HELP Terminology Question

Young Warrior

Yellow Belt
Joined
Dec 31, 2009
Messages
31
Reaction score
0
Location
Sugar Land TX
Hi EveryOne,

Recently in my school ( kuk sool Won ) they made terminology as well as common phases a requirement in our testings.
I would like to show my instructors that im trying my best plus get use to responding in korean in class.
Im looking for an free audio or mp3 of yes sir in korean so that i will be able to learn it & start using that in class instead of saying it in english .
Im just asking for help in the common phase area thats all & not in the terminology of the kicks stances or anything like that.
Thanks
 
Last edited:

dancingalone

Grandmaster
Joined
Nov 7, 2007
Messages
5,312
Reaction score
264
You should ask for help specifically from your teachers since you study Kuk Sool Won. I'm aware that KSW has differing terms for some stances for example that are the same in TKD, so it won't necessarily be helpful if someone from another Korean art responds with a resource.

Don't you have access to one of those KSW textbooks? They have the correct names in Korean for each of the stances, strikes, kicks, etc.
 
OP
Young Warrior

Young Warrior

Yellow Belt
Joined
Dec 31, 2009
Messages
31
Reaction score
0
Location
Sugar Land TX
You should ask for help specifically from your teachers since you study Kuk Sool Won. I'm aware that KSW has differing terms for some stances for example that are the same in TKD, so it won't necessarily be helpful if someone from another Korean art responds with a resource.

Don't you have access to one of those KSW textbooks? They have the correct names in Korean for each of the stances, strikes, kicks, etc.

I was just letting them know all of that too.
yes u are right but i need some help on how to say " yes sir " in Korean.
 

MBuzzy

Grandmaster
MTS Alumni
Joined
Aug 15, 2006
Messages
5,328
Reaction score
107
Location
West Melbourne, FL
You may want to look back into some of our old threads. I will see if I can find a few, but we have had many discussions on the use of "yes sir" here. Let me give you a quick run down.

Koreans really don't use the term "yes sir." When dealing with the Korean Language, you have to FIRST understand that it is an Altaic based language, NOT Romanantic or Latin based. Things are completely different. Not every word phrase or idea translates. Plus, the language comes from a VERY different culture.

There is a concept in Korean called "honorific." This is the ending added to a word to add respect to the word. For example...If I am telling someone to sit. I can say "Anjo" "Anjoyo" "Anjoshyipshyo" (those are the common ones). They all mean EXACTLY the same thing - TO US. But to them, they are different. I would say Anjo to someone who is younger or my junior, anjoyo in a polite setting, anjoshyipshyo to someone who was older or my senior. Then if they are MUCH more senior, it would be different. You see, the respect is intrinsic in the language. I like to say that every WORD is quite literally DRIPPING with the respect and acceptance of your relative position to others.

SO, they really don't use the term "sir" and there really isn't an equivalent. Let me put it in more Martial Arts terms.

Let's say that we are talking to a 4th Degree Instructor. If I was his student or junior, I would call him "Sabomnim" but if I was his senior, I would probably just call him "Sabom." IMPORTANT NOTE - THE ENDING "NIM" DOES NOT MEAN OR DIRECTLY TRANSLATE TO "SIR," IT IS AN ENDING DENOTING RESPECT.

In a typical Korean Martial Arts class, where Americans would say "Yes Sir," you will typically just hear "Ne" or "Ye" (both mean "yes" in Korean, "Ne" is more common, pronounced 'Nay'). But if addressing directly, you will sometimes hear "ne, Sabomnim." or something to that effect.
 

rlp271

Orange Belt
Joined
Jul 20, 2010
Messages
82
Reaction score
0
Location
Seoul
MBuzzy is absolutely correct. In Korean, they tend to call people by their title. You rarely hear names used unless the two are co-workers on the same level or have a close relationship with one another. Even among married couples who are old fashioned, they rarely use names. Example: Instead of calling her husband by his given name, a woman might say their child's name and then appa or aboji (father) to call him. So, if they have a son named Wonbin, she would say, "Wonbin appa" to address her husband in front of their kids. So, ask your instructors what titles are appropriate for which ranks. I'm not too familiar with KSW, so I can't comment much. BTW: Neh is considered more polite than Yeh these days, even though I had been told the opposite some time ago.
 

jacktnicol

Yellow Belt
Joined
Jan 1, 2006
Messages
37
Reaction score
1
Location
South Korea (Canadian citizen)
Like when the JKN tells us to get into left stance or when he is done showing us something or when he says to me lu go over or lu do this.

like others have said most of the neh is the correct response. When i ask the context i was looking to see if you wanted the after he done showing somthing. If he says somthing like "do you understand?" or "okay?" after showing somthing the the correct response would be "네, 알겠습니다". which means yes, i understand.
 

Latest Discussions

Top