Do you study different versions of your forms from other styles?

SahBumNimRush

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I'm curious if any of you study other versions of your forms from other styles?

I find studying the same form from different systems provides insight and a deeper appreciation of the form. Rather than being a "form collector" delving into a deeper understanding of the core forms that I was taught has provided significant enrichment in my training.

Our Core Forms are:

Kicho Hyung 1-3

Pyung Ahn Hyung 1-5

Bassai

Naihanchi 1-3

Chinto

Kong Sang Kun

I also practice: Seisan, Jion, Shipsoo, Wanshu, and Rohai.
 
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SahBumNimRush

SahBumNimRush

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For reference, here is a video of my performing Kong Sang Kun/Kushanku/Kanku/Kosokun earlier this year.

 

Hot Lunch

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I went from Shorin-ryu to Shotokan. With Shorin-ryu, I have all three Naihanchis and all five Pinans. In Shotokan, I have all five Heians and the first two Tekkis (Pinans are senior to Naihanchis in Nakazato lineage Shorin-ryu, where the opposite seems to be the norm everywhere else).

But what I can say is this: I find it beneficial to study other styles versions of your katas, for one important reason: if you don't understand the bunkai of a particular step in your kata, it will likely be obvious in at least one other style's version of it. There were some bunkai that I didn't understand in Shorin-ryu that became clear to me when I got to Shotokan. At the same time, I also found myself explaining bunkai that I knew from Shorin-ryu that no one at the Shotokan dojo knew.
 

Dirty Dog

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Our primary forms are the Palgwae. We teach them in their original form, but I do find the changes others have made interesting.
 
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SahBumNimRush

SahBumNimRush

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But what I can say is this: I find it beneficial to study other styles versions of your katas, for one important reason: if you don't understand the bunkai of a particular step in your kata, it will likely be obvious in at least one other style's version of it. There were some bunkai that I didn't understand in Shorin-ryu that became clear to me when I got to Shotokan. At the same time, I also found myself explaining bunkai that I knew from Shorin-ryu that no one at the Shotokan dojo knew.

I very much agree. Some forms vary greatly between systems, while others remain very similar. Overall, the general theme of the formset is presented through each system, which IMHO, helps reinforce the underlying principles of the formsets.
 
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SahBumNimRush

SahBumNimRush

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Our primary forms are the Palgwae. We teach them in their original form, but I do find the changes others have made interesting.
I am not very familiar with the Palgwae poomse. I know many of the original TKD black belt Poomse underwent some changes. I.e. the original Koryo looks very different than the modern iteration of Koryo. I only learned a couple of black belt poomse back in the 90's when I competed in USTU events. We learned them from the state coach and had VHS tapes to reference. I admit, I only knew them at a very superficial level.

I can imagine by what I have seen of the original Koryo vs the new version, that the Palgwae would have more "functionality" to them?
 

Dirty Dog

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I am not very familiar with the Palgwae poomse. I know many of the original TKD black belt Poomse underwent some changes. I.e. the original Koryo looks very different than the modern iteration of Koryo. I only learned a couple of black belt poomse back in the 90's when I competed in USTU events. We learned them from the state coach and had VHS tapes to reference. I admit, I only knew them at a very superficial level.

I can imagine by what I have seen of the original Koryo vs the new version, that the Palgwae would have more "functionality" to them?
I practice Palgwae, Taegeuk, Chang Hon and the KKW Yudanja forms. They all have a great deal of functionality to them. The biggest difference is the Taegeuk forms, which were clearly designed to fit the KKW view that 1st Dan is a beginner rank, attainable by kids after as little as 1 year. As far as Koryo goes, it's not really a revision. It's more like they tossed it and just kept the name.
 

Bill Mattocks

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We practice several versions of Sanchin. The Isshinryu version, a version known as the "Gojuryu version" (which actually isn't), and an actual Gojuryu version.

We have had visitors from Japan and Okinawa who have taught us other kata from their styles and we enjoyed trying to learn them, but it's not a common thing.

We are also a Tokushinryu Kobudo dojo as well as as learning Isshinryu weapons, so we do practice both. I am not a Tokushinryu student, but I've picked up a few of the weapons katas over time.

Learning new katas are fun and instructive.
 

HighKick

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I'm curious if any of you study other versions of your forms from other styles?

I find studying the same form from different systems provides insight and a deeper appreciation of the form. Rather than being a "form collector" delving into a deeper understanding of the core forms that I was taught has provided significant enrichment in my training.

Our Core Forms are:

Kicho Hyung 1-3

Pyung Ahn Hyung 1-5

Bassai

Naihanchi 1-3

Chinto

Kong Sang Kun

I also practice: Seisan, Jion, Shipsoo, Wanshu, and Rohai.
Very cool question, Sir.
We have a long time Shotokan school in our area and we regularly cross-train with each other. I was surprised to discover how similar their Heian forms and our Pinan (Pyong Ahn) forms are. Their Bassai has the same pattern of movements but, of course, are performed differently in mechanics.
Chinto and Hansoo have several similarities, but the pattern is different. Seisan, wow. The balance form. Our GM never did it very often. Just one of those forms e does not like for some reason.
All the other forms we practice regularly. MDK TKD.
 

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