FMA vocabulary needed

L

Lunumbra

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I'm looking for a good source to learn some of the vocabulary associated with FMA's

for instance, in my limited experience, Kali, Escrima and Arnis are used almost interchangably as the name of art forms. Are there different emphasis placed on each name?

What is Tippi-Tappi?

If someone could just give a brief description of each common excercise, it would be a great help to all of us beginners in following the posts around here!

Thanks
Michael Stone
 
Some common drills

Sombrada - to shadow, typically middle range counter for counter drill, one person feeds an angle, the other person blocks, checks and counter-strikes, which feeds another angle to the other person, it goes back and forth. I have seen 3 count and 5 count sombrada, if there are others please let me know. Can be done single weapon left or right, long and short, two equal lenth weapons or emtpy hand. I'll try to stay away from numbered angles since they are different depending on system

3 count
Partner 1 feeds a lowline thrust, Partner 2 does a wing block, check, and delivers a backhand strike to the head, 1 does a shield block and delivers a low forhand strike to knee, 2 delivers a low cross block and delivers a lowline thrust, over and over and over.

5 count
Partner 1 feeds a lowline thrust, Partner 2 does a wing block, check, and delivers a backhand strike to the head, 1 does a shield block and delivers an overhead strike, 2 does a roof or umbrella block and a forhand strike to head, 1 does an inside sweep block and a backhand to knee, 2 does a drop stick block and thrusts, back to the beginning but now 2 starts it.

In more advanced stages you can learn were half-bea hits can be inserted, practice disarming, break the pattern, etc.


Hubad Lubad - Tie/untie - close range drill, ummm kinda difficult to explain in words but I'll try! Partner feeds an angle 1, you parry with left hand, as it passes centerline check with right, clear down with left and feed a one back so your partner can do the same. This is the basic flow drill, in more advanced practice the student is encouraged to find where hits (cuts with a knife), wrenches, joint locks, etc can be inserted in flow, as well as breaking in and out of range.

Numerada - by the numbers Depends on the style and teacher, but typically one person feeds angles either predetermined or random so the other can practice basics of footwork, zoning, hitting, etc. can be done in any range.

These are only three, I'm getting tired of typing already. i'll explain more later if your interested.

Andy
 
Originally posted by Lunumbra

I'm looking for a good source to learn some of the vocabulary associated with FMA's

for instance, in my limited experience, Kali, Escrima and Arnis are used almost interchangably as the name of art forms. Are there different emphasis placed on each name?

What is Tippi-Tappi?

If someone could just give a brief description of each common excercise, it would be a great help to all of us beginners in following the posts around here!

Thanks
Michael Stone

1. The Eskrima-Digest has one of the largest vocabulary lists:
http://www.martialartsresource.com/filipino/filframe.htm

Scroll down to the "Instructors in Filipino Martial Arts" link and then scroll down to "FMA Glossary of Terms."

2. Kali, Eskrima, and Arnis are general terms used to describe the Filipino martial arts. In recent years some Filipino martial artists have argued that "kali" describes an ancient art from which the various more modern styles of "eskrima" and "arnis" have derived. Mark Wiley in "Filipino Martial Culture" argues that this is not the case. The dozens, if not hundreds, of different Filipino martial arts, both weapons-oriented and not, are tied to tribal, clan, and family traditions that are so dissimilar as to prevent any association with a common "mother" art. Furthermore, prior to the 16th century, "kali" was not a term used in the Philippines to describe martial arts; it is a 20th century term that is often used out of a sense of Filipino pride and the desire to promote Filipino martial arts.

This is stating his argument rather broadly as he admits that "kali" could well be in many cases a derivation of longer words from different dialects that describe individual Filipino tribal arts; there may very well be a connection also between "kali" and the Hindu goddess "Kali." The central argument described above is however not effected by these considerations
Wiley prefers to take each Filipino art on its own merits and to discuss them in terms of (1) whether they are an "ancient," "classical," or "modern" tradition, and (2) the various "systems," "styles," and "techniques" within each type of tradition.

3. "Tapi Tapi" is a drill designed to build sensitivity, especially with the non-stick hand that monitors and checks the opponent's stick while simultaneously defending and attacking with your stick. Doce Pares has a version, and I believe that Remy Presas' Modern Arnis has one as well. Pekiti Tirsia has "tapping," which is similar in intent even though it looks different from the above.

Tapi Tapi can admit to several variations. For example, the Saavedra family used tapi tapi as a a form of controlled sparring at close quarters that emphasized the use of the empty hand to monitor and control the opponent's weapon. Later, Momoy Canete, who wished to emphasize espada y daga technique in his interpretation of Doce Pares, created a more aggressive role for the dagger, which could now be used both to monitor and control an opponent's weapons as well as to attack the opponent with thrusts.

Best,

Steve Lamade
 
Excellent, thanks guys.
Just what I was looking for....

Lunumbra
 
Theres a few more bits and peices as well. For example I think that

Lago y Mano meaning Long Arm is trying to distance yourself from your opponant while still cuasing maximum damage.

Hougat is close quarters combat and is more about not using force against your opponant.

Abesadario is a number of strikes and blocking techniques while Box Pattern is a harder more complicated version.

8 count is as stated before but in Kali we have to do to a beat with rythem.

Abbinicho is the fan motion with the weapon or blade in hand.

Heaven Standard and Earth is the same pattern of attack but it goes from high into medium into low.

Numerado is a more complicated form of all the above but you have to deal with more pokes and jabs instead of slashes etc with the blade. This is similar with most of Kali because the more advanced you get the more jabs you end up dealing with rather then slash.

Thats all Kali so it may differ from Arnis and Escrima.


:asian: :asian:
 

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