How can i develop power in my knifehand strike?

Tigerwarrior

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So I'm gonna try to keep this short. I've been breaking boards rebreakable ones at my dojang. Like 2 weeks ago I broke a green one(equivalent to a 1 in pine) I broke it pretty easy with my non dominant hand. So the other day I figured let's try the next difficulty up with my dominant hand same strike just different hand. I couldn't break it tried 3 times, I did break with an elbow but my right knife hand wouldn't break it. Is there any way I can gain some power on this strike at home? I don't have any punching bags or anything but was wondering if yall could give me some advice on this. Thanks.
 

Dirty Dog

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First thing is to find out what kind of rebreakable boards you're using. I think they're a great training tool, but the fact is, some are really good, and some are...not. The defining characteristic of a good one is, in my view, consistency.

Gaining power is just a matter of repetition. You need to perform the technique a bazillion times, with impact.

The other factor in breaks is the holder. If the board moves away when you hit it, it's not going to break. Or it'll be much more difficult to break; a weak holder turns it into a speed break, and those are significantly more difficult.

If you've got a good holder, breaking comes down to technique. If your technique is good, you will break the board. If not, you won't. Our smallest students break 1" pine boards. I'm sure you can too.

Video of you might help, in that it would allow suggestions about specific technique changes you could make.
 

isshinryuronin

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Assuming you don't have any mental block the answer is most likely body motion. If your strike is horizontal, the key is in your hip rotation, concentrating on your elbow moving strongly with your hips. Since your hand is connected, the power will end up on the target. If the strike is vertical, concentrate on dropping your body weight as you strike. Again, the elbow is the connection between your power source and the hand.

Think of hitting with your whole body - the hand is just along for the ride.
 

Earl Weiss

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(Assuming Horizontal Strike) This is easy to show but hard to explain. I feel many set up incorrectly and don't get the most bang for the Buck . Lets say you are going to use your right hand. If the surface you are going to strike is facing south many position themselves to the East. Now the hand is moving more or less in an arc. Now, think about throwing a frisbee. (Type of throw holding frisbee with thumb on top when released .- Not to imply method is exactly the same , just how you move for reference. ) Your hand travels in the direction you want the frisbee to go. So, position yourself with with left foot to the south and right foot in front feet somewhat close together and A. Basic Level) step forward with the right foot as you strike, or B . (Better level) Start a little further back and feet a little wider and with your left foot step behind your right foot to close the distance, and then step with the right as you strike. This step does 2 things: 1. It moves your mass toward the target and 2. It first rotates your hips and shoulders in one direction so they can "Unwind" rotating in the direction of the strike and facilitate power as you step with the right foot. Idea being - to the greatest extend possible line of force should be perpendicular to the target. . I hope that is understandable. . Another possible way to conceptualize would be a Tennis player position for a "Backhand".
 
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Tigerwarrior

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First thing is to find out what kind of rebreakable boards you're using. I think they're a great training tool, but the fact is, some are really good, and some are...not. The defining characteristic of a good one is, in my view, consistency.

Gaining power is just a matter of repetition. You need to perform the technique a bazillion times, with impact.

The other factor in breaks is the holder. If the board moves away when you hit it, it's not going to break. Or it'll be much more difficult to break; a weak holder turns it into a speed break, and those are significantly more difficult.

If you've got a good holder, breaking comes down to technique. If your technique is good, you will break the board. If not, you won't. Our smallest students break 1" pine boards. I'm sure you can too.

Video of you might help, in that it would allow suggestions about specific technique changes you could make.
Thanks for your post @Dirty Dog . I agree with everything you said. I think I know the problem now, I've been drilling the left knife hand strike in one of our forms for about a month. Haven't drilled the right hand on that strike as much. This could just easily be a lack of reps. My technique on the left knifehand my instructor says is solid, now that I think of it I'm probably not using my hips enough on the break that failed with right hand. I'm gonna drill it more with reps. Thanks my friend.
 
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Tigerwarrior

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Assuming you don't have any mental block the answer is most likely body motion. If your strike is horizontal, the key is in your hip rotation, concentrating on your elbow moving strongly with your hips. Since your hand is connected, the power will end up on the target. If the strike is vertical, concentrate on dropping your body weight as you strike. Again, the elbow is the connection between your power source and the hand.

Think of hitting with your whole body - the hand is just along for the ride.
Thanks I'm gonna work on that.
 
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Tigerwarrior

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(Assuming Horizontal Strike) This is easy to show but hard to explain. I feel many set up incorrectly and don't get the most bang for the Buck . Lets say you are going to use your right hand. If the surface you are going to strike is facing south many position themselves to the East. Now the hand is moving more or less in an arc. Now, think about throwing a frisbee. (Type of throw holding frisbee with thumb on top when released .- Not to imply method is exactly the same , just how you move for reference. ) Your hand travels in the direction you want the frisbee to go. So, position yourself with with left foot to the south and right foot in front feet somewhat close together and A. Basic Level) step forward with the right foot as you strike, or B . (Better level) Start a little further back and feet a little wider and with your left foot step behind your right foot to close the distance, and then step with the right as you strike. This step does 2 things: 1. It moves your mass toward the target and 2. It first rotates your hips and shoulders in one direction so they can "Unwind" rotating in the direction of the strike and facilitate power as you step with the right foot. Idea being - to the greatest extend possible line of force should be perpendicular to the target. . I hope that is understandable. . Another possible way to conceptualize would be a Tennis player position for a "Backhand".
Thank you! Good info
 

Dirty Dog

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Git stronger.
Technique is far more important than strength for breaking. I've never been particularly strong, and after more than a decade of chemo, I'm a whole lot less strong. But my personal best is ten 8x16x2" pavers with a hand strike.
 

drop bear

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Technique is far more important than strength for breaking. I've never been particularly strong, and after more than a decade of chemo, I'm a whole lot less strong. But my personal best is ten 8x16x2" pavers with a hand strike.
 

Earl Weiss

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Another way to practice if you have not been doing it already is on a heavy bag.
 

Kung Fu Wang

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but my right knife hand wouldn't break it. Is there any way I can gain some power on this strike at home? I don't have any punching bags or anything but was wondering if yall could give me some advice on this. Thanks.
Square bag filled with BB can be a good training.

iron_palm_training.jpg


Have you ever tried to break concrete blocks without space in between?

my_break.jpg
 
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Tigerwarrior

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Square bag filled with BB can be a good training.

View attachment 30068

Have you ever tried to break concrete blocks without space in between?

View attachment 30069
I've seen those type of bags used in wing chun. Good idea thanks. Fill them with what size bb? And no I've never broke any concrete blocks but I want to one day in the future. But it takes years of conditioning to get to that level I hear.
 

Kung Fu Wang

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Fill them with what size bb?
Those BB used in the BB gun. I have used steel ball bearing before. But BB is cheaper. Shotgun lead is bad (lead poison). IMO, the size is not important.

In the beginning, you may try to use mung bean instead. It's cold in natural. It won't hurt your hand.

mung_bean.jpg
 
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