Competition Team Training Regimen

bestUSAtkd

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Hello,

My apologies if this topic has been discussed previously. I did a search, and wasn't able to find anything. I have a brand new school (3 months old actually) and am forming a competition team. All of my competitors are new to taekwondo now, but I want to get them started on the right foot. The problem is that in my competition days (80's and early 90's) I never had any sort of a dedicated training routine. In fact, I kind of just did the best I could along with teaching every class, cleaning the dojang, signing people up, even replacing a roof, right in the middle of trying to train for my first US Open. You know, old school.

Any way, I'd like to create a high caliber training experience for my athletes, and I'd very much appreciate any input you all might have.

Thanks in advance.
 

Thousand Kicks

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How new to TKD is new? If you've only had your school for 3 months I would assume you are talking no more than yellow belts. The biggest problem your going to run into is your students not having a strong enough foundation in TKD to train effectively in Olympic style sparring.

My advice would be to stick with basic kicking and combinations and focus a lot of attention on building strength, endurance, and fast twitch muscles. Once your students have a solid foundation the real training can begin.


I always built classes around a concept or technique. So, If I want to work on counter roundhouse, all my drills would include a counter roundhouse for that class.


Hope that helps
 

Archtkd

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Hello,

My apologies if this topic has been discussed previously. I did a search, and wasn't able to find anything. I have a brand new school (3 months old actually) and am forming a competition team. All of my competitors are new to taekwondo now, but I want to get them started on the right foot. The problem is that in my competition days (80's and early 90's) I never had any sort of a dedicated training routine.
Thanks in advance.

I'd give the school at least three years before thinking of creating a good competition team. You will need that time (and much more) to develop a good foundation and a dojang that can support a competion team. Just my 5 cents worth. Competition teams are often loss leaders.
 

skribs

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Along those lines, you can groom people for competition team by encouraging good conditioning and speed, as well as practicing sparring drills and always pushing them to have well-rounded sparring techniques.
 

Gorilla

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If your knowledge is from the 80's and 90's a lot has changed. I would suggest that you go to as many local tournaments as possible and observe. If you are WTF go on Dartfish and watch some fights. Try to arrange a visit to observe local comp team. It is important that you upgrade your knowledge before you start tournaments otherwise this could cause a lot of frustration.


http://dartfish.tv/usat

http://www.dartfish.tv/ChannelHome.aspx?CR=p1
 
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