and spar on your one day off. Lol...This way you can test both your Wing Chun and Hapakido. You do not need to really make an issue that you study Hapkido. Some instructors realize people practice other arts before they came to their schools. Like me I practice Akido, Judo and Kick Boxing when I was a young Kid. Now I practice Wing Chun along with Tai Chi and BaGua. I still use alot of Akido techniques with the wing chun. Alot of the techniques are the same especially Wrist locks. Wing Chun has some throws and take downs as well. But What you need is combat. You need a skilled fighting opponent who can resist your throws and joint locks so you can see what works. Because in the streets many people practice different arts. My Wing Chun instructor has taught me how to evade joint locks and throws. So In a sparring match you would have a hard time trying to use your Hapkido on me. But Hapkido is a very great safe way to subdue your opponents with out actually striking them.Wing Chun blocks will help you protect your face from getting smashed by Crack heads and Thugs.

Also: I have a friend who is a police officer now. We train together and I share the Wing Chun with him. We also practice various Chin Na applications and Judo moves in addition to that. So he will be well rounded in street. In addition to that my Sihing who is also police officer said that you are given a CPI book. This will is a basic self defense book which has various moves for police officers to administer against the public. He said its good to practice this with someone over and over again so you can become fluent at it. So also when you do become a police officer save that book and pay attention to what they teach you in your self defense class.
 

UrBaN

Yellow Belt
Joined
Sep 13, 2006
Messages
33
Reaction score
0
I had the same doubt when I started Hapkido, 5 years ago. I was already training in Wing Chun for a few years and was afraid of the outcome if I mixed them.

Now I can say that it was a good decision to mix them up. They complement each other very nicely, each one filling the other one's gaps.

Both are excellent and very practical systems, dealing with self defence, not sport.

The only thing that I could advise if I may, is that you have to be in an advanced level in one system, before you cross-train with a second one. You have to have a good understanding of movement, timing, coordination etc. so you can identify the common area and the differences in both systems.
When you feel comfortable with one, start cross-training with the other too.

Enjoy!
 

Yoshiyahu

Master Black Belt
Joined
Jul 1, 2008
Messages
1,351
Reaction score
14
Location
St.Louis Missouri
UrBaN
The only thing that I could advise if I may, is that you have to be in an advanced level in one system, before you cross-train with a second one. You have to have a good understanding of movement, timing, coordination etc.

Yoshiyahu response: Actually Urban he stated he will be going to each class three nights a week. Hapkido and Wing Chun are so different with movements and principles That he would not be able to get them mixed up. Simply its like studying Algrebra and Geometry. They are both Math but if you study both at the same time they are totally different that you won't get the two mixed up. Are its like studying History and Science together at the same time. You will be able to separate the two because they are totally different. So too you have with Wing Chun which is standing art that deals with mostly linear strikes and kicks, traps in the beginning. An Hapkido which is primarily a Art to takedown or throw one opponent using their momentum or force to put them on the ground. So in essence you have too totally separate entities. One is Japanese and the other is Chinese. Its like studing Tai Chi and Karate at the same time. They similiarites. But in beginning the karate will be much harder and in beginning the Tai Chi will be much softer. Both are total opposites in the beginning.
 
Top