Do you have a story on using BJJ in a REAL situation?

sli

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I would love to learn BJJ someday. I have been reading books, watching video, and visiting BJJ schools that teach “SPORT” BJJ.
We all know that BJJ is a must-have in a UFC fight (with rules and referees to protect fighters).
But I am not so sure “SPORT” BJJ alone is enough in a real fight or self-defense situation since “SPORT” BJJ has only one opponent and no striking involved. Please do not turn this thread into a hate mail. That was my observation.
Did any of you use BJJ in a REAL situation (not including any arranged fights)?
May I have the details account? Thanks.
i.e. Who did you fight? Why? How did it go from stand-up fighting to ground fighting? Did you know you are dealing with only one person? How did it end (i.e. ran away, called police, Â…)? What did you learn? etc...
 

Tez3

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I think it's a common misconception that you need BJJ in the UFC (you need MMA if fighting in the cage/ring). This came about when the Gracies became involved. I haven't used BJJ in a real life situation, used a few other things though. I think others will tell you the best places to go for self defence classes better than I can.
 

zDom

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Well, not BJJ, but I DID use similar techniques learned from my hapkido instructor.

Do you care to hear about it?
 

arnisador

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Where I study BJJ we practice it mostly as a sport so as to isolate the grappling aspects, but the instructor frequently demonstrates where the strikes are and how to do them from the position you're in. The 'sport' aspect is more important than you might think: Imagine how good a boxer you'd be if you had to practice it by sparring a wrestler every time. You'd need to go boxer-to-boxer improve your specific boxing skills. It's the same with grappling.

You do need to mix them some times. But 'sport' systems like (kick)boxing, wrestling, Judo, BJJ, etc., are some of the best, because you practice against a live, resisting opponent. Don't look too harshly on 'sport' systems!
 

MJS

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Thank you, just never heard that term before.

No problem. :) This art really sparked my interest when the first UFC debuted back in '93.

Mike
 

Tenguru

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I think it's a common misconception that you need BJJ in the UFC

You are correct. You do not need BJJ to compete in the UFC, especially if you plan on being submitted.
 

Tez3

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You are correct. You do not need BJJ to compete in the UFC, especially if you plan on being submitted.


Mmm, Trad Juijitsu and Judo will do as nicely. What do you actually think BJJ is then? Yes it's called Brazilian as they do a form of JJ over there as famously done by the Gracies but you will find there's no 'new' moves in there that Judoka and Trad JJ people won't know or be able to do.
 

Marvin

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Mmm, Trad Juijitsu and Judo will do as nicely. What do you actually think BJJ is then? Yes it's called Brazilian as they do a form of JJ over there as famously done by the Gracies but you will find there's no 'new' moves in there that Judoka and Trad JJ people won't know or be able to do.

Not entirely correct. Since judo's focus has become on getting the ippon, the ground work has decreased a bit, a lot of judoka don't now much ground work at all (this is changing because of the popularity of bjj. The techniques are there, but the judoka just don't rep them as much as the they do techniques in the clinch/throw area. Now traditional jj is not very similar to bjj at all, lot more stand up techniques, mostly straight arm locks and wrist locks from standing, the ground work is more of using the wrist or arm lock to put the person on the ground, not much resistance from your training partner, again this is changing because of the popularity of mma.
 

The Kidd

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To answer your original question, yes I have used it. I work in a school and one of the kids attacked me, we went to the ground, I did not want to strike him and do alot of damage (especially to my pocket book) so being on top of him (in a side mount) I put him in a key-lock (a shoulder lock) and he went from yelling he was going to kick my butt and kill me to rather cooperative in no time.
 

Kenpojujitsu3

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Not entirely correct. Since judo's focus has become on getting the ippon, the ground work has decreased a bit, a lot of judoka don't now much ground work at all (this is changing because of the popularity of bjj. The techniques are there, but the judoka just don't rep them as much as the they do techniques in the clinch/throw area. Now traditional jj is not very similar to bjj at all, lot more stand up techniques, mostly straight arm locks and wrist locks from standing, the ground work is more of using the wrist or arm lock to put the person on the ground, not much resistance from your training partner, again this is changing because of the popularity of mma.

Depends on which "ryu" of "traditional" Ju Jitsu you study and where you study it as this is not the case at all in what and/or how I studied prior to even hearing about or seeing BJJ. A VERY false assumption.
 

Marvin

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Depends on which "ryu" of "traditional" Ju Jitsu you study and where you study it as this is not the case at all in what and/or how I studied prior to even hearing about or seeing BJJ. A VERY false assumption.
I can only take your word for this, as all of JJJ that I have seen did not look very much like bjj. I would be interested in what "ryu" had the same type of ground work as bjj, I have never claimed to have seen everything under the sun (just quite a bit of it :) ). Thanks
 

arnisador

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My experience with JJJ has overwhelmingly been of the stand-and-arm-lock/throw variety. I don't doubt there are styles with extensive groundwork--after all, that's how we got Judo (and hence BJJ!). But, my experience has been that a typical JJJ system has that material de-emphasized if present at all...but as noted, the current situation has resulted in a change of emphasis in many places.
 

matt.m

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I am with Tez3 on this. You all do understand that the stuff you see the Gracies do is nothing more than Judo groundwork for the most part. True Kodokan Judo is extremely effective and noted for not only its kazushi (ippon) mentality but it is in no way shape or form weak in ground work.

Helio learned from a Japanese man that had certified dan ranking from Jigoro Kano. BJJ is just an offshoot of Judo, judo as a sport and not art. Sorry, if you question this then read the history of BJJ in the BJJ Encycolpedia. Three volumes all about the gracies.
 

Rook

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I can only take your word for this, as all of JJJ that I have seen did not look very much like bjj. I would be interested in what "ryu" had the same type of ground work as bjj, I have never claimed to have seen everything under the sun (just quite a bit of it :) ). Thanks

Mostly, BJJ is judo groundwork practiced in a very focused and organized manner. Virtually all judo groundwork came from Maeda, who was a JJJ instructor as well as a judo expert. Virtually all Judo newaza originated within the now-extinct Fusen ryu system of jujutsu. I suspect that as you look more into the history of the ryus, you will find them much more diverse than they first appear, even though there is a great deal of overlap between individual systems. Also, sometimes the traditions themselves have been influenced by modern practices (for instance, judo breakfalls have a strange tendancy to show up in systems in which they are not traditional because most boys in Japan have some training in judo at school).
 

Tez3

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I am with Tez3 on this. You all do understand that the stuff you see the Gracies do is nothing more than Judo groundwork for the most part. True Kodokan Judo is extremely effective and noted for not only its kazushi (ippon) mentality but it is in no way shape or form weak in ground work.

Helio learned from a Japanese man that had certified dan ranking from Jigoro Kano. BJJ is just an offshoot of Judo, judo as a sport and not art. Sorry, if you question this then read the history of BJJ in the BJJ Encycolpedia. Three volumes all about the gracies.

My instructor is an old style Judoka, the judo and juijitsu he teaches is very effective on the floor! I believe, from reading stuff on another forum, that modern Judo had been altered a lot to make it more spectator friendly for the Olympics which a great many deplore. I can understand I suppose as the groundwork we do, as in MMA may be a bit boring for uninformed spectators who want to see flashy throws etc.
 

matt.m

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My instructor is an old style Judoka, the judo and juijitsu he teaches is very effective on the floor! I believe, from reading stuff on another forum, that modern Judo had been altered a lot to make it more spectator friendly for the Olympics which a great many deplore. I can understand I suppose as the groundwork we do, as in MMA may be a bit boring for uninformed spectators who want to see flashy throws etc.


Just as TKD has been hit on. Really though, Judo-True Kodokan Judo has ever bit as much ground work as stand up. GGM Park and GGM Shin as well as He-Young Kimm, who were all students at the Korean Yudo Academy have been noted as saying the same thing.

I was talking last week with a sixth dan friend of mine who I trained under for a year, he said and I quote "MMA, BJJ, is great for one thing; showing the need for ground work. For that purpose it has done a wonderful job."
 

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