Kami Dana

tshadowchaser

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How many of you have one of these small shrines in your dojo.
I know many of the schools that teach sword techniques still have them but I was wondering if other schools do also.
 
M

Mike Clarke

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I believe this thread may have been lost when the internet ninja struck a few weeks back?

Anyway, as I was saying then, I see no reason to have a shrine in the dojo unless there is a belief in the spiritual system the shrine is pointing to.

To have one there just for decoration is the same as using religious icons from other faiths just for show. Besides which it is disrespectful to those who believe in Shinto to be using their faith as some kind of 'cool' looking accessary in the dojo.

This is not what budo is about at all.

Regards,
Mike.
 

arnisador

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Yeah, much was lost in the crash unfortunately--some great stuff in some threads.

I see these fairly often. I don't disagree about the propriety, but I see it fairly often.
 

old_sempai

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I've often observed many MA students confuse these two types of shrines. Here is what I've put in my notes, including added information gleaned sometime ago, perhaps from this forum.

"Kami dama:

The Shinto family altar where the family ancestors are venerated, as opposed to the Butsudan or Butsudana, which is the Buddhist family altar. The following information should be remembered for those that wish to set up a Kamidana in their home.

The shrine should be facing either Eastwards or Southwards.
Do not touch the mirror.
Wash hands and rinse mouth before touching any sacred item.
Do not breath upon the sacred item.
Do not blow out candles or incense.
The water in the tree branch vases and the water in the coned cup should be changed everyday.
Tree branches, salt and rice should be changed on the 1st and 15th of each month.
The doors on the front of the shrine are allways kept closed, unless a priest conducts a special ritual.
Prayers are normally opened standing, then executing two deep bows, two claps and one last bow.
When prayers are finished repeat the same.

Kamiza:

The High Seat, the area of the Dojo where the Spirits [Mitana] of the Deities [Kami] are enshrined. Everyone entering or leaving the Dojo or mat area is required to bow to the Kamiza. The Kamiza is normally placed on a north or east wall, and should never be located above a doorway or window, nor adorned with any weapons whatsoever!


I've been in a number of Dojo's where the Kamiza is festooned with weapons, located over a doorway, and positioned on the "wrong" wall.

Guess these schools were more worried about aesthetics, but still it reveals a great deal about the school, its founder and instructor!
 
R

RyuShiKan

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Originally posted by old_sempai
I've often observed many MA students confuse these two types of shrines. Here is what I've put in my notes, including added information gleaned sometime ago, perhaps from this forum.

Actually the Kamiza is not a shrine but a location either in the dojo (which is rather rare these days) or in a house.

Originally posted by old_sempai
The shrine should be facing either Eastwards or Southwards.

Most of the time but not always. It depends on the dojos layout and wheter it is possible.
But best case scenario is Eastwards or Southwards.


Originally posted by old_sempai

I've been in a number of Dojo's where the Kamiza is festooned with weapons, located over a doorway, and positioned on the "wrong" wall.
Guess these schools were more worried about aesthetics, but still it reveals a great deal about the school, its founder and instructor!

Yeah I have seen that too.but the dojos were all located in Japan..and they are pretty well respected dojos too.
 

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