Martial arts for dancers?

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Gypsy

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thanks again for all your helpful info:asian:
@ chris parker: it actually looks really good, thanks for the link. I was wondering however if they do the environmental aspects of it such as swimming etc?
 

pmosiun1

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Why I want to study martial arts:
  • self defense
  • weapons training
  • acupressure points

I think self defense is more about being aware of your surrounding, avoid place where there is trouble. Regarding weapon training, maybe pepper spray is better for self defense because in some country and state, carrying a weapon is illegal.

What i'm looking for in martial arts:
  • fluidity of movement
  • more attacking then defense, but have defense as well
  • both striking and kicking
  • not so much as a sport
  • not so much wrestling
  • not so much your own strength rather using your opponents strength

Boxing, kickboxing are quite good. Boxing has striking and kickboxing, punching and kicking. Grappling martial art like brazilian jiu jitsu and judo is also good and helps to use your opponents strength against them.
 
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Chris Parker

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thanks again for all your helpful info:asian:
@ chris parker: it actually looks really good, thanks for the link. I was wondering however if they do the environmental aspects of it such as swimming etc?

Hey Gypsy,

By "they" do you mean "you" (as in myself and my organisation)? If you do, then the answer is yes, we have covered swimming applications in the past, and I'm sure will again.

It's not easy to sum up everything we have covered in my 17 years with our organisation, but to give a bit of an overview, here goes:

- Classical Japanese Martial Arts (specifically those found in the Bujinkan, focusing on the arts we classify as Ninjutsu or Ninjutsu-related; Koto Ryu, Gyokko Ryu, Togakure Ryu, Kukishinden Ryu, and the Ten Chi Jin Ryaku No Maki. Arts such as Takagi Yoshin Ryu and Shinden Fudo Ryu are deemed to be more "Samurai", and we decided a number of years ago to focus on the others instead, but these arts do still make an appearance from time to time).

These arts include unarmed combat (Gyokko Ryu Kosshijutsu, Koto Ryu Koppojutsu, Togakure Ryu Ninpo Taijutsu, Kukishinden Ryu Dakentaijutsu etc) as well as Classical Weaponry (mainly from the Kukishinden Ryu, as well as a bit from Togakure Ryu; Sword, Hanbo [3 foot staff], Jo [4 foot staff], Bo [6 foot staff], Kusari Fundo [weighted chain], Shuriken [senban square shaped throwing blades, as well as the spike version, bo shuriken], Shuko [Togakure Ryu hand claws]. From time to time we also cover other more exotic weapons such as Naginata, Spear (straight spear and Kama Yari, sickle spear), Kusari Gama and Kyoketsu Shoge, and many others.

- Modern Street Defence. This section is more of a Reality Based approach to the classical tactics and strategies found in the scrolls, and incorporates legal understandings of what constitues an assault, reasonable force, when you can (and should!) hit first, group assaults, weapon assaults (knife, club such as baseball bat or short baton, chain, pistol, shotgun) and more.

- Modern Self Protection Concepts. This includes areas we refer to as Partner Protection (how to defend yourself when you are with friends, family, or your partner, as well as how to defend them if they get into situation), Buddy Guarding (body guarding principles adapted for use in a more social setting, to be aware of the potential dangers, and keep your friends and family safe from them, very applicable to people with small children who get approached by people they don't know, not very martial [no hitting people in this part], but very very useful to know), Anti Surveilance (to be aware of when you are being targeted, and how to escape, very good if you travel to certain areas), Defensive Driving (not what is taught in driving schools, this is more how to protect yourself against road rage situations, and came from again body guarding skills designed to defend against being car jacked, and your principle being kidnapped), and again, more.

- Survival Skills. This includes such fun things as abseiling and rock climbing, through to orienteering and bush survival skills, and water and rope climbing skills. And once again, more.

- Holistic Skills. This includes various health-realted things, such as Shiatsu massage, reflexology, stretching routines and more, and other aspects such as intuition skills (also a part of the Self Protection aspect), and things such as Bhuddist Face Reading, and understanding Body Language.

- Personal Self Development. This is kind of a big thing with us, and includes a number of areas that you are gradually exposed to over your time.

Obviously this is not covered in a short period of time, this is a small sample of the different topics I have taught and been taught over 17 years. If you have any other questions, please feel free to ask.
 

Brian King

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Gypsy there is Systema group in Brisbane. They have brought out some of the best instructors such as Kwan Lee, Alex Kostic, Kevin Secours and in Oct of this year they are bringing out Martin Wheeler. Good group and I think might be worth checking out for you. More information on Systema can be found on Vladimirs web site
http://www.russianmartialart.com

Info on that group in Brisbane and on the Martin Wheeler seminar

Andrew Seyderhelm anseyder@hotmail.com Systema Australia Martin Wheeler is coming to Australia for 2 weekend seminars! This is a major event to have such a highly skilled and regarded senior instructor in Australia. Weekend 1: Brisbane - 24th and 25th October Saturday 12noon - 6.30pm Sunday 10am - 5pm TOPICS: Short Work (strikes, taking strikes etc) Soft work (throws, takedowns, restraints etc) Weekend 2: Sydney - 31st Oct and 1st Nov Saturday 11:30 - 6.30pm Sunday 10am - 5pm TOPICS: Knife fighting Multiple opponents There are very limited spots for each event so book soon! For full details and costs please visit: http://www.systemaaustralia.com/mw2009.html or email me:anseyder@hotmail.com

A clip of Martin doing some work
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YiuXkP9WWaM

You will like this clip especially Gypsy I think, and the two below of Alex Kostic
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=chtRdG3H6gU&feature=rec-HM-fresh+div
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pbvzFXwHJnU&feature=related
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ayNa96_1Vn0&feature=related

A Kevin Secours clip
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=weE71fIR4eg

Gypsy more important than style is finding an instructor that you like and feel comfortable around. Talk to the other students and see if they are the kind of people you want to hang around with. If this checks out then see if the type of work that the style does fits you., Not everyone likes Corvettes some like BMWs styles can be the same way. Some like swing some like salsa and others like hip hop or waltz. You may like all dance but certain styles will just fit you and talk to you, martial arts is often the same way

Good luck and welcome to Martial Talk
Warmest regards
Brian King

P.S LOL I think one of my photo albums here shows some working in the water
Bri
 
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Gypsy

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Flea

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that looks amazing, i can already do some of those moves at the beginning. It looks like a lot of fun. is it true they don't have grading/belts in systema?

This is true. And Brian, why is that exactly? I'm not sure myself. :)
 

Chris Parker

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Hey Flea,

Without getting too far into Systema's history here, the no belts, no ranking thing is realistically simply the way Vladimir and Mikhael set up the system. I feel that it is in no small part a way to differentiate it from the more "Traditional" systems out there, working into the idea that rank does not always equal skill in a real situation. However, to say that there are no rankings is a little incorrect. The ranking system is based on seniority, experience, and certification for instructors. In this way, it actually operates the same way a very traditional Japanese art would, with a ranking system based on particular licences, called Menkyo. Interesting, that.

A former student of my instructors (and one that I spent a degree of time sharing some more priveliged training with as well) has since gone on to study Systema here in Melbourne, and quite enjoys it. He sent me an e-mail a while back to let me know how he was going (not sure why he felt I needed to know, but that's another issue we won't go into here), and said that the lack of ranks were one of the main reasons he enjoyed his Systema training. He went on to say that he found it very similar to what we do, and he was continuing to use what he learnt from us in his Systema classes (?). Although he did also say that without the belts, he was unsure of where he stood in his abilities, but I'm sure that that comes with comfortability in the style.

Gypsy, personally I feel that either Ninjutsu or Systema would be your best bet based on the description you have given of your needs, but as said by myself and others here, I feel that the instructor and the group will be far more important than the particular art itself. So visit each and every you can, ask questions, even join in if you can (I know you can with us, you probably can with the Systema and others as well), and go from there. Really, both Systema and Ninjutsu can be very similar, Ninjutsu will give you a more structure in terms of ranking, and a wider variety of weapons, including classical and modern, Systema will focus more on flow and principles (still a big thing in Ninjutsu, but we have structured techniques to get those concepts across), and be more geared towards just modern situations, whereas we cover both.

But I don't want to sway your decision, and ultimately it will need to be your decision. We can advise as much as you want, but the decision will have to be yours, based on values you have, and experiences you desire. This is why we are suggesting you visit each school, and make up your own mind, whether you go with Systema, or you end up in our schools, I wish you the best, and a great journey in the arts.
 

still learning

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Hello, We notice the women who did "HULU" has stronger legs and abs..throws very strong "kicks" ...and powerful too..!

You may not like wrestling? ...you may want to look into "JUDO" very hands on and pratical for women!

You do grab your partners...than create throws? like dancing?

Aloha, (great for rape preventions) ..more than you think? - JUDO...! good stuffs to learn..
 

Flea

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Another thing, Gypsy, is that I've been told that Systema is particularly male-heavy. It's the only MA I've ever studied so I can't really back that up myself. But I've had a few people try to steer me away from it for that reason. The gender balance isn't an issue for me, but I thought I'd mention it in case it might be for you.

(If anything, I think the high male ratio is an asset for the realism factor. It's much less likely that I'd ever get mugged by a woman. To each their own.)
 
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Gypsy

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thankyou everyone for all you helpful info. I will attempt to visit the schools and try them out, however i am thinking that at the moement i will start out in systema and then later move into ninjutsu if that is the direction that i still wish to take. Thankyou again for all your help and i hope to see you around on the forum :asian:
 

jeorf

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thankyou for all your advice
@Blindside: i live in Brisbane, Australia on the southside if that helps and I was also worried a bit about how i am meant to choose a good instructor since i have no experience in this. any advice?

My husband and I teach TKD to interns at a local physical theater company and he ends the last class with this advice: It doesn't matter what type of martial art you do. Find a good teacher. Go to the school and watch a class or two. Talk to people (if no one comes up to talk to you, leave). See how they treat each other, how the head of the school treats everyone else. Does respect flow between every member of the school? How do men treat women, women treat men? Are they all about proving something, beating each other up, gaining rank quickly? (Fine, if that's what you're looking for, you're there.)

In other words, trust yourself to know a good school when you get there. Enjoy!!!

PS, Studying capoeira is a great excuse to go to Bahia!!!!!!!! (The best education is going to the beach at Barra at about 5-6 at night when there are always people practicing. We'd do our TKD forms and watch them and talk about the differences...)
 

Brian King

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Flea wrote
And Brian, why is that exactly? I'm not sure myself:

Flea, I do not wish to take this thread further off topic. Basically as I understand the belt system is a relatively modern device started with the Japanese sport of Judo. Systema is a Russian system as you know. The Russian style of systems have their roots in the old Russian folk/village styles not in modern Japanese arts and those styles had no ranking/belt systems.

Chris wrote
the no belts, no ranking thing is realistically simply the way Vladimir and Mikhael set up the system. I feel that it is in no small part a way to differentiate it from the more "Traditional" systems out there,

Chris, that has not been my observations experiences or understanding.

Gypsy good luck with your search and your training. Welcome to the forum

Warmest regards
Brian King
 
 

EIH888

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Gypsy

If you want a style that is emphasizes attack more than defense and is good for women, I would highly suggest Wing Chun. [supposedly is was created by a woman..] But it certainly isn't very "flash" or "dancerly"...

If you want something that is more like dance, then I'd suggest bagua, emphasizes circular footwork and movements that, to me, seem a lot like modern dance [did modern and some ballet in uni ;)]
 

still learning

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Judo is not the answer to every question.

Hello, You are right..it is NOT the answer to every question...."What's for dinner"? ...JUDO!

Judo does not use weapons (just defend against them)...

Suggestions was ask? .....just sharing my thoughts.....

Aloha, ...Judo...more than you think...!!!
 

Chris Parker

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The full request included non-sporting, striking over grapppling (wrestling), and weapon use and defence. Judo is not really a good suggestion, still learning, and I note that you seem to put it up every single time regardless of what the requests are. Out of interest, as you don't have Judo listed in your profile (Kempo, if memory serves), why do you keep doing this?
 

blindsage

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Hello, You are right..it is NOT the answer to every question...."What's for dinner"? ...JUDO!

Judo does not use weapons (just defend against them)...

Suggestions was ask? .....just sharing my thoughts.....

Aloha, ...Judo...more than you think...!!!
You didn't answer her question. As a matter of fact whenever anyone asks for any suggestions and gives specific parameters of what they are looking for, you always say "Judo" whether or not it meets any of their parameters. If everyone else can step out of their personal interests in order to try and make constructive suggestions based on the specific interests of the OP, I have a hard time understanding why you insist on just evangelizing Judo in any and all situations. Do you really think this is helping?
 
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