Low reps vs High Reps

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speakman

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Just reading 2 different views of wieght training. WHile this info is from Mixed Martial artist, I would like to know 'where they are coming from'.

Frank Shamrock--Uses 3 sets of excercises where 5-8(slow) reps could be done.
Marco Ruas----3 sets with 15 reps (which usually seems to be the case from what I read-high reps endurance)

But I love to lift wieghts. Heavy weights. So naturally I like Shamrocks idea, BUT is there a catch to the way he does this? It doesn't make much sense to me as to why he would want power over endurance (yet he was in increible aerobic condition).
:idunno:

Help please
 
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speakman

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Well, I figure that strength with ability to move fast would be higher reps, but being a Shamrock fan, I am just wondering where he's coming from.
 

searcher

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speakman said:
Well, I figure that strength with ability to move fast would be higher reps, but being a Shamrock fan, I am just wondering where he's coming from.
Its all about muscle stimulation and growth. You can build muscular endurance with low rep workouts, but you have to increase the number of sets. High rep workouts don't exactly lead to more endurance, they lead to muscular efficiency(being good at what they are doing). This is why you can have conditioning and muscle mass. Rember that muscle contraction, flexibility, and strength are what make you fast. All can be had together.
 

Zujitsuka

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As Searcher said you can have different types of strength at the same time but you cannot really train them at the same time. Some try but if you want to maximize one particular kind of strength, you have to focus on that one, then move on to another.

There are different types of strength:

Brute; speed (explosiveness and starting); muscular endurance; relavite; anaerobic endurance; and aerobic endurance.

Coach Charles Staley (www.myodynamics.com) recommends developing your brute strength first then focusing on speed strength.

So that translates to slow lifts with heavy weights with lower sets and reps (e.g. 2 sets, 3 reps), then progressing to fast lifts with lighter weights with higher sets and reps (e.g. 4 sets, 6 reps).

Folks who want more size tend to have success when lifting moderately heavy weights with a moderate number of sets and reps (e.g. 5 sets, 10 reps).

I hope this helps.
 

arnisador

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I've switched to fewer slow reps. and am happy with the results, but I am only going for tone, not serious muscle.
 
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