Intellectual Departure

kenpo3631

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Most Kenpo students learn this technique by sliding the left foot back and immediately drawing to the reverse cat. What basic Kenpo rule would this break?

Is the opponents right foot being pushed or pulled by your blocking hand?

What other Beginner Kenpo technique does this blocking motion directly relate to?

:asian:
 

jfarnsworth

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Originally posted by kenpo3631

Most Kenpo students learn this technique by sliding the left foot back and immediately drawing to the reverse cat. What basic Kenpo rule would this break?

Turning your back towards your opponent.

Is the opponents right foot being pushed or pulled by your blocking hand?

My opinion is that it is a pulling motion. Moving backward with the inside downward palm down block and them moving forward how could you push the block?

What other Beginner Kenpo technique does this blocking motion directly relate to?

Opposite angle with deflecting hammer.

Jason Farnsworth
 

Klondike93

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I always thought it just redirected the kick to open the centerline up for the kick. Hmmm, to try and extend the leg you would have to hook it with your block, hmmmm (must experiment now to see how this works ;) )



:asian:
 

jfarnsworth

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I've always stepped my left foot to 5 or 5:30 something close to that. Your back kick strikes before their foot hits the ground.
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AvPKenpo

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Originally posted by kenpo3631

Most Kenpo students learn this technique by sliding the left foot back and immediately drawing to the reverse cat. What basic Kenpo rule would this break?

Is the opponents right foot being pushed or pulled by your blocking hand?

What other Beginner Kenpo technique does this blocking motion directly relate to?

:asian:

Question #1----Point of Origin.
Question #2----Neither
Question #3----Deflecting the Kick
Michael
 

Klondike93

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Intellectual Departure - Defense for a right front thrust kick


1. Step back with your left foot between 5 and 6 into a modified twist stance and set your base.

2. Pivot into a right reverse close kneel with a right inside downward block, palm down, to the inside of attackers right leg.

3. Deliver a right back kick to attackers groin. Plant your foot toward 1 o'clock and set your base.

4. Unwind into a right neutral bow with a right outward back-knuckle to attackers temple.

5. Drag step forward with a right side snap kick to attackers left knee.

6. Land forward into a right neutral bow with a right outward back-knuckle to attackers temple.

There ya go.

The extra back-knuckle in step 4 was added by my instructor as means of teaching you to get your shoulders squared for the side kick.


:asian:
 

AvPKenpo

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technique with..........? If they happen to land back or take a step forward with their left after you have kicked them in the groin. You could finish with spreading the branch? Or something similar.

Michael
 
H

headkick

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Originally posted by kenpo3631



What other Beginner Kenpo technique does this blocking motion directly relate to?

:asian:

Continue the motion and it is a vertical then extended outward block. Very much like sword of destruction or evading the storm. Just upper case instead of lower case.

I don't believe it pulls at all. It redirects since the block travels to 7:30, not six. It doesn't cancel, either. Just my thoughts.

My instructor put this technique back in because there was no technique at that level using that block when the block is shown in Long 1. We showed it with no real application. Plus, it's cool. Very hard to be an honest attacker in a technique line when you know that heel is coming.

R
 
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Handsword

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I think this is a great technique for a couple of reasons:

Firstly, as stated above, it serves as one of the few technique examples of an inward downward block.

Secondly, from the heel kick onwards, it serves as a great suffix technique to be grafted onto many others (much like Obscure Wing).

And thirdly (I did say "a couple" of reasons, but I'm thinking as I'm typing here), it breaks 'the turning your back' rule in order to make use of it. The attacker sees a turned back (for a split second) only to be blasted in return. I know that the heel kick happens before their kick lands (which means they don't really get the decision to advance), but in a different scenario, one could pretend to turn away from a potential attacker only to return with the technique.

Just my thoughts.

- Slade
 

Michael Billings

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I have a different Intellectual Departure in the ideal phase. After discussing it with Mr. Contatser, I decided to leave the back knuckle strike in, even though it was not part of the original technique. So as you read it, remember to delete #3.

11. INTELLECTUAL DEPARTURE (front- right front thrusting ball kick)

1. With your feet together step back with your left foot toward 4:30 into a right reverse bow stance (to move out of the Line of Attack), while simultaneously executing a right inside downward diagonal block - palm down, against the inside of your opponent's right kicking leg. Your left hand checks at your right shoulder.
2. Without hesitation and while still in your right reverse bow, execute a right upward stiff leg kick to the opponent's groin.
3. As you plant your right foot down to point of origin, execute a right outward back knuckle strike to the opponent's temple, utilizing rotation, body momentum, gravitational marriage, and borrowed force.
4. Immediately drag step shuffle, gauging the appropriate range, and execute a right snapping knife edge kick to the inside of the left knee.


Of note: if you delete the reverse bow and utilize the reverse kneel or cat, you lose the residual torque for the lifting kick. It allows more flexibility for a rear kick instead, but that is not the way I saw it executed, although I do both sparring. This lifting kick from the reverse bow is a sneaky little hard kick to the groin, that does not explode from the ground, until you get tension through the hips that has to be released via the lifting kick.

You can always modify the stance and use a reverse close kneel or cat, or change the kick from lifting to a back kick or rear scoop (depending on range), but the technique as written above, minus the backfist, was what I used to see, and was verified by Mr. Conatser as the correct wording. Take it for what it's worth. It has some other principles and concepts, and utilizing this kick avoids violation of point of origin, economy of motion (which might be why it was done this way), and the technique itself teaches residual torque, stepping off the line of attack, checking, borrowed force, rotation, body momentum, controlling opponent's height-width-depth zones, minimizing angles of entry to your own vulnerable targets etc., etc., etc.

Oos,
-Michael
UKS-Texas
 
K

Kirk

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We do it as you described, Mr Billings .. but after the right outward back knuckle strike, and before the knife edge side kick,
we execute a left heel palm to the jaw.:asian:
 

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