Kenpo Manuals

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brianhunter

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Out of all the guys out there selling Kenpo manuals (by belt, forms etc.) Who out there would you say is the best? I have seen the Kenpo 2000 manuals and I was very impressed with the info inside. What else is out there what do you guys like???
 
Brian, i just got Mr Tatums journal...i highly recommend it

shawn monday:cool:
 
I actually like the original IKKA manuals. They set the standard for everyone else.
 
Originally posted by Rob_Broad

I actually like the original IKKA manuals. They set the standard for everyone else.

Rob,

Were you always IKKA or did you start in Tracy's Kenpo? If so, when did you switch over (i.e. rank & year) to WKKA? Just curious since I saw you mentioned a Tracy's technique as one of your favorites on the other thread.

jb:asian:
 
Originally posted by jbkenpo



Rob,

Were you always IKKA or did you start in Tracy's Kenpo? If so, when did you switch over (i.e. rank & year) to WKKA? Just curious since I saw you mentioned a Tracy's technique as one of your favorites on the other thread.

jb:asian:

I originally started in the tracey system in 1981, in 1989 I start in AK, I continued to train in the Tracy system until 1993 at which time I left as a 4th degree Black Belt. The Tracy's technique I posted wasn't one of my favorites, someone else named it their favorite and another person asked what the techniques was. I just posted a quick version of the technique. As for the WKKA I was only with them for a year and half, it was too political for me.

Basically I just go where the knowledge is, if an instructor is hosting a seminar and it is something I want to learn I go. I am not worried about attaining new rank at this time.

Currently I am in an "Back to basics" mode where I am re-ananlyzing every form, every set, and all 154 techniques and their extensions. A lot of play with the equation formula and really working on the fundamentals again is where i am at these days.
 
Originally posted by Rob_Broad



I originally started in the tracey system in 1981, in 1989 I start in AK, I continued to train in the Tracy system until 1993 at which time I left as a 4th degree Black Belt. The Tracy's technique I posted wasn't one of my favorites, someone else named it their favorite and another person asked what the techniques was. I just posted a quick version of the technique. As for the WKKA I was only with them for a year and half, it was too political for me.

Basically I just go where the knowledge is, if an instructor is hosting a seminar and it is something I want to learn I go. I am not worried about attaining new rank at this time.

Currently I am in an "Back to basics" mode where I am re-ananlyzing every form, every set, and all 154 techniques and their extensions. A lot of play with the equation formula and really working on the fundamentals again is where i am at these days.

Good honest answers...So who (what instructor) actually worked you through the 154 AK techniques and all the extentions? Or are you still exploring them? I couldn't figure that out from your website....

Thanks, jb:asian:
 
Originally posted by jbkenpo



Good honest answers...So who (what instructor) actually worked you through the 154 AK techniques and all the extentions? Or are you still exploring them? I couldn't figure that out from your website....

Thanks, jb:asian:

When I started AK I started with Joe Foster and went through the base 154 techniques before he went and started creatinghis own material. Between 1992 and 1995 I bounced around from seminar to seminar to seminar, where I met Mike and Mark Masterson who took me through the extensions. Mike and Mark Masterson are Kara ho instrustors who originally started in AK. In 2000 I met Steve Stewart and that was my exposure to the WKKA, I started working at white belt with him, under him I was ranked as a 3rd degree brown belt until we parted ways in in the summer of 2001.

I have put together an video collection since the mid 80's and I see the similarities between the Tracy's material and AK, I find there to be more personal expression in AK. Hope this answers all your questions, if not fire away, I am here to answer.
 
Originally posted by Rob_Broad

Hope this answers all your questions, if not fire away, I am here to answer.

Why the switch?
 
Originally posted by Kirk



Why the switch?

I prefer the quality, not the quantity. I prefer the scientific approach of AK, not the because I said so approach of the Tracy's. There were also political reason for leaving the Tracy system completely.
 
The only ones I have are distributed by my instructor, and I think he wrote them himself. They are written very well with just a few mis-spelled words being the only problem I've seen.

I've never seen any of the other manuals, are there ways to purchase them without being in the respective organization?

I would really like to get the IKKA ones as they're the ones everyone talks about so often.


:asian:
 
Originally posted by Rob_Broad


Hope this answers all your questions, if not fire away, I am here to answer.

Once again I respect your honest reply and your journey...

jb:asian:
 
I would love to get my hands on a copy of a few of those Ed Parker manuals, but they are rather spendy. Who all here has them and are they worth it? In other words, do they go in depth into the techniques rather then just a description?
 
from the shameless endorsements dept...

I have all of the manuals that Ed sells. They are excellent in the quality of the material, organization etc. as one would expect from the source of the material; his fathers notes. You won't go wrong by purchasing them.

On a side note... in my travels I have seen a fair share of pirated versions of Ed's manuals and it really ticks me off to see them out there. The majority of them are people letting thier friends photocopy their legitimate original copy. Please, if you see this happenning, discourage the practice. It is illegal and will only hurt all of us in the end. Sorry, just had to say it. I belive they are a fine product and the man deserves the income for his efforts to help us out.


Peace,
Sandor
 
Originally posted by Kenpo Wolf

I would love to get my hands on a copy of a few of those Ed Parker manuals, but they are rather spendy. Who all here has them and are they worth it? In other words, do they go in depth into the techniques rather then just a description?

The tech manuals and forms manuals offer a pretty high resultion look at the material. They are not like Skip Hancocks books that I've seen in the sense that tons of explorations are paraded out afterwards. They do go a long way into communicating the techs and forms in the proper syntactic Kenpo terms for the movements.

As for the price... I don't think they are unreasonable. I've bought technical books that topped at $185. Considering that most technical manuals of any topic worth purchasing are usually in the 50-70 USD range they are quite a bargain.

Peace,
Sandor
 
Originally posted by Kenpo Wolf

I would love to get my hands on a copy of a few of those Ed Parker manuals, but they are rather spendy. Who all here has them and are they worth it? In other words, do they go in depth into the techniques rather then just a description?

I did'nt mean a bootleg copy if it came across that way. Sorry for the misunderstanding. What I meant is I would like to buy a original copy, what a oxymoron(spl), from the EPJ's site. I will definitely buy the journals as soon as I finish paying off my truck in a few months. Thanks a lot for the excellent advice.
 
I have most of the IKKA manuals. I also have Kenpo2000 manuals thru 1st Brown. I even have a manual or two from Eric Lamkin at www.arnis.com. He produces and excellent, informative, and clear set of manuals.
 
Originally posted by Kenpo Wolf



I did'nt mean a bootleg copy if it came across that way. Sorry for the misunderstanding. What I meant is I would like to buy a original copy, what a oxymoron(spl), from the EPJ's site. I will definitely buy the journals as soon as I finish paying off my truck in a few months. Thanks a lot for the excellent advice.

I didn't interpret your question as a request for a bootleg copy. I did however feel it necessary to point out to the group as a whole that the bootleg industry in our art is way out of hand.

I get requests all the time from folks (some of them even post in this forum) asking if I would make them a copy of this tape or that manual, in a barter, for a reduced fee, or, more often then not, for free.

It bothers me to see it happen because the consumer base for anyone who is marketing a product as specific as a tech manual or video for Kenpo is actually pretty small to begin with, never mind the amount of folks who actually would buy those items in that particular niche market. It would really surprise me if the actual number of kenpo video sales topped 2,000 units in a year for all of them across the entire Kenpo genre, yet it is very rare that I go somewhere and not see bootlegs of videos and manuals in peoples collections.

I once took Ed Jr. to a seminar that he was instructing and there, right before our eyes, was an entire school filled with bootleg copies of the tech manuals. Only difference was the cover had the name of a certain selfproclaimed '*cough* SGM *cough*' on it and the copyright info conveniently missing from the pages. Other than that they were exactly(word for word and page number for page number and format) the same. Of course, that person denied actually pirating the work and insisted they were his original works. So, the sad reality of it is that the manuals are even being pirated by school owners who sell them and keep the monies to themselves. I don't think we'll be back there anytime soon...

My point, after all this ranting... is... We need to be very open and honest about the issue and actively discourage the practice. It is STEALING whether or not folks want to own up to the facts. They become thieves by participating in the bootlegging process.

When folks purchase these items they support the folks who do a lot of hard work to put them in our hands and maybe continue to give them the incentive to continue thier efforts. If we don't and turn a blind eye then, eventually the lesson in futility is driven home and there will not be any new products put to this particular market.

Peace,
Sandor
 
The point at which a demand curve intersects a supply curve is called the point of equilibrium, the point at which buyers are happy to buy and sellers are happy to sell.

It would seem to me that the prices of most martial arts media are WAY above the point of equilibrium, sic. Larry Tatum tapes at nearly 瞿25 each, it's ridiculous.

If they charge above equilibrium, then people are inclined not to buy things. Say someone could supply a Larry Tatum tape for 瞿10 that was bootleg, maybe I'd be happy to pay that, say it was 瞿15, maybe I'd stretch to that, if it got above that then no, it's too expensive.

So look, we've found a point of equilibrium (for me as a consumer), which is 60% of the market price.

The point is that suppliers are stimulating the black market by inflating prices, they bring it on themselves. VHS re-production can be found at very competetive prices, so I can't believe they're going to be oporating at a loss by reducing the prices to something more reasonable.

As for books, I don't know as much about that, but I can only imagine it's a similar situation, although getting books printed is more complex and costly than getting tapes reproduced.

The point is that you're not depriving a company of the money if you were never going to buy the good in the first place. That doesn't make buying bootleg stuff right, it's just a fact.

Ian.
 

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