Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ) on Korean Martial Arts (KMA)

Bob Hubbard

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KOREAN MARTIAL ARTS
Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ) on Korean Martial Arts (KMA)

Version: 1.39 Date: 13 January 2002
Brought to you by the Martial Arts Resource
(http://MartialArtsResource.com) and California Taekwondo, Hapkido and Eskrima
Ray Terry, P.O. Box 110841, Campbell, CA 95011-0841
rterry@MartialArtsResource.com
This FAQ was created to be informative. There are no
intentions for it to be offensive to any style or person.
This FAQ is a compilation of information acquired over the years from
various sources, but it is FAR from complete. Any corrections or additions
that are submitted will be carefully considered. Send them to address
rterry@MartialArtsResource.com
and include "KMA FAQ INFO" as the subject heading.

* =====================================
* TABLE OF CONTENTS
* =====================================
*
* 1 - Introduction
* 2 - What is a martial art?
* 3 - How do I choose a school?
* 4 - Should children study martial arts?
* 5 - Belief systems
* 6 - Rankings/Color belt systems
* 7 - Korean martial arts glossary
* 8 - Bibliography
* 9 - Sources of electronic information
* 10 - Sources of equipment and material
* 11 - Different Korean arts and styles
* 12 - TaeKwonDo Olympic sparring rules
* 13 - Brief History of Korea
* 14 - Korean Martial Arts Organizations
* 15 - The people that made this FAQ possible
*
* =====================================
This is an excellent resource for those seeking mooe information.
(http://MartialArtsResource.com)
 

Cthulhu

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That KMA FAQ may be a wee bit too big :) Okay, I'll just say it: it's friggin' HUGE!

BTW:

:uzi:[My Southeast Asian MA idea]

:D

Cthulhu
 
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Bob Hubbard

Bob Hubbard

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Ok, shortened it way down, and posted link to the maint site, rather than posting full version here.
:asian:
 

arnisador

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I don't think I recognize the Kung Sul that is referred to in the description of this forum; what is it?
 
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Bob Hubbard

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This is the only information I could find on it.



"Kung Sul, the Skill of the Bow Traditional Korean Archery "

"In contrast to Western-style archery, where only the physical technique is taught, Oriental bowmanship involves a higher, spiritual factor. Kung sul was considered in the past to be the way for a cultured man to develop his character to its true potential. "

From http://www.concentric.net/~Sdseong/kmar.vid.ks.htm
 

arnisador

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Originally posted by Kaith Rustaz
"Kung Sul, the Skill of the Bow Traditional Korean Archery "

It's very hard to find information about this on the web! It must be very rare. It seems to appear in several Korean systems however, e.g. Hwa Rang Do.
 

Cthulhu

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Could Kung Sul simply be the Korean equivalent of Kyudo? For some time, Korea has made an effort to eliminate any mention of Japanese influence in their martial arts, which is somewhat understandable, considering the circumstances.

What would be interesting to see is if mention of this system, or one like it, was mentioned in the Mu Yea Do Bo Tong Ji, the 200+ year old Korean text listing and describing several weapons and empty-hand based martial arts of Korea. I know there was somebody attempting to translate this book into English, which would make it a valuable resource to every Korean martial artist and martial arts bibliophile.

Is any KMA practitioner on the board familiar with this text and know whether or not Kung Sul is mentioned within?

Cthulhu
 

arnisador

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Originally posted by Cthulhu
Could Kung Sul simply be the Korean equivalent of Kyudo?

I think that this is the case.


For some time, Korea has made an effort to eliminate any mention of Japanese influence in their martial arts, which is somewhat understandable, considering the circumstances.

Yes, but also somewhat amusing. I think it is changing somewhat also--the influence seems to be acknowledged a little more often these days.
 
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KickingDago

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Kuk Sool Won and Kuk su do are there any difference or theyre both the same style??
 

jkn75

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Kuk SooL Won and Kuk Sool Do are different. From what I know Kuk Sool Do broke off from Kuk Sool Won. Everything that they do seems to be almost exactly like Kuk Sool Won.

Korean Archery is taught in some systems (kuk sool won, hwarang do) but isnt a complete art on its own as far as I know. The Muye Dobo Tongje does not mention archery.
 

arnisador

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Originally posted by jkn75

Kuk SooL Won and Kuk Sool Do are different. From what I know Kuk Sool Do broke off from Kuk Sool Won.

I hadn't heard of this. Is Kuk Sool Do practiced in Korea or was this in the States?
 

jkn75

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I am not sure of the entire history of the split of kuk sool won and kuk sul do but kuk sul do (had spelling wrong, sorry) is found in the us as well as in Korea. here is the kuk sul do website http://yangskuksuldo.com/ which says that there are 30 schools in Korea (look under schools and click on the Korean master). the kuk sool won web site is www.kuksoolwon.com.

if you look at the histories they are very similar as are the uniforms etc. Also the syllabi are very similar, although the belt colors are a little different. (yangs site check "ranks", kuk sool = www.kuksoolwon.com/testreq.htm) there are a lot of similarities but even the kuk sul do site says they have no affiliation with kuk sool won.

they are similar but there are some differences mainly I think to get around kuk sool won's copyright protection they put on everything.

A kuk sul do student may have more enlightenment than I on the subject.
:asian:
 

arnisador

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Thanks, I hadn't known anything about this.

The Kuk Sul Do page also mentions (Korean) Kembo--is this as in Kenpo/Kempo?
 

jkn75

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I did a little research and the only thing I was able to find was this: http://www.coolshack.com/message-board/message/31.html. I tested this link and it didn't work from here but if you do search on yahoo.com of kembo martial arts it comes up. So it does appear to be related.
Maybe if you contact the administrator there, and they may know something. Other than that there's another kuk sul do site at www.kuksuldo.com.

I prefer kuk sool won and I dont mean to promote kuk sul do so much. so here's another plug for the kuk sool won site www.kuksoolwon.com
 
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Hwarang

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Could Kung Sul simply be the Korean equivalent of Kyudo?

Kung Sul has very little in common with Kyudo. For one the Korean bow is only 1/3 the size of the Japanese, but it shoots much longer. The Korean archer is actually ~150 meters away from the target when he shoots...

http://www.koreanarchery.org/ is a very good ressource.

Archery is not included in the Muye Dobo T'ongji - but that does not mean Korean archery is a copy of Japanese Kyudo.
BTW, Turtle Press published an English translation of Muye a while back. The chapter I read seemed to be a translation of a Korean translation rather than of the original text, but it was still very good.

Carsten
 
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