Terminology in your training?

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Llarion

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We count in Korean, though I'm certain I am saying every number horribly wrong. We call the forms by Korean name, and we call each technique by both English and Korean name. I've been searching for a concise Korean translation guide on the web for the terms and numbers so I can learn them properly, but have not had much success yet. I'll scope the link posted before me!!
 
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progressivetactics

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if you have a written guide from your instructor- Say them the way they are written. The Language is a sounded out the way it is written (if written in english). It is probably Very close.
If not, I invite you to our discussion forum at www.progressivetactics.com

a couple of the masters write/read and speak korean quite well.

bb
 
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Llarion

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Thanks very much! I'll definitely stop by!! I actually got a Korean language learner CD, but haven't yet had time to sit down with it...
 

Pale Rider

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I agree that I beleive that the Korean Terminology should be stressed when teaching the Korean martial arts. The only thing that I have problem with is that not only the English accents vary from State to State, but the pronounciation of the Korean terminology also varies. Therefore my best recommendation is that to understand the terminology both written and spoken, and listen to the different ways that people pronouce the words therefore no matter what you can converse with them.

Also I find that it impresses the Koreans if you can converse with them in their own langauge as most countries believe that American is stereotyped in only speaking one language..

Again this is just my opinion.

(I have a terminology sheet that I am compiling for my students to first understand the Basic Commands and work up to being able to write Hangul... as my tests gets harder and with more Hangul on them.)
 

glad2bhere

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This may go against the prevailing opinions but I do NOT use Korean terminology or often work around the use of the terminology. I teach students whose language is English and who do not experience any special advantage in learning terms which are not wholly consistent across the KMA. FWIW.

Best Wishes,

Bruce
 

DennisBreene

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To carry the discussion even further afield. I have been to several schools that use Korean terminology taught by Americans who themselves learned from Americans. Hence you end up with complete corruption of the pronunciation. My Grand Master trained in multiple styles from Kempo to Korean and happened to be a native Hawiian. He often slipped between Korean, Japanese and the occasional Hawiian phrase while teaching. There was a concerted effort to use proper Korean pronunciation for counting and basic stances, blocks, etc. Japanese words like Gi and Kata were, I think so firmly entrenched in his own background that they slipped in unnoticed. To further add to the unique flavor of his demanding and excellent training, you soon learned that words like "pali" were Hawiian for hurry up. At about my brown belt period, my instructor decided to make a concerted effort to have us learn the Korean for all of the moves in the system. As many of you are aware, the Korean description for something like a reverse outside block with knife hand in a back stance is every bit as complex in Korean as the English phrase I just wrote. Even with written vocabulary and drillling, it was a very difficult transition and frequently when I am studying a new form, I find myself referring to the glossary to determine what the move is supposed to be because I am not that skilled at reading Korean words translated into Roman text. So, while the intention is noble, I believe we have to recognize that the language skills are often spotty and keep our primary focus on the quality of the techniques and the respect for the art as demonstrated in the class structure and behavior.
Dennis
Yes, sir! And, with all due respect, as much as I would like to learn the language associated with my main art...I agree!

It is very frustrating to me because I so want to learn Korean, but no resources in my area provide instruction in conversational Korean...AND...I know that after I test for black (assuming I pass), I will receive my requirements for 2nd dan in Korean. Of course, I'm sure I could pay a translator to do the job for me, but doesn't that make the whole point moot (as you say)???

I may be in a weird minority here but will share this for what it is worth.

In my college classes I use as LITTLE Korean terminology as I can. I don't find that it improves the students understanding or practice and it sometimes actually daunts the student by adding one more level of intellectual material they would need to succeed with.

On the other hand, with my CLUB students and with my PRIVATE students I expect them to pick-up the terms both as a way of recognizing the Korean heritage AND as a way of introducing them to Korean culture (language and ideas) beyond just the practice of martial art.

I do have one criticism of using Korean language though and this creates problems even with my advanced students. It is very difficult to find uniformity in terminolgy (especially in weapons work) and even where there are uniform terms the spelling and pronunciation are not always uniform. Even in the same art, terms can change both in spelling and usage between organizations. Ad to this mis-interpretations and faulty transliterations into English and the matters just get worse. Wish there might be something to address this. FWIW.

Best Wishes,

Bruce
 
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