Keeping students in the age of Covid

J. Pickard

Yellow Belt
Joined
Jun 8, 2020
Messages
24
Reaction score
10
How are other schools managing retention in the age of covid? We lost a lot of students and haven't gained any new ones in almost a year which has never happened before. I can't lower our rates any more without it resulting in closing our doors but many of our students are leaving because they can't afford it anymore, a few have left because they don't want to wear a mask and said they will come back when Covid is under control. Since last February we have lost over 50% of our students due to financial reasons or health concerns. Has anyone else run into similar problems? any tips on how to manage this?
Thanks.
P.S. located in USA in the northern Midwest.
 

JowGaWolf

Grandmaster
Joined
Aug 3, 2015
Messages
9,890
Reaction score
3,149
How are other schools managing retention in the age of covid? We lost a lot of students and haven't gained any new ones in almost a year which has never happened before. I can't lower our rates any more without it resulting in closing our doors but many of our students are leaving because they can't afford it anymore, a few have left because they don't want to wear a mask and said they will come back when Covid is under control. Since last February we have lost over 50% of our students due to financial reasons or health concerns. Has anyone else run into similar problems? any tips on how to manage this?
Thanks.
P.S. located in USA in the northern Midwest.
Are you doing online training sessions and review? Making students record their training and submit it? If you don't have an online component, then you are going to have a difficult time with retaining students. An online component will allow you to address both financial concerns and health concerns of students. An online component means that your school has a larger reach. The student doesn't have to live in the same area, city, or state as you. This will allow you to tap into more students, which will allow you to lower your cost without losing total profit. This is also a good way to retain existing students. Welcome to "The New World"
 

dvcochran

Grandmaster
Joined
Nov 7, 2017
Messages
6,216
Reaction score
1,852
Location
Southeast U.S.
How are other schools managing retention in the age of covid? We lost a lot of students and haven't gained any new ones in almost a year which has never happened before. I can't lower our rates any more without it resulting in closing our doors but many of our students are leaving because they can't afford it anymore, a few have left because they don't want to wear a mask and said they will come back when Covid is under control. Since last February we have lost over 50% of our students due to financial reasons or health concerns. Has anyone else run into similar problems? any tips on how to manage this?
Thanks.
P.S. located in USA in the northern Midwest.
May I ask what area are you in? I ask to understand the level of business restriction you are in. We have been doing modified classes since last September . No rolling and limited contact. Masks and drinking water sources shut off. Full cleaning between classes.
We have seen growth in adults and families. Kids are holding to slightly down.

Just like before Covid we had supplemental video/online support. It is viable for critique of known subject matter but I do not feel it is good for new students. Nothing worse than learning bad habits from the start.
I think it is important for both sides (teacher & student) to understand online training is a stop gap at best. If not, more and more Brick and mortar schools will shut down and quality will continue to dwindle.
Like many businesses it may be prudent to make a federally backed business loan to get through this. Having an honest and open meeting with your landlord (all overhead sources) is critical. Possibly they will agree to work with you on a intake percentage for a time.
Double down on advertising; expressing safety and workout benefits.
If you are paying yourself (which is good and normal) that may have to end for a time.
How long have you been in business? Use your reputation as much as possible. Many schools I know have modified some classes to outside, weather permitting.
I do not believe contraction is the answer.
 

gpseymour

MT Moderator
Staff member
Supporting Member
Joined
Mar 27, 2012
Messages
25,975
Reaction score
7,653
Location
Hendersonville, NC
How are other schools managing retention in the age of covid? We lost a lot of students and haven't gained any new ones in almost a year which has never happened before. I can't lower our rates any more without it resulting in closing our doors but many of our students are leaving because they can't afford it anymore, a few have left because they don't want to wear a mask and said they will come back when Covid is under control. Since last February we have lost over 50% of our students due to financial reasons or health concerns. Has anyone else run into similar problems? any tips on how to manage this?
Thanks.
P.S. located in USA in the northern Midwest.
Every school I'm familiar with is experiencing a similar problem. It's a realtiy. There are things you can do to help keep students in the habit and maintain the community to some extent (online classes, chat rooms, etc.), but they aren't a substitute for in-person classes. They don't create the same sense of community, and not all students will respond well to them. This unfortunately is part of the reality of where we are today.

One thing I did was switch to supporting exercises that are entirely non-contact. That means solo drills, longer warm-ups, and entire classes focused on kata (which is normally a very small part of what I teach) for a few months.

One thing to start thinking about is how you're going to manage the transition back to normal classes. This won't be a binary swap - we won't suddenly find ourselves in a COVID-free world. It will come gradually. For instance, I'll get back to actual hands-on grappling when everyone attending classes has had a full vaccination (and not before). I'm not accepting new students right now to keep classes small for safety. Once I and whoever is left are all vaccinated, I will accept new students only with proof of vaccination. That policy will stand until COVID ceases to be a health concern, which may be quite a while.

All that said, the dojo I was teaching at is closing. It wasn't ever a money-maker (labor of love for the owner), and has been losing money faster for a year, so she's closing it. Not sure where I'll be teaching next, and will probably only take one student with me. So I'll be starting over again.
 

JowGaWolf

Grandmaster
Joined
Aug 3, 2015
Messages
9,890
Reaction score
3,149
Just like before Covid we had supplemental video/online support. It is viable for critique of known subject matter but I do not feel it is good for new students. Nothing worse than learning bad habits from the start.
This is why martial arts teachers often make bad business managers. While it's true that it's not the idea learning medium, some students may be ok with that. They may prefer "something better than nothing." and in reality as a martial arts school instructor you should let the student determine the value of what you teach you teach. Just be up front about how online training has limitation.

1. not all people want to learn to fight.
2. some people take martial arts for exercise and really don't care if they are perfect with their kata or forms
3. some people find value in learning from a quality instructor, and being accepted as their student even if it's online. Here's an example. What do you think people would do if Bruce Lee was alive and in his prime and he stated that he was going to teach an online class and share his knowledge. Do you really think people would pass up the opportunity to have their video reviewed and personally corrected by Bruce Lee. There would be more to take that opportunity than to reject it.
4. Not everyone who trains in person will be good. Not everyone who trains in online (with interactive instruction between teacher in student). How many times has someone posted a video here asked for review, and we gave it our thoughts. Then think of how that person returned after taking the advice and actually improved.

Again I'm not saying it's the best way to learn. I get it. But when that person improves because of the advice that was given online, then that supports the value of interactive instruction online. If the student wants to learn to fight, then that requires sparring. No way of getting around it. But if someone in London wants to learn something that doesn't exist in their area, then something is better than nothing. So long as they understand the limitations of the instruction. From that the student can then determine if the school is worth paying for online classes.

Martial Arts schools and teachers often shoot themselves in the foot when it comes to business decisions. If you have a martial arts school then you are going to be given 2 choices.
1. Make the business decision that will allow you to keep your school open and income flowing in
2. Don't adapt to the current business environment. Shut your doors, then try to start over when things get better.

That's the business reality. From a personal perspective. Do what you can to keep the students you have and then adapt.

Article from Crazy 88 that produces world class fighters
"Maryland shut down gyms on March 16, 2020. We were able to pivot quickly to online classes for different martial arts styles. The attendance has been consistent, but only a fraction of what we would normally get in our live classes. We also came across some challenges with the online classes. For example, our Tiny Ninjas (3-5 years old) online class is tough to run virtually. Despite the high number of membership freezes, we were fortunate enough to continue paying our full-time employees. Our clients have actually been really awesome; most are choosing to just freeze their memberships rather than outright cancel and the majority are continuing to support us throughout this challenging time (we’ll be providing the shutdown time back at no additional charge)."
source: https://www.moyabrand.com/blog/crazy-88-owner-julius-park-talks-covid19-x-bjj-in-the-state-of-maryland/#

Will it online classes be hard. Yep. Most definitely, unless you can find that secret mix that works. Either way Make the best business decisions and allow customers to determine if they want learn online from you. Don't make that decision for them

Remember "People will buy crap so long as you tell them that's what it is." Be honest and don't promise miracles
 

isshinryuronin

2nd Black Belt
Joined
Feb 28, 2019
Messages
782
Reaction score
604
Location
Las Vegas
Making students record their training and submit it

Good idea. Keep the students proactive and involved.

not feel it is good for new students. Nothing worse than learning bad habits from the start. I think it is important for both sides (teacher & student) to understand online training is a stop gap at best

Agree.

They don't create the same sense of community

I feel this is one of the most important elements to foster in a dojo. It develops a sense of belonging, so important, especially for school age students. They should see the dojo as their "gang" and their "go to" place, a home away from home. Not easy to develop as some skills are needed to build this, but worth the effort.

meeting with your landlord (all overhead sources) is critical. Possibly they will agree to work with you on a intake percentage for a time.

How about barter? Offer them, their family members or friends free lessons.
 

gpseymour

MT Moderator
Staff member
Supporting Member
Joined
Mar 27, 2012
Messages
25,975
Reaction score
7,653
Location
Hendersonville, NC
I feel this is one of the most important elements to foster in a dojo. It develops a sense of belonging, so important, especially for school age students. They should see the dojo as their "gang" and their "go to" place, a home away from home. Not easy to develop as some skills are needed to build this, but worth the effort.
To be clear, in-person classes don’t do this automatically. The atmosphere in the school and events outside classes matter a lot. I only had a few training partners I felt like this about.
 

Buka

Sr. Grandmaster
MT Mentor
Joined
Jun 27, 2011
Messages
11,224
Reaction score
7,535
Location
Maui
I feel this is one of the most important elements to foster in a dojo. It develops a sense of belonging, so important, especially for school age students. They should see the dojo as their "gang" and their "go to" place, a home away from home. Not easy to develop as some skills are needed to build this, but worth the effort.

Solid gold, right there.

As for retaining students during this most unusual, crazy time, I've been in touch with a handful of dojo owners over the last ten months. Unfortunately, every single one of their experiences have been completely different, both in their numbers and in what their specific locale has dictated by the officials who preside over their area.

There's a great deal of frustration among dojo owners right now. I wish there were answers, but again, every case is different. So different.

He heart and prayers go out to every student, every teacher/trainer/coach,Sensei etc. And especially to all that run or own a dojo.

One thing might be for sure. There's probably/hopefully never going to be a more trying time than what we're experiencing right now.

May everyone have the luck, patience and resources to keep going.
 

JowGaWolf

Grandmaster
Joined
Aug 3, 2015
Messages
9,890
Reaction score
3,149
May everyone have the luck, patience and resources to keep going.
As bad as it is, business will always find a way. I don't worry about it as much because I know that everyone is experiencing the same thing. It puts everyone in the same operating environment, some things will work and some won't. People will have to change.

A lot of home fitness equipment is going online interactive and that's probably here to stay. You'll have those who can train at home get the job done and move to the next thing. Then you have those who need to be around others. You'll see those people again when there is better control of Covid-19 and the different strains. Small restaurants will survive and many of them will start implementing an online order /pickup and delivery function. Same with stores. Walmart is ahead of that game even before Covid-19.

The biggest issue that I'm worried about is where people train. For me it's all about how much money do my customers have and do they have enough disposable money to pay for my service. The pandemic took out a lot of jobs so people don't have money like they used to. This is going to be the biggest challenge.
 

dvcochran

Grandmaster
Joined
Nov 7, 2017
Messages
6,216
Reaction score
1,852
Location
Southeast U.S.
This is why martial arts teachers often make bad business managers. While it's true that it's not the idea learning medium, some students may be ok with that. They may prefer "something better than nothing." and in reality as a martial arts school instructor you should let the student determine the value of what you teach you teach. Just be up front about how online training has limitation.

1. not all people want to learn to fight.
2. some people take martial arts for exercise and really don't care if they are perfect with their kata or forms
3. some people find value in learning from a quality instructor, and being accepted as their student even if it's online. Here's an example. What do you think people would do if Bruce Lee was alive and in his prime and he stated that he was going to teach an online class and share his knowledge. Do you really think people would pass up the opportunity to have their video reviewed and personally corrected by Bruce Lee. There would be more to take that opportunity than to reject it.
4. Not everyone who trains in person will be good. Not everyone who trains in online (with interactive instruction between teacher in student). How many times has someone posted a video here asked for review, and we gave it our thoughts. Then think of how that person returned after taking the advice and actually improved.

Again I'm not saying it's the best way to learn. I get it. But when that person improves because of the advice that was given online, then that supports the value of interactive instruction online. If the student wants to learn to fight, then that requires sparring. No way of getting around it. But if someone in London wants to learn something that doesn't exist in their area, then something is better than nothing. So long as they understand the limitations of the instruction. From that the student can then determine if the school is worth paying for online classes.

Martial Arts schools and teachers often shoot themselves in the foot when it comes to business decisions. If you have a martial arts school then you are going to be given 2 choices.
1. Make the business decision that will allow you to keep your school open and income flowing in
2. Don't adapt to the current business environment. Shut your doors, then try to start over when things get better.

That's the business reality. From a personal perspective. Do what you can to keep the students you have and then adapt.

Article from Crazy 88 that produces world class fighters
"Maryland shut down gyms on March 16, 2020. We were able to pivot quickly to online classes for different martial arts styles. The attendance has been consistent, but only a fraction of what we would normally get in our live classes. We also came across some challenges with the online classes. For example, our Tiny Ninjas (3-5 years old) online class is tough to run virtually. Despite the high number of membership freezes, we were fortunate enough to continue paying our full-time employees. Our clients have actually been really awesome; most are choosing to just freeze their memberships rather than outright cancel and the majority are continuing to support us throughout this challenging time (we’ll be providing the shutdown time back at no additional charge)."
source: https://www.moyabrand.com/blog/crazy-88-owner-julius-park-talks-covid19-x-bjj-in-the-state-of-maryland/#

Will it online classes be hard. Yep. Most definitely, unless you can find that secret mix that works. Either way Make the best business decisions and allow customers to determine if they want learn online from you. Don't make that decision for them

Remember "People will buy crap so long as you tell them that's what it is." Be honest and don't promise miracles
Since this was in response to my post I will just say I disagree with some but not all you have said. Particularly the “something is better than nothing” comment. This has caused so much grief for martial arts at large. It is very disappointing to hear a fellow school owner state this frame of mind.
 

Danny T

Senior Master
Joined
Sep 5, 2002
Messages
4,258
Reaction score
2,288
Location
New Iberia, Louisiana USA
There are a lot of components to consider. As where you are located and the culture toward training at this time and the challenges of covid. I closed for the original 2 weeks last year in the guise of "lowering the curve". Started training again and have been doing regular classes since. I am fortunate in that presently all of my classes are full and I have a waiting list for new members. I also do 2 virtual classes a week. Am doing a Pekiti-Tirsia Camp this weekend.
 

JowGaWolf

Grandmaster
Joined
Aug 3, 2015
Messages
9,890
Reaction score
3,149
Since this was in response to my post I will just say I disagree with some but not all you have said. Particularly the “something is better than nothing” comment. This has caused so much grief for martial arts at large. It is very disappointing to hear a fellow school owner state this frame of mind.
"Something is better than nothing" and how it's applied
  • If you are a student who takes martial arts only for health, then something is better than nothing
  • If you are a student who takes a martial arts in order to learn a form but really aren't interested in fighting, then something is better than nothing.
  • There are people who have in person training that suck at form even though they show up in person. Are you going to kick them out of your school because they suck and only come once a week? Of course not because some money is better than no money, because no money means your school closes. You lose and your students lose.
  • If you are a student who in interested in taking a martial arts once the pandemic is over, then "some interaction with your school is better than no interaction with your school" So I'm willing to build relationships with people who are interested enough to learn martial arts online in hopes that they will enjoy the only teaching (although limited) that they will choose the same martial arts system when Covid is under control. They don't have to guess what they want to take because they have already had some interaction with the system I train, which some familiarity with a system is better than no familiarity when trying to pick a system to train in.
  • If you want to market your school, your ability, your system. Then online classes during a pandemic and large job loss is a good and inexpensive way to market what you do. Because preparation now for when in-person training can resume is better now than trying to play catch up for when that time comes. At least now you can start grooming potential in person students. Some preparation now is better than no preparation at all.
The only 2 things I can think of where 'Some is better than none is with kids" Especially if your the parents use your school to give themselves a break from the kids. Online classes won't cut it, because it doesn't accomplish the goal that the parent has which is to get a break from their child.

The other thing where "Some is better than none " doesn't apply is with fighting. There's only one way to learn how to fight and that's through sparring. There's no virtual way to develop those skills.

So train people as far as you can until they can take advantage of in person training. Some water is better than no water. Some training is better than no training. The only thing the school needs to be up front with is that there is a limit on how much they will be able to learn. Be honest about that and they will be happy with you and your honesty.

It's real simple. As a business if you don't adapt then your school won't make it through Covid or any other challenge. But it's your choice. You'll get to decide if "Some students is better than No Students"
 

dvcochran

Grandmaster
Joined
Nov 7, 2017
Messages
6,216
Reaction score
1,852
Location
Southeast U.S.
"Something is better than nothing" and how it's applied
  • If you are a student who takes martial arts only for health, then something is better than nothing
  • If you are a student who takes a martial arts in order to learn a form but really aren't interested in fighting, then something is better than nothing.
  • There are people who have in person training that suck at form even though they show up in person. Are you going to kick them out of your school because they suck and only come once a week? Of course not because some money is better than no money, because no money means your school closes. You lose and your students lose.
  • If you are a student who in interested in taking a martial arts once the pandemic is over, then "some interaction with your school is better than no interaction with your school" So I'm willing to build relationships with people who are interested enough to learn martial arts online in hopes that they will enjoy the only teaching (although limited) that they will choose the same martial arts system when Covid is under control. They don't have to guess what they want to take because they have already had some interaction with the system I train, which some familiarity with a system is better than no familiarity when trying to pick a system to train in.
  • If you want to market your school, your ability, your system. Then online classes during a pandemic and large job loss is a good and inexpensive way to market what you do. Because preparation now for when in-person training can resume is better now than trying to play catch up for when that time comes. At least now you can start grooming potential in person students. Some preparation now is better than no preparation at all.
The only 2 things I can think of where 'Some is better than none is with kids" Especially if your the parents use your school to give themselves a break from the kids. Online classes won't cut it, because it doesn't accomplish the goal that the parent has which is to get a break from their child.

The other thing where "Some is better than none " doesn't apply is with fighting. There's only one way to learn how to fight and that's through sparring. There's no virtual way to develop those skills.

So train people as far as you can until they can take advantage of in person training. Some water is better than no water. Some training is better than no training. The only thing the school needs to be up front with is that there is a limit on how much they will be able to learn. Be honest about that and they will be happy with you and your honesty.

It's real simple. As a business if you don't adapt then your school won't make it through Covid or any other challenge. But it's your choice. You'll get to decide if "Some students is better than No Students"

You seem to be coming off as a business expert even though you have yet to offer any concrete, viable advise to the OP.
Context is everything in business, especially a service business that should be as transparent as possible. What you are saying in bold is true but completely out of context in any way remotely productive or effective. It sounds more like the little kid in gym class who does what is required but hates it the whole time so he sucks at it. That is Not better than nothing.

By in large, there are three types of people who take martial arts; people who have done the research and really want to learn a craft, people who think "this will be fun", and people who see it as a good form of exercise. Of course there are other motives (such as kids being dropped off but this overlaps into exercise) but theses are the big ones.
In the gross format of classes there are no adjustments made to accommodate any one category. In other words, everyone does the same material. Even our disabled people are held to this standard. However, a good instructor is going to know how/when to adjust their 'push' for a person or adjust things from each subset. This is the Instructors job, not the students. Martial arts training is Not vanilla across the board. Else it would only produce lemmings and would have died out a long time ago.

And then you contradict yourself by acknowledge that vital aspects of training cannot be done virtually. So at that point you can not promoting MA's training virtually but instead promoting an aerobics class or exercise program. This make you come off sounding like a vacuum cleaner or con artist salesman rather than a quality, committed martial arts instructor.

At least in TN, we have had to fight hard to keep our MA businesses recognized as an avenue of higher learning, like a business school or college. It alleviates certain tax structures paid by and charged by the business. Crap like you are pushing will escort the privilege and honor of things like this right out the door.

FWIW, our 2020 financials were very off the 3 months, then gradually recovered back to normal; better than the norm in certain categories and have continued to trend this way.
Like I said, I understand some of it is predicated on what a schools local and state restrictions are. We are very fortunate that we never had a state mask mandate but have always followed local and federal requirements.

I hope the OP gets back to this thread and updates on where they are and what they are doing. Then we can all give better advise or suggestions.
 

dvcochran

Grandmaster
Joined
Nov 7, 2017
Messages
6,216
Reaction score
1,852
Location
Southeast U.S.
There are a lot of components to consider. As where you are located and the culture toward training at this time and the challenges of covid. I closed for the original 2 weeks last year in the guise of "lowering the curve". Started training again and have been doing regular classes since. I am fortunate in that presently all of my classes are full and I have a waiting list for new members. I also do 2 virtual classes a week. Am doing a Pekiti-Tirsia Camp this weekend.
Danny, do you just set up a camera and Zoom the classes or are they interactive?
 

JowGaWolf

Grandmaster
Joined
Aug 3, 2015
Messages
9,890
Reaction score
3,149
You seem to be coming off as a business expert even though you have yet to offer any concrete, viable advise to the OP.
Context is everything in business, especially a service business that should be as transparent as possible. What you are saying in bold is true but completely out of context in any way remotely productive or effective. It sounds more like the little kid in gym class who does what is required but hates it the whole time so he sucks at it. That is Not better than nothing.

By in large, there are three types of people who take martial arts; people who have done the research and really want to learn a craft, people who think "this will be fun", and people who see it as a good form of exercise. Of course there are other motives (such as kids being dropped off but this overlaps into exercise) but theses are the big ones.
In the gross format of classes there are no adjustments made to accommodate any one category. In other words, everyone does the same material. Even our disabled people are held to this standard. However, a good instructor is going to know how/when to adjust their 'push' for a person or adjust things from each subset. This is the Instructors job, not the students. Martial arts training is Not vanilla across the board. Else it would only produce lemmings and would have died out a long time ago.

And then you contradict yourself by acknowledge that vital aspects of training cannot be done virtually. So at that point you can not promoting MA's training virtually but instead promoting an aerobics class or exercise program. This make you come off sounding like a vacuum cleaner or con artist salesman rather than a quality, committed martial arts instructor.

At least in TN, we have had to fight hard to keep our MA businesses recognized as an avenue of higher learning, like a business school or college. It alleviates certain tax structures paid by and charged by the business. Crap like you are pushing will escort the privilege and honor of things like this right out the door.

FWIW, our 2020 financials were very off the 3 months, then gradually recovered back to normal; better than the norm in certain categories and have continued to trend this way.
Like I said, I understand some of it is predicated on what a schools local and state restrictions are. We are very fortunate that we never had a state mask mandate but have always followed local and federal requirements.

I hope the OP gets back to this thread and updates on where they are and what they are doing. Then we can all give better advise or suggestions.
I didn't contradict myself. I was specific. That learning how to fight can't be done virtually. Training martial arts has 2 main components. Learning the Techniques and applying the techniques. With striking on can learn numerous techniques without a partner. But with learning to apply techniques you need to spar. But the current environment doesn't allow sparring safely. So until then you just train technique.
 

JowGaWolf

Grandmaster
Joined
Aug 3, 2015
Messages
9,890
Reaction score
3,149
You seem to be coming off as a business expert even though you have yet to offer any concrete, viable advise to the OP.
Context is everything in business, especially a service business that should be as transparent as possible. What you are saying in bold is true but completely out of context in any way remotely productive or effective. It sounds more like the little kid in gym class who does what is required but hates it the whole time so he sucks at it. That is Not better than nothing.

By in large, there are three types of people who take martial arts; people who have done the research and really want to learn a craft, people who think "this will be fun", and people who see it as a good form of exercise. Of course there are other motives (such as kids being dropped off but this overlaps into exercise) but theses are the big ones.
In the gross format of classes there are no adjustments made to accommodate any one category. In other words, everyone does the same material. Even our disabled people are held to this standard. However, a good instructor is going to know how/when to adjust their 'push' for a person or adjust things from each subset. This is the Instructors job, not the students. Martial arts training is Not vanilla across the board. Else it would only produce lemmings and would have died out a long time ago.

And then you contradict yourself by acknowledge that vital aspects of training cannot be done virtually. So at that point you can not promoting MA's training virtually but instead promoting an aerobics class or exercise program. This make you come off sounding like a vacuum cleaner or con artist salesman rather than a quality, committed martial arts instructor.

At least in TN, we have had to fight hard to keep our MA businesses recognized as an avenue of higher learning, like a business school or college. It alleviates certain tax structures paid by and charged by the business. Crap like you are pushing will escort the privilege and honor of things like this right out the door.

FWIW, our 2020 financials were very off the 3 months, then gradually recovered back to normal; better than the norm in certain categories and have continued to trend this way.
Like I said, I understand some of it is predicated on what a schools local and state restrictions are. We are very fortunate that we never had a state mask mandate but have always followed local and federal requirements.

I hope the OP gets back to this thread and updates on where they are and what they are doing. Then we can all give better advise or suggestions.
If you include cardio drills with kicks and punches then you are training technique and building cardio. Is that not exercise?

If you train strength building and conditioning so that the techniques will be stronger, then isn't that exercise? Do you need to learn how to fight to do these things? NO. Do you need sparring for these things? NO? Can you learn the things virtually? Yes.

Can you learn how to fight virtually? NO. Learning martial techniques is not the same as learning how to fight with the techniques.
 

JowGaWolf

Grandmaster
Joined
Aug 3, 2015
Messages
9,890
Reaction score
3,149
You seem to be coming off as a business expert even though you have yet to offer any concrete, viable advise to the OP.
My experience in terms of business is that I went to school for it, studied marketing and economics. I then applied it in the real world by doing accomplishing tasks and goals that other business professionals had a hard time doing. I created and marketed youth programs and education programs for the largested County in Georgia. When I was teaching martial arts my main responsibility was to teach students how to fight using kung fu. I also was responsible for the school finances, marketing, community out reach, and website design. I helped take the school from 3 students to 20 students and I didn't spend a dime to do it. School made enough to support itself. I also design websites for small business and have been able to get them top 10 search results as long as they followed the plan that was created for them.....I may not be the top business person but I know how to get people in the door.
 

Flying Crane

Sr. Grandmaster
Joined
Sep 21, 2005
Messages
13,514
Reaction score
2,940
Location
San Francisco
To be clear, in-person classes don’t do this automatically. The atmosphere in the school and events outside classes matter a lot. I only had a few training partners I felt like this about.
I’ve definitely belonged to some schools that had a strong community feeling, but even with those I ended with very few long lasting and close friendships.

As a teenager in my first school, it was small and very few students. I had one friend who trained with me in the school briefly, otherwise I did not have close friendships with the other students. I guess I’ve always been kind of a non-joiner, a bit of a lone wolf I guess. That’s just me. But I was there to learn something, and any friendships that grew from it were a bonus.
 

Martial D

Senior Master
Joined
May 18, 2017
Messages
3,246
Reaction score
998
As bad as it is, business will always find a way. I don't worry about it as much because I know that everyone is experiencing the same thing. It puts everyone in the same operating environment, some things will work and some won't. People will have to change.

A lot of home fitness equipment is going online interactive and that's probably here to stay. You'll have those who can train at home get the job done and move to the next thing. Then you have those who need to be around others. You'll see those people again when there is better control of Covid-19 and the different strains. Small restaurants will survive and many of them will start implementing an online order /pickup and delivery function. Same with stores. Walmart is ahead of that game even before Covid-19.

The biggest issue that I'm worried about is where people train. For me it's all about how much money do my customers have and do they have enough disposable money to pay for my service. The pandemic took out a lot of jobs so people don't have money like they used to. This is going to be the biggest challenge.
With all due respect, online martial arts training is pretty worthless. Unless the student and teacher are both streaming at 100+ fps you won't see any subtleties. At that point you might as well try to learn from youtube.
 

gpseymour

MT Moderator
Staff member
Supporting Member
Joined
Mar 27, 2012
Messages
25,975
Reaction score
7,653
Location
Hendersonville, NC
With all due respect, online martial arts training is pretty worthless. Unless the student and teacher are both streaming at 100+ fps you won't see any subtleties. At that point you might as well try to learn from youtube.
I think there’s more value than that in some situations. Certainly where there’s some experience for the student, there’s room for input, and 100 FPS isn’t necessary unless you’re trying to view full-speed movement.
 

Latest Discussions

Top