How to get more "agressive"?

izeqb

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Hi fellow chunners...

I've been training wing chun on and off for a couple of years now...

I have this reoccurring problem that always seem to haunt me. I'm not aggressive enough...
I'm not talking about hitting my fellow students or anything like that, no I'm talking about my attitude... I'm way too passive in almost everything we do... Chi-Sau, Lat-sau, Sparring etc.

Very often, my passiveness, results in me being too slow when I finally trying to attack...
It's some kind of a mental block that's holding me back...

And the problem is that when I fail to act, it's difficult to get better...

Hmm.. this is kinda hard to explain, but I'm sure that a lot of you guys must have been in the same situation when you started your wing chun journey...

I need some advice on how to get past this and become more "cocky" & "aggressive" when training...

Please note, this has nothing to do, with me wanting to hurt those I train with... it's just... well.. I feel like my "passiveness" is holding me back from learning and become better...

Hope you guys understands and have some ideas to what I can do :)
 

yak sao

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I would describe your symptoms as needing to develop a fighting spirit.

Some people walk in the door with it, others need to have it developed.
There are so many ways you can work on this.
Even something as simple as doing pushups. Most people quit when they start to get difficult....don't quit....push out 5 more...and then 5 more....and then 5 more.

This mentality works with any exercise. Tell yourself that anyone can quit when it gets hard, but a fighter keeps on going.

Practice your forms and hold the stances until your legs are screaming at you but keep going.

Find a partner you can trust and practce poon sau to exhaustion.
Focus pad work with absolute intent on your punches.
Have your partner throw rapid full power punches at your face (not hitting you of course) and just stand there and don't flinch, don't even blink.
And of course, work up to heavy sparring.
Start out doing a set drill, say VS a specific punch or kick. Start slow and precise and slowly turn up the heat until it's damn near for real.

Remember though to stay relaxed. Mentally as well as physically.
Oh as as for the "cocky and aggresive " thing? Lose that idea, instead think "self assured" and "assertive".
 
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izeqb

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I would describe your symptoms as needing to develop a fighting spirit.

Some people walk in the door with it, others need to have it developed.
There are so many ways you can work on this.
Even something as simple as doing pushups. Most people quit when they start to get difficult....don't quit....push out 5 more...and then 5 more....and then 5 more.

This mentality works with any exercise. Tell yourself that anyone can quit when it gets hard, but a fighter keeps on going.

Practice your forms and hold the stances until your legs are screaming at you but keep going.

Find a partner you can trust and practce poon sau to exhaustion.
Focus pad work with absolute intent on your punches.
Have your partner throw rapid full power punches at your face (not hitting you of course) and just stand there and don't flinch, don't even blink.
And of course, work up to heavy sparring.
Start out doing a set drill, say VS a specific punch or kick. Start slow and precise and slowly turn up the heat until it's damn near for real.

Remember though to stay relaxed. Mentally as well as physically.
Oh as as for the "cocky and aggresive " thing? Lose that idea, instead think "self assured" and "assertive".

Exactly... Fighting Spirit. Just the word I was looking for :)

I guess you're right about the not-quitting thing...
Definitely something I'll try out :)

Thanks...

I'm not sure it'll help me when sparring, chi-sau and lat-sau... But I guess I'll find out :)
 

Ironcrane

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I think what you need to do is take your training more seriously. Take a deep breath, settle yourself in, and focus on the task at hand.
 

KamonGuy2

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Izeqb,

I know exactly what you mean brother
The best analogy on a practical level is 'rabbit in headlights' syndrome, where you fail to act, because you dont want to hurt them or because something deep inside doesnt let you act

The best way of getting over this is sparring. Throwing yourself up against an opponent where you have no choice but to act. Wing chun 'sparring' is no good for this as you arent really getting pressure tested (ie the strikes that come in are usually done in a way that you dont feel threatened)

Glove up, get in, and good luck
 
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izeqb

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Izeqb,

I know exactly what you mean brother
The best analogy on a practical level is 'rabbit in headlights' syndrome, where you fail to act, because you dont want to hurt them or because something deep inside doesnt let you act

You are so right. "Rabbit in headlight syndrome", that's it :)

The best way of getting over this is sparring. Throwing yourself up against an opponent where you have no choice but to act. Wing chun 'sparring' is no good for this as you arent really getting pressure tested (ie the strikes that come in are usually done in a way that you dont feel threatened)

Glove up, get in, and good luck

Now when you say that, I reckon that when I'm sparring or doing latsau with someone much better than me, I often "let my self go"...

When you say that Wing Chun sparring isn't good for this, what would be better?

Thanks mate :)
 

mograph

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Isn't it true that we need to get bashed around a bit, first by someone we trust ...? This would show that we can survive a bit of rough treatment in a situation that lets us enter the fighting environment gradually. It helps if the partner is much better than us, and can encourage us to "let go" more and let the fighting spirit bubble up.

But you have to want the fighting spirit. You have to like the fighting spirit. And you're right, it's not about being cocky and aggressive. With the right partner, it becomes invigorating -- a contest between friendly competitors who respect each other.

Imagine the final fight in Jet Li's Fearless, if you will.
 

wtxs

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If all else failed, some good old fashioned locker room steroid will give you all the AGGRESSIVENESS you ever needed. :p:p:p
 

KamonGuy2

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When you say that Wing Chun sparring isn't good for this, what would be better?

Thanks mate :)

Sparring with boxing. It is the best format for gloved training and conditioning. Most boxers have an exceptional frame of mind (ie they know when to switch it on)

Ive been doing a lot of different types of sparring (from various arts), and each has something to offer. However, for your current problem, I would box. It will help
 

matsu

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lets turn this on its head mate....... wen someone trains with you and are "aggressive" in their approach it allows you to feel the moves/techniques and apply them in "real" time yes??
thats what everyone here is saying, i believe........

the by not returning the favour to them you are doing them an injustice, you are not being a great training partner,by not delivering real hard techniques, their training is not getting the full benefit.
i was recently asked to train with a very nervous young kid and i thought i was helping him by talking him thru bits and going easy on him..... oops!! sifu actually told me off for not making him work to his potential, and sure enough his techniques were better when there was a little urgency there, a lil fear of my strike actually getting thru.
so if you cant bring yourself to do it for yourself
think of the guy you are training with.
i have/had this same issue -esp with senior students and i got often hit harder or told off for not helping them get the best from their training.
hope that helps
matsu
 

KamonGuy2

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lets turn this on its head mate....... wen someone trains with you and are "aggressive" in their approach it allows you to feel the moves/techniques and apply them in "real" time yes??
thats what everyone here is saying, i believe........

the by not returning the favour to them you are doing them an injustice, you are not being a great training partner,by not delivering real hard techniques, their training is not getting the full benefit.
i was recently asked to train with a very nervous young kid and i thought i was helping him by talking him thru bits and going easy on him..... oops!! sifu actually told me off for not making him work to his potential, and sure enough his techniques were better when there was a little urgency there, a lil fear of my strike actually getting thru.
so if you cant bring yourself to do it for yourself
think of the guy you are training with.
i have/had this same issue -esp with senior students and i got often hit harder or told off for not helping them get the best from their training.
hope that helps
matsu

This is an excellent point. A lot of schools throw students in at the deep end because after a while your body will do the correct thing. I dont really agree with doing techniques without learning the technique, but in cases of sparring or chi sao etc, it is often good to get a better practitioner getting the hits in - your body will naturally react.

Its like learning to catch a ball. If you do the catch slowly you build up bad habits. If you just train against fast balls coming in, eventually you will learn to deal with them (move out of the way or catch them etc). The same is said of a punch or strike

Matsu is spot on by not giving your training partner 100%. I often get lumbered with students who have the wrong attitude to training (not just in wing chun) and arent focused. It is hard to get a balance between not being too over the top with aggression and too relaxed that you arent offering anything.
 
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izeqb

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lets turn this on its head mate....... wen someone trains with you and are "aggressive" in their approach it allows you to feel the moves/techniques and apply them in "real" time yes??
thats what everyone here is saying, i believe........

the by not returning the favour to them you are doing them an injustice, you are not being a great training partner,by not delivering real hard techniques, their training is not getting the full benefit.
i was recently asked to train with a very nervous young kid and i thought i was helping him by talking him thru bits and going easy on him..... oops!! sifu actually told me off for not making him work to his potential, and sure enough his techniques were better when there was a little urgency there, a lil fear of my strike actually getting thru.
so if you cant bring yourself to do it for yourself
think of the guy you are training with.
i have/had this same issue -esp with senior students and i got often hit harder or told off for not helping them get the best from their training.
hope that helps
matsu

I think you are spot on Matsu...

I've tried to "convince" myself about that the last couple of days and it seems to be working :)

Also, yesterday at training I asked my partners to simply let go and that kinda forced me to react and become more "aggressive" myself...

I've gotten some really good ideas and tips from you guys and I'm really thankful for that.

Also, just keeping in mind that I need to forget about the "shyness" and "embarrassing the other guy", has helped a lot to take advantage whenever there was an advantage or an opening...

Admitted, very often the other guy managed to deal with my attacks and I was the one that ended up being hit ;)

What I'm trying to say here, is that you guys have helped me look very differently on some stuff and I'm sure it'll benefit myself and my fellow sparring partners in the future...

Thanks guys :)
 

matsu

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wow.i helped someone!!woop!
ur more than welcome buddy. i hvae been helped more times than i can mention by the guys on here. so it feels good to contribute when i can.
and by posting on here it often rminds me of stuffi,m forgetting also.
matsu
 

Sukerkin

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Remember though to stay relaxed. Mentally as well as physically.
Oh as as for the "cocky and aggresive " thing? Lose that idea, instead think "self assured" and "assertive".


So, so important, no matter what the art is you study. Being calm and centred, sure of yourself, without being inflammatory is a key part of being a martial artist (or indeed anybody really :)). Finding that balance of broadcasting "I am NOT a victim" along with "But I'm not looking for trouble either" is very difficult.

Fear not, it usually comes with experience, like most things. You have to fail sometimes to learn :D.
 

yak sao

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So, so important, no matter what the art is you study. Being calm and centred, sure of yourself, without being inflammatory is a key part of being a martial artist (or indeed anybody really :)). Finding that balance of broadcasting "I am NOT a victim" along with "But I'm not looking for trouble either" is very difficult.

Fear not, it usually comes with experience, like most things. You have to fail sometimes to learn :D.


You stated that much more eloquently than I did
 

mograph

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Maybe it's a combination of these three:

- "I am not a victim." (if they notice you and consider preying upon you)
- "I'm not a threat to you." (if they notice you and feel defensive, on a hair trigger)
- "I'm not there at all." (where they don't notice you at all)

The last one is hardest (sometimes impossible), but the safest. :D
 

KamonGuy2

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wow.i helped someone!!woop!
ur more than welcome buddy. i hvae been helped more times than i can mention by the guys on here. so it feels good to contribute when i can.
and by posting on here it often rminds me of stuffi,m forgetting also.
matsu

Did you just say 'woop'? Really?

To the corner of the room with you and dont come back until you're a man...
 

zepedawingchun

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Did you just say 'woop'? Really?

To the corner of the room with you and dont come back until you're a man...


Woop Woop Woop Woop Woop Woop Woop Woop Woop, nyuk, nyuk, nyuk, nyuk, nyuk. Oh, a wise guy, eh? (as said from a great kung fu master, posibly a grand master)
 

matsu

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see thats what you get for being surrounded by people much younger than yourselves.... luckily for me their all female... i,m the only male in 18 employees so woooooooohoooooo to that!!
:angel:
:ultracool
matsu
 

zepedawingchun

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see thats what you get for being surrounded by people much younger than yourselves.... luckily for me their all female... i,m the only male in 18 employees so woooooooohoooooo to that!!
:angel:
:ultracool
matsu

Have you learned Venusian yet?
 
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