? for all judo people

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tkdguy1982

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What is thing that you enjoy the most about judo & what is the worst thing you don't like & what do you all think could be improved to help out judo?
 
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Mwolfe

Guest
I love the dynamics of Judo. I hate the fact that most schools are teaching "competition only" techniques, and not teaching people the actual art.
 

Aegis

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Exactly my complaint about modern Judo: it's all about the competition, not the self defence.
 
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tkdguy1982

Guest
Yeah I think that would be everyones complaint. If only they would teach both, competition & the actual art.
 
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Mwolfe

Guest
It's exactly why I quit going to my local clubs. I decided to train in another art to get more well-rounded. You won't want to grip fight in a street fight, as there are no grips to really fight for. It's a right hook to the temple, clinch, throw, and submit if necessary.
 
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tkdguy1982

Guest
True.... I agree.... I think I might stick to the TKD for a fight.
 
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Mwolfe

Guest
After a whole lot of information from different arts, I decided to go with Wing Chun. Its close quarters combat, and its ability to quickly close the gap would greatly benefit my Judo training for any situation.

I'll be starting next week.
 
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whackjob-san

Guest
Yeah, the sporting aspect has totally ruined the true spirit of judo. Times have changed, the world is well aware of the benefits of martial arts, I don't believe judo needs to sell itself as a sport any longer to gain interest. I think it should revert back to a more combat/self-defense oriented art, randori should be about 1/4 of a judo class, nothing more than practicing technique against a resisting foe.
 

Brother John

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I'm not a judoka but have a healthy respect for them.
My question: Did Prof. Kano set up judo as a competitive sport or as a martial art, meant for combat application?
Just wondering.
Thanks
Your Brother
John
 
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Kirbo

Guest
Kano's dream realized was Judo becoming an Olympic sport so yes he intended it to be a sport as well as a martial art (and physical education on top of that). "Nothing more than practicing technique against a resisting foe?" That just isn't the essence of judo but of combat itself. Judo is too dynamic to teach as "person does this so you do that." The sporting aspect doesn't ruin the true spirit of judo, it strengthens it. What better way to keep it real without excessive injuries? Combat application is easily made and can be done on the fly. Judo has been dogged for the past few decades as being ineffective but the criticism is unwarranted.
 
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Gaston

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What I enjoy the most about judo is the dynamics of pitting your self mentally & physically against another person, for mutual advancement. For Judo to thrive we must remember its co-operative nature. I also feel the limitation of various techniques has created a dormant state that was never meant to exist. A few changes that I feel would aid Judo are as follows: incorporating a round fighting area, promoting transition techniques, ensuring refs actually still train/attend classes, & revising the rules to allow for dynamic ground work.

GG
 

Shogun

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I dont want to sound like a jerk (I cant stand those people.lol) but Judo was pretty much designed for sport. not to say it isnt an MA, cause it is, but what it is now, is what it was designed for.
 

Ceicei

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Try not to focus just on the competition aspect. Even if your school happens to be competition oriented, there is plenty in judo that can be applicable to self defense when needed. I love the pins, chokes, locks, and throws.

That said, there are some things competition does teach: timing, balance, and the awareness of what your opponent intends to do so that you can circumvent his intention. These are very important skills that are transferable to the street. Now if judo is paired up with another style (ie. cross-training), then there is more in your arsenal of what can be done to defend yourself.

I'm curious. How many judokas practice atemi-waza and Kime-shiki?

- Ceicei
 
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auxprix

Guest
Atemi waza is usually just mimed in demonstration. Striking is not very important to our art, so very little time is spent on it. Some dojos don't teach it at all.

Kime shiki is along the same lines. I've seen some dojos work it with sticks in demonstration. These are the types of dojos that focus on the self defence aspect of Judo. I believe there are katas for this type of exercize as well, but I haven't been exposed to many katas in my practice.
 
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Kevin Walker

Guest
Ceicei said:
Try not to focus just on the competition aspect. Even if your school happens to be competition oriented, there is plenty in judo that can be applicable to self defense when needed. I love the pins, chokes, locks, and throws.

That said, there are some things competition does teach: timing, balance, and the awareness of what your opponent intends to do so that you can circumvent his intention. These are very important skills that are transferable to the street. Now if judo is paired up with another style (ie. cross-training), then there is more in your arsenal of what can be done to defend yourself.

I'm curious. How many judokas practice atemi-waza and Kime-shiki?

- Ceicei
Hi,

Usually, a judo practitioner is not referred to as a 'judoka' until after they achieve Godan (5th degree), and it is usually the Godans who are battling it out for the Gold Medal in the Olympics, World Championships, or the All Japan Judo Championships. After one achieves GODAN rank, they usually retire from active competition and the 6th thru 10th dan ranks are based on what the Judoka contributes to Judo. Anton Geesink, 1964 Gold Medal winner, just last year was awarded the 10th dan (Judan) in Judo.

Now to answer your last question, Judokas tend to learn and concentrate on atemi-waza and kime-shiki after the Godan rank (age 26 and above, assuming one started Judo training at age six like they do in Japan). I started my Judo late in life at age 10!

The higher up in rank you go, the more katas you are required to learn. I had to demonstrate the Nage no kata for my Shodan, and I learned the katame-no-kata for my Nidan test.

In my day, it took an average of ten years to earn your Shodan (1st degree black belt), took me a little longer since I refused it the first time I was offered it, which aggravated my sensei.

So it is with the advanced Judo katas that one will acquire the self-defense techniques of Judo.
 
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Levi

Guest
fun slamming people, not fun getting slammed!
 
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Kevin Walker

Guest
tkdguy1982 said:
What is thing that you enjoy the most about judo & what is the worst thing you don't like & what do you all think could be improved to help out judo?
What I love the most about Judo is simply, Randori! To me that is where all the benefit and character building take place. Dr. Jigoro Kano made Randori 80% of his Judo training repetoire (and other nations have emphasized Shiai (tournament as 80% of the Judo training).

What I dislike most about Judo is Shiai (tournament). I always felt that tournament was just an expensive and miserable experience needed to get over with just to make rank. I never got any benefit out of tournament other than a chance to do Randori against a new partner. All of my dust catching trophies and medals over the past thirty years (and from some Karate shiais too) have been dumped. Can't lug them eveywhere.

I believe that to improve Judo, American's need to start at a young age (6) and then let them decided if they want to participate in Shiai as a teenager. Dr. Jigoro Kano did not develop Judo simply for the winning of trophy's or medals (learn boxing or wrestling or basketball for that).
 
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