I've hit a wall and I need advice.

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TheDonster

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I have no idea what that person is talking about...on the odd chance he meant sanchin... you're talking karate to a bujinkan practitioner...he probably doesn't know what that is.

I'm no authority on Japanese martial art history or anything as such. When I first started training 3 years ago before I took my break, one of the instructors went through the motion I described above, telling us to practise it making sure you keep your head at the same height. I am fairly certain he described it as being, or being part of san-shin movement or something.

Back to the topic... I know you have heard this a lot, but the fix is to do it over and over until it becomes natural. When you hit a wall, there are a few things that can inspire and a few things that can disappoint.
I agree. Sometimes it also helps to hear people's advice and encouragement that you are making progress, even if you know that hitting a wall is a sign of improvement...

You think you have spent a lot of time, but in the grand scheme you're still in the beginning stages. The first degree black belt in Japanese is "Shodan". This means first level. So, you see, everything between now and when you are finally ready for your black belt (you will know undoubtedly know when you are ready) is simply laying the foundation for you to reach the first level...not mastery.

I have heard that before, and I completely agree. I've always seen the Kyu grades (since this was explained to me) as the time when you learn the basics. Once you reach Shodan, that's when you start developing and refining your skill - beyond simply having achieved a good foundation. The fact that there's 15 Dan grades in the Bujinkan system and only 9 Kyu grades suggests such a thing!
 

Cryozombie

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I am not qualified to "Teach" you Sanshin, but, let me clarify for you...

Sanshin is one of the MOST BASIC sets of techniques in the Bujinkan, and some of the first things you SHOULD have learned, So of course I made the assumption you KNEW WHAT THEY WERE ALREADY... and were just confused about the TERM.

*edit* Sorry... I will remove the comment I made here, there is no reason for it
 
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TheDonster

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Thankyou.

Chances are if it's one of the most basic sets of techniques, then I probably already know what it is without actually knowing the name :). Although I do endeavour to learn the names so I can actually discuss these things more easily.
 

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I don't expect things to be handed to me on a silver platter, but I don't expect people to waste my time either. If he had said "There's more to it than that, but you would need to speak to your teacher about it" then I would have been happy with the response. Instead, he responded simply as "There's more to it than that", implying that I'm an idiot, and not providing any resolution at all.

Without being able to talk to your instructor directly, you HAVE been told that there's more to the kata than simply moving your arms. It's time to take that advice, and look at the kata. I'm not a BBT student -- but I'm pretty confident that the BBT practitioners won't disagree with this advice. If you think you really understand a fundamenal kata or exercise, you probably need to slow down and look at it some more. ESPECIALLY as a beginner. I've been training in my system for more than 20 years; I STILL look at our most basic exercises and drills and forms, and find something new in them. Or maybe I'm just slow...

I do plenty of work on my own. I have asked for small pieces of advice from people I train with, I have observed the things they do and I have spent a lot of my own time (even closing the door at work when it's quiet) trying to work things out. I was simply looking for a bit more information to help me out and complement what I do know.

Sometimes, working alone is the last thing you should be doing. Sometimes, you need a more experienced hand or qualified teacher to help you understand something. Maybe you just need to relax with this issue until you can get that personal guidance. But... if you must work alone, and something at what I'll arbitrarily call "Level 3" isn't working, then it's time to go back to the beginning. If number one isn't right, there's no way that number 3 can be right.
 
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TheDonster

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I know what I'm supposed to be doing, I'm looking for ways I can work on that :). I love basics, basics are good. I don't have any problem with working on them :).

I want to work on this stuff alone because I have a 'good idea' of what's meant to be done, how it's all supposed to work. I agree that it's not always the best idea to work alone but I believe in my situation I have a goal, it's just simply I needed some advice on what I should actually be working on to achieve that goal.

I've pretty well got the right idea as to how stuff is to work, eg. my form with my Kihon Happo is all pretty good (just a couple of little bad habits which have been indicated to me and I have all but ridden myself of) and it's simply a matter of me wanting to perfect using my legs to do everything.

I appreciate your advice of course, and I see where you're coming from.
 

Don Roley

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I know what I'm supposed to be doing,

Probably not.

Unless you have mastered the subject, you have to rely on a teacher to tell you what you need to be working on.

If you can't see a teacher until early next year, then you had best just wait until that time. Assuming you know what to do and going your own way is a recipe for running off on the wrong path. Take it from one with experience.
 

jks9199

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Probably not.

Unless you have mastered the subject, you have to rely on a teacher to tell you what you need to be working on.

If you can't see a teacher until early next year, then you had best just wait until that time. Assuming you know what to do and going your own way is a recipe for running off on the wrong path. Take it from one with experience.

It's also a way to really thoroughly grind in a bad habit or incorrect way of doing something.

And it's been my experience, both as teacher and student, that bad habits or wrong ways of doing things take much, much longer to unlearn than they did to learn...

I tell my students that the first secret of success in martial arts is to follow directions. My teacher taught that to me... He told stories of literally breaking out a ruler and measuring a step. I thought he was exagerating for effect... Until the day I found I had to take out a ruler and measure a step. Sometimes, there's a world of difference between a 6-inch step and a 7-inch step...
 
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TheDonster

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Hmmm, someone left negative reputation for me. Not only did they not leave their name, but they also show they have obviously not read the entire topic. Good on you, I hope you feel big. I don't care about rep, by the way, so feel free to leave as much negative rep as you want :).
 
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TheDonster

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It's also a way to really thoroughly grind in a bad habit or incorrect way of doing something.

And it's been my experience, both as teacher and student, that bad habits or wrong ways of doing things take much, much longer to unlearn than they did to learn...

I tell my students that the first secret of success in martial arts is to follow directions. My teacher taught that to me... He told stories of literally breaking out a ruler and measuring a step. I thought he was exagerating for effect... Until the day I found I had to take out a ruler and measure a step. Sometimes, there's a world of difference between a 6-inch step and a 7-inch step...


I can relate to the first bit, that's how I was practising Kihon Happo after my 2 year break... It took a bit of hammering over the last year to get me doing things more properly!

Your second point is interesting, although I'm pretty sure that I have been following directions as much as I possibly can!
 

jks9199

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I can relate to the first bit, that's how I was practising Kihon Happo after my 2 year break... It took a bit of hammering over the last year to get me doing things more properly!

Your second point is interesting, although I'm pretty sure that I have been following directions as much as I possibly can!

You've been "following directions as much as <you> possibly can"?

And you're still having trouble...

Then, there's one of two problems. Either, you didn't understand the directions properly, or "as much as you can" isn't the same as "following directions exactly." There's a reason that I broke out a ruler and measured 6 inches for an extended step; 7 didn't work, and neither did 5. But 6 did.

I've found that anytime that something I've been taught SHOULD work fails to... I failed to do it the way it was taught.

Learning to listen and observe are vitally important skills in learning any martial art.
 
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TheDonster

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I've found that anytime that something I've been taught SHOULD work fails to... I failed to do it the way it was taught.

Learning to listen and observe are vitally important skills in learning any martial art.


:) I know... The biggest problem I've had is mainly that I don't use my legs enough and I try to muscle people, although I'm sure there are sometimes little things (such as the wrong angle or target) that prevent me succeeding. I am trying to take in as much advice as I can though, I'm not dismissing anything because I am sure that all guys have more experience at this than I do and I am very eager to get things right.

Ironically, my legs have decided they've had enough exercise lately so I have been unable to work on my Kihon Happo.
 

Don Roley

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Ironically, my legs have decided they've had enough exercise lately so I have been unable to work on my Kihon Happo.

Been there, done that. :cheers:

Maybe you can get a book on stretching and work on that until your up and about again.
 
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