Losing my edge or something

Bujingodai

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OK so I have been teaching a lot of years, I have had a number of decent generations of students. Some years ago I retired due to sickness.
Now I am doing better I was coaxed to come out of retirement and teach again. Just a small gig. weekly, in my basement. Very casual.

My students, just can't seem to get anything. Like for one can't show up sometimes, without notice. 2 I have redacted the 1st belt curriculum as it was obvious they are not getting it so I focused a little less on sometimes. Something as simple as a zenpo kaiten, months and they are still approaching it like they can't figure it out.

I don't get it. Normally with our 8th kyu, yellow. Which is just taihenjutsu It's always been kind of a gimmie grade. Ukemi, hrukiwaza, kamae, tobiwaza etc etc. Body basics. But, it's like they forget it all every class

Something I am doing is not doing it. I have to re look at things. Now as by the conversation they are all on ADHD meds. Seems to be a generational thing I guess. But I thought that would create Hyperfocus frankly
 
Our youngsters are straight up murder bots.

So it definitely isn't generational.

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You might just have a bad cohort. Perhaps set them basic homework. If they admit to not doing it, then its their lack of motivation that is the issue. Ask them to leave and get a new bunch

I recently tried my hand at school teaching having been a University lecturer (adult teaching) for many years. It was the most unpleasant experience Ive had due to their behaviour, inability to concentrate and lack of interest.They were like wild animals. I believe theres been a sea-change in young peoples ability to follow instructions and do things they dont particularly enjoy but need to get on in life since I was at school.

I asked the teaching agency to take me off their books and instead take walks along the beach and go out for lunch!
 
You might just have a bad cohort. Perhaps set them basic homework. If they admit to not doing it, then its their lack of motivation that is the issue. Ask them to leave and get a new bunch

I recently tried my hand at school teaching having been a University lecturer (adult teaching) for many years. It was the most unpleasant experience Ive had due to their behaviour, inability to concentrate and lack of interest.They were like wild animals. I believe theres been a sea-change in young peoples ability to follow instructions and do things they dont particularly enjoy but need to get on in life since I was at school.

I asked the teaching agency to take me off their books and instead take walks along the beach and go out for lunch!
I wonder myself. I'm not using any different methods. I have asked them to practice at home. Showed them how say footwork can be used in a daily way. However I just don't see the results of it. I am coming to the conclusion that I need to possibly say the retention isn't there and this needs to be shored up, or discontinued. For me, it's a night of my week. It's in my basement so I am not investing but it's my time. I feel bad about it
 
I wonder myself. I'm not using any different methods. I have asked them to practice at home. Showed them how say footwork can be used in a daily way. However I just don't see the results of it. I am coming to the conclusion that I need to possibly say the retention isn't there and this needs to be shored up, or discontinued. For me, it's a night of my week. It's in my basement so I am not investing but it's my time. I feel bad about it
Ask them if theyre actually doing the homework youre prescribing. As Confucius said, I do not open up the truth to one who is not eager to get knowledge, nor help out any one who is not anxious to explain himself. When I have presented one corner of a subject to any one, and he cannot from it learn the other three, I do not repeat my lesson.
 
ADHD presents in numerous ways -- and hyperfocus is only one of them. Additonally, hyperfocus is VERY topic/issue/moment dependent, so it may or may not help them.

Is this the first group of kids you've taught? What are their backgrounds in general? You can't expect a 7 year old to learn things the same way as a 12 year old or 17 year old... In short -- are your expectations reasonable? It's easy to forget that sort of thing...

Another issue I've had teaching, especially youth, is that I try to teach to where I am today -- rather than where a beginner is. I've tried to teach way more detail and way more complicated elements -- the advanced fundamentals -- before the student has the general parts down. That leads to slow progress and lots of confusion... I often use building a road as an analogy for training -- marking the route, clearing the trees, laying the roadbed, paving, lane striping, etc. In that analogy, I've caught myself trying to paint the lane stripes before the pavement's down...
 
ADHD presents in numerous ways -- and hyperfocus is only one of them. Additonally, hyperfocus is VERY topic/issue/moment dependent, so it may or may not help them.

Is this the first group of kids you've taught? What are their backgrounds in general? You can't expect a 7 year old to learn things the same way as a 12 year old or 17 year old... In short -- are your expectations reasonable? It's easy to forget that sort of thing...

Another issue I've had teaching, especially youth, is that I try to teach to where I am today -- rather than where a beginner is. I've tried to teach way more detail and way more complicated elements -- the advanced fundamentals -- before the student has the general parts down. That leads to slow progress and lots of confusion... I often use building a road as an analogy for training -- marking the route, clearing the trees, laying the roadbed, paving, lane striping, etc. In that analogy, I've caught myself trying to paint the lane stripes before the pavement's down...I
I don't do kids classes anymore. Not for almost 20 years.
These kids are 26-32.
Have tried to make it as basic as can be. While showing the eventual application. Metaphors etc.

It's just something I am missing I figure.
 
OK so I have been teaching a lot of years, I have had a number of decent generations of students. Some years ago I retired due to sickness.
Now I am doing better I was coaxed to come out of retirement and teach again. Just a small gig. weekly, in my basement. Very casual.

My students, just can't seem to get anything. Like for one can't show up sometimes, without notice. 2 I have redacted the 1st belt curriculum as it was obvious they are not getting it so I focused a little less on sometimes. Something as simple as a zenpo kaiten, months and they are still approaching it like they can't figure it out.

I don't get it. Normally with our 8th kyu, yellow. Which is just taihenjutsu It's always been kind of a gimmie grade. Ukemi, hrukiwaza, kamae, tobiwaza etc etc. Body basics. But, it's like they forget it all every class

Something I am doing is not doing it. I have to re look at things. Now as by the conversation they are all on ADHD meds. Seems to be a generational thing I guess. But I thought that would create Hyperfocus frankly
how regimented and/or relaxed is it now as compared to how you taught before?
 
ADHD presents in numerous ways -- and hyperfocus is only one of them. Additonally, hyperfocus is VERY topic/issue/moment dependent, so it may or may not help them.
How convenient for them
 
Well, when I started teaching this class, it was more regimented. I wanted to teach the class etiquette. Along with class. But there was no retention. Like it would just have to be re taught like they never learned it every class. When I taught before, it was very regimented class was flowing.
I had to cut out a lot of what I was teaching as it was too much. Students having to come off the mats and take breaks as they were too stressed.
 
I don't do kids classes anymore. Not for almost 20 years.
These kids are 26-32.
Have tried to make it as basic as can be. While showing the eventual application. Metaphors etc.

It's just something I am missing I figure.
I doubt youre missing anything. That generation cannot function without a reflexly nodding their heads down to their phones every 10 seconds, they are unable to follow (even written) instructions (we used to demonstrate that each year to the new university students) and they generally lack motivation. Some will be able to do these things and thosebyoung people will make progress, but remember the MA have always had a high attrition rate.
 
Well, when I started teaching this class, it was more regimented. I wanted to teach the class etiquette. Along with class. But there was no retention. Like it would just have to be re taught like they never learned it every class. When I taught before, it was very regimented class was flowing.
I had a 50-something student who couldnt retain anything. We worried she had a neurological issue but she had a masters in music and was very high up in the world of shamanism and all their intricacies. As it turned out she just came along to wave a sword, missed many weeks at a time and never thought about Iai when she wasnt in the class and thats why she doesnt get any better. Im told she still occasionally attends the class.
I had to cut out a lot of what I was teaching as it was too much. Students having to come off the mats and take breaks as they were too stressed.
We had university students who required rest periods every 15 minutes during classes! The medical school refused to accommodate those types of things saying that they wouldnt get, for example, a break as a doctor in the emergency room during a 2 hour resuscitation!
 
Well, when I started teaching this class, it was more regimented. I wanted to teach the class etiquette. Along with class. But there was no retention. Like it would just have to be re taught like they never learned it every class. When I taught before, it was very regimented class was flowing.
I had to cut out a lot of what I was teaching as it was too much. Students having to come off the mats and take breaks as they were too stressed.
Did a little web research about teaching people with ADHD

Information delivery​

  • Give instructions one at a time and repeat as necessary.
  • If possible, work on the most difficult material early in the day.
  • Use visuals: charts, pictures, color coding.
  • Create outlines for note-taking that organize the information as you deliver it.

Are there to many distractions. Could be the informality of the basement....
 
Complaints that the younger generation is lacking in discipline, respect, and work ethic go back as far as written history. I don't believe it's any more true today than it was for the ancient Greeks. In fact, I know plenty of young people who have way more maturity and discipline than I did at their age. (BTW, I do have ADD, which wasn't diagnosed until I was around 50, but I don't think that's been a real obstacle for me in my martial arts career.)

@Bujingodai , I think there are probably multiple possible explanations for the results you are seeing in your students, but you'd probably have to do some investigation to figure out which might apply to your situation.
  1. How large is your student group? If it's relatively small, you might have just randomly gotten a less dedicated group than you had before. If you are comparing hundreds of students now to hundreds of students previously, then the statistical variations should average out and any differences are probably due to changes in your instruction. But if you're just talking about 5-10 students, then you might just have gotten a group which is less focused/dedicated/talented/in-tune with your teaching style/whatever.
  2. You say that you are teaching just once weekly. Honestly, that isn't really enough for the average student to make significant ongoing progress. There are individuals who have the drive to achieve significant growth with classes once per week, but they are the exception and you have to do some work or get lucky to recruit/select a full group of such students. This applies even more so for arts which aren't based around solo forms that the student can naturally practice on their own time.
  3. Your instructional style may very well have changed. Teaching is a skill which has to be practiced, just like martial arts techniques. You may have to consciously work to regain the connection with students that you had back when you were teaching regularly. My instructional style has changed over time, but that development is based on many years of regularly trying different things out and watching the results, week in and week out, for hundreds of students. Since you've been out of teaching for a while, you may have to start that whole process over again.
 
Complaints that the younger generation is lacking in discipline, respect, and work ethic go back as far as written history. I don't believe it's any more true today than it was for the ancient Greeks. In fact, I know plenty of young people who have way more maturity and discipline than I did at their age. (BTW, I do have ADD, which wasn't diagnosed until I was around 50, but I don't think that's been a real obstacle for me in my martial arts career.)

@Bujingodai , I think there are probably multiple possible explanations for the results you are seeing in your students, but you'd probably have to do some investigation to figure out which might apply to your situation.
  1. How large is your student group? If it's relatively small, you might have just randomly gotten a less dedicated group than you had before. If you are comparing hundreds of students now to hundreds of students previously, then the statistical variations should average out and any differences are probably due to changes in your instruction. But if you're just talking about 5-10 students, then you might just have gotten a group which is less focused/dedicated/talented/in-tune with your teaching style/whatever.
  2. You say that you are teaching just once weekly. Honestly, that isn't really enough for the average student to make significant ongoing progress. There are individuals who have the drive to achieve significant growth with classes once per week, but they are the exception and you have to do some work or get lucky to recruit/select a full group of such students. This applies even more so for arts which aren't based around solo forms that the student can naturally practice on their own time.
  3. Your instructional style may very well have changed. Teaching is a skill which has to be practiced, just like martial arts techniques. You may have to consciously work to regain the connection with students that you had back when you were teaching regularly. My instructional style has changed over time, but that development is based on many years of regularly trying different things out and watching the results, week in and week out, for hundreds of students. Since you've been out of teaching for a while, you may have to start that whole process over again.
All makes a lot of sense. My classes used to be around 40, after last 10-15 years more like 10. Now it is 4-5.
Once a week is all they can do. It used to be a weekend every other week for a 5hr, Now it is a 2 hr on Mondays. Between kids and work etc. All they could agree on was 1 night. Normally I did 2 a week.
 
Complaints that the younger generation is lacking in discipline, respect, and work ethic go back as far as written history. I don't believe it's any more true today than it was for the ancient Greeks. In fact, I know plenty of young people who have way more maturity and discipline than I did at their age.
Yyyep, thanks for saying this Tony.
 
Complaints that the younger generation is lacking in discipline, respect, and work ethic go back as far as written history.
I think the focus of their lacking changes with each generation. But their music is rubbish, they should get a haircut and cleaning their shoes occasionally wouldnt hurt.
 
I don't know if it their age, it's more what their age focuses on. Or what everyone's age has in their perspective.

I'm going to use the advice of writing more out to reference I have whiteboards. Teaching the more difficult at the beginning of class. When I was learning the more complex was always best last, as I was tired physically so my flow had less to do with muscle and more muscle memory. Worked for me, likely not for them. I will keep a log of this. As possibly I just got very lucky in the past.
 
Heres an idea: have you asked them how theyd like to learn? They might have some ideas.
 

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