Competition Judo

F

Field Cricket

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Good afternoon!

Last night I had my first opportunity to watch a Judo competition (in the Commonwealth Games). And to say the least I wasn't that impressed with it.

My major gripe was that the referee would call matte the moment the players were on the floor and weren't making large movements (like one of them was trying for a strangle). The other was that ippons were being awarded for simply pushing an opponent over and rolling over him/her[1]. I was under the impression that a recognized technique had to be completed for this to happen. :confused:

What do other people think? Have I been told a load of rubbish in my Judo classes? Or is it that this particular competition simply has poor referees?

FC

[1] - And I do literally mean pushing the opponent over. Not one of them could have been classified as tani otoshi, (k)ouchi gari, (k)osoto gari, morote gari, etc.
 
I think Kosen Judo addresses this groundwork issue. On this board jeffbeish has posted about making sport judo more interesting.

Judo players have never seemed very interesting in groundwork, it seems to me.
 
Originally posted by Hollywood1340

Never done mat work with a Judo player, sir?

I was submitted by an armbar with 2 seconds to go in my first judo tournament.

But my impression remains that most judoka have little interst in it.
 
Originally posted by arnisador



I was submitted by an armbar with 2 seconds to go in my first judo tournament.

But my impression remains that most judoka have little interst in it.

It appears to me to come in cycles or follow fads. At times Judo players do a lot of newaza for a few years then return to tachiwaza and so on. Also, IMHO, most competitors train only in a few techniques that suit their desires so they miss a lot of Judo. Arm bars, chokes are very fast winning techniques, but most don't bother learning them. I have seen Robey Reed stand in position after hajimae is called and his opponent reach out for him only to find himself in a standing arm bar -- then tapping out. It used to amuse those of us who saw it coming.
 
Originally posted by Hollywood1340

I hate it when that happens :mad:

Im not sure but it seems to me todays Judo competitor lacks the fundamental Judo tactics and methods we were taught at basics 40 or 50 years ago. When I was to become shodan, a rank that signifies the person is ready to pursue study of the art of Judo, then we were required to demonstrate the entire go kyo no waza and all the standard newaza techniques. Newaza included kansetsu waza and shimi waza. I said to be able to demonstrate these techniques. We were required to demonstrate them left and right, including newaza techniques as well.

A little history: SHODAN (1st dan or degree black belt) indicates that the student is sincere in following Judo (gentle way). It is the first serious step on an endless path of discovery and inquiry.

When we would engage in randori practice of all techniques would eventually be done in a matter of weeks. After all, randori is not combat, but the practice of techniques in a controlled environment kata. There is a place for contest randori and for randori no kata. IMHO, competitors lack the skills to accomplish this task. They practice their favorite techniques over and over until they are highly skilled at only a few things. I think those who have a well-rounded syllabus in their practice will turn out to be better competitors in the long run. Could be wrong, but think otherwise.
 
Originally posted by jeffbeish



It appears to me to come in cycles or follow fads. At times Judo players do a lot of newaza for a few years then return to tachiwaza and so on. Also, IMHO, most competitors train only in a few techniques that suit their desires so they miss a lot of Judo.

I'll go along with this, but it still leaves the question why the referee(s) are not enforcing the rules. If the two competitors don't want to fight on the floor they can stand up; but if they've gone to ground they should be allowed to continue fighting.

Arm bars, chokes are very fast winning techniques, but most don't bother learning them. I have seen Robey Reed stand in position after hajimae is called and his opponent reach out for him only to find himself in a standing arm bar -- then tapping out. It used to amuse those of us who saw it coming.

:D That's more like what I want to see - the use of skill and cunning! :D

FC
 

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