Choosing the right one available

Hornviper

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Hello everyone,
At the moment I live in a pretty small town and there aren't a lot of martial art schools. There are only four. So here are my options: Judo, Aikido, Karate and Wing Chun. I have to say that I am 23, and I've done a bit of Krav Maga. I am very, very far from being an expert, though. I know I am old, but I'd like to give one of them a try. It's all about self defense, I don't want to compete. It's too late for that anyway. Most people say none of the above mentioned will do for me, but I am not entirely sure if that's true.

Thank you.
 
I would suggest visiting each school, watching them train and choose the one that interests you the most.
 
First of all, when you consider there are people in their 80s still practising those arts, 23 is but a child by comparison. Second, all 4 of the arts you mentioned can be used for self-defence as long as you are training for it. What you need to do is go to the schools and check them out, and ask what their intention is. Judo and Karate can either be taught for self-defence or competition, and if you are wanting a more self-defence orientated training you need to know that going in.

One of the great things about Martial Arts is that it is a life-long pursuit. It's not like other sports where you give up when you reach 40. With Martial Arts you can practice them until the day you die if that's what you want, so you're never too old to start.
 
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Figuring out which schools offer better quality instruction is important...and that info is not available to the board.
 
Where do people get the notion that if they are older that about 8, they are too old to begin training in martial arts? It's really weird!
 
Where do people get the notion that if they are older that about 8, they are too old to begin training in martial arts? It's really weird!
I don't know. Most people think that I might not be able to learn much because I am 23 years old. Some say people my age are likely to quit, but I think the same thing holds true for some of the teens out there. Young kids probably learn faster, and I will probably need 10 years to move up in the world. I am still willing to give it a try.
 
Age means nothing.

We have a good friend who started when he was 22 years old (he is 25 or 26 now) He travels and competes with us every chance he gets.
 
I don't know. Most people think that I might not be able to learn much because I am 23 years old. Some say people my age are likely to quit, but I think the same thing holds true for some of the teens out there. Young kids probably learn faster, and I will probably need 10 years to move up in the world. I am still willing to give it a try.

Screw what other people think. If you want to do this then the only person stopping you, is you.
 
I don't know. Most people think that I might not be able to learn much because I am 23 years old. Some say people my age are likely to quit, but I think the same thing holds true for some of the teens out there. Young kids probably learn faster, and I will probably need 10 years to move up in the world. I am still willing to give it a try.
You are not old!!!!

If you are interested in training, then my god, go do it. Anybody might quit at some time, regardless of age. But anybody might not quit, and might become very good, and if you are interested and enjoy it, then do it.
 
Most people think that I might not be able to learn much because I am 23 years old.
I don't know what percentage of people might think such a think, but it's a very silly idea. It's true that you've probably missed your window if you wanted to be in the Olympics, but 99.99% of people have no realistic shot at that no matter how young they start.

Many of the frequent posters on this forum are 2 or 3 times your age and many of us have been training longer than you've been alive. In addition, many folks here didn't start training until they were significantly older than you are now. I certainly hope our ability to learn doesn't vanish by age 23!

In regards to the original question, here's what you do:

Visit each of the four schools available. Watch a class or two. If a free or discounted trial class is available, give it a try. Talk with the instructors, Get as much information as you can regarding their schedules, fees, training philosophy, teacher qualifications, and so on. Then pick the one with classes that realistically fit with your schedule, tuition that realistically fits with your budget, that has an atmosphere you think you'll enjoy, and a teaching style which fits with your personal approach to learning. It doesn't matter if a school has the best instructor in the best martial art in the world - if you don't enjoy it, can't afford it, or can't fit it into your schedule, then you won't show up for training and you won't get good at it.
 
I know I am old, but

I should be so old! I have a friend who started competing when he was ten years older than you, he was in 6 UFCs, his career was necessarily shorter than many younger than him but he still got to compete. His shortcomings were nothing to do with his age, more his temperament lol.
I think starting training in your twenties is actually a good time to start, hopefully more mature than a teenager, not likely to damage growing bones, muscles, tendons etc and have the capacity to train hard.
 
I should be so old! I have a friend who started competing when he was ten years older than you, he was in 6 UFCs, his career was necessarily shorter than many younger than him but he still got to compete. His shortcomings were nothing to do with his age, more his temperament lol.
I think starting training in your twenties is actually a good time to start, hopefully more mature than a teenager, not likely to damage growing bones, muscles, tendons etc and have the capacity to train hard.

Good to know. Thank you.
 
Honestly I would personally recommend Judo due to its toughness and practicality.

That said, it really comes down to doing what you enjoy doing. Getting thrown around like a rag doll isn't for everyone.
 
Where do people get the notion that if they are older that about 8, they are too old to begin training in martial arts? It's really weird!
Where do people get the notion 20's or 30's is old!

20's is a great time to start training.
Doesn't matter what you train...it does matter how you train.
Visit the schools talk to the instructors and some of the students. Take a couple of trial classes if possible. Get a feel for how the instructors and students interact with each other and is is a respectful attitude with everyone working hard but having fun. If you don't feel comfortable you won't train there for long.
All the best and have fun doing it.
 
It's all about self defense, I don't want to compete.
Self defense may be your goal, but sport can be your path. If

- your opponent's 20 punches cannot hit your head, or
- you can use single leg to take your opponent down 7 times in a role,

you will know that you have developed something for your self-defense.
 
Of your list of : Judo, Aikido, Karate and Wing chun, I think that the ones that would work best are : Judo, Aikido, Karate and Wing Chun.

Any of the above would work, if you put time, concentration and persistence into it, though each may get you to where You specifically want to go in a different time frame. Quickest path to self-defense competency, imo is judo, but it's by nature got competition all the day, every day in class, though it's typically low-intensity, full of laughing and generally a lot of fun. In a good school.

I'll let the WC guys comment on speed of efficacy in WC training time, I've no clue.

My fave, aikido, is probably the longest. With karate... it's probably school and instructor dependent, but that's really everywhere. In my aikido school, we go tactical as soon as I can show someone howa a principle translates into real world, so I'm weird that way compared to a "traditional" Hambu style, or most other, schools.
 
And keep an open mind about competition.

Your primary focus can be self defense... while using competition to spar against people you would otherwise never get a chance to. Also it is good for networking.
 
And keep an open mind about competition.

Your primary focus can be self defense... while using competition to spar against people you would otherwise never get a chance to. Also it is good for networking.

and it's fun! :)
 
I don't know. Most people think that I might not be able to learn much because I am 23 years old. Some say people my age are likely to quit, but I think the same thing holds true for some of the teens out there. Young kids probably learn faster, and I will probably need 10 years to move up in the world. I am still willing to give it a try.
Well then most people you talk to are stupid
 
I honestly thought you were being sarcastic about the age thing....honestly I don't see how anyone could think 23 is to old...sure some people start training when they're 4 when mummy and daddy drive them to class to get some peace and quiet but not everyone if that was the case why would they bother doing adult classes everywhere would just run classes for children then when they're 20 say oh sorry you're to old to train now off you go grandad.

If you want to train then train and do whatever you want
 

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