Choosing the right martial art for me?

Yassine262626

White Belt
Joined
May 30, 2015
Messages
8
Reaction score
0
Hello everyone, How are you doing?

Recently, I've become interested in learning a martial art, but I need to know which martial art works best for me..
I'm looking for an art for selfdefense and which I can use in a street fight, also I'm interested in learning and discovering the culture and the history of the chosen art.

So, please, what are your suggestions for an art with such specifics? Thank you very much :)
 
OP
Y

Yassine262626

White Belt
Joined
May 30, 2015
Messages
8
Reaction score
0
What martial arts interest you so far?

I'm very interested in Karate, I dont know why but something tells me that it's the right choice for me.. the problem is that I dont know if Karate can provide what I mentioned above and if there is another martial art that can provide that for me better than Karate.

I'm sorry if I didn't explain clearly, it's because English is not my native language.
 

drop bear

Sr. Grandmaster
Joined
Feb 23, 2014
Messages
20,784
Reaction score
5,663
Yeah a good karate will do that. I like kyokashin. (however that is spelt)
 

Kan Ryu

Yellow Belt
Joined
May 7, 2015
Messages
24
Reaction score
9
Location
London, England & Copenhagen, Denmark
Hi there!

I am fine, thank you.

As Drop Bear's answer reflects, it is a vast question to ask.

However, when you say "an art" and "learn the culture and history", it seems like a traditional martial art would be something for you.
But again, there are many traditional arts still in practice today.
So, you need to go out there and have a look...

Here are some words to get you going:

Kung Fu/Wushu - Martial arts of China
Kalaripayattu - Traditional art of Kerala/India
Kobudo - Old martial way of Japan
Bukijutsu - Traditional weapon arts of Japan
Koryu - Old martial school of Japan
Ninjutsu - The art of the ninja

Obviously, there are many more, have a look out there, something will stick out to you, I am sure.

Gambatte ne!

Kan Ryu.
 
OP
Y

Yassine262626

White Belt
Joined
May 30, 2015
Messages
8
Reaction score
0
Okay, drop bear, from what I saw, Kyokushin style consists on aiming the kicks mainly to the lower part of the body and on taking hits and then hitting back, not avoiding them. Is that true? (apologies to all the Karateka if I got something wrong)
Can I also ask what's the difference between Kyokushin and Shotokan?

Kan Ryu, thanks for your list, Wushu intrigues me tbh.. I guess I'll have to choose between that and Karate.

Thanks guys.
 

Drose427

3rd Black Belt
Joined
Aug 13, 2012
Messages
927
Reaction score
251
Location
USA
Okay, drop bear, from what I saw, Kyokushin style consists on aiming the kicks mainly to the lower part of the body and on taking hits and then hitting back, not avoiding them. Is that true? (apologies to all the Karateka if I got something wrong)
Can I also ask what's the difference between Kyokushin and Shotokan?

Kan Ryu, thanks for your list, Wushu intrigues me tbh.. I guess I'll have to choose between that and Karate.

Thanks guys.

Technically, no.

Thats just the one video, many kyokushin schools do use more movement.

But no worries, you cant know what you havent experienced

Kyokushin and shotokan were founded by two different people, with many idfferent ideas.

The founders were even different ethnicities, different beliefs and mentalitles between the japanese and Korean are arguably why Kyokushin looks so different from most other Karate styles.

Kyokushin was founded by Mas Oyama, a Korean who grew up with MA training, didnt like how Shotokan was so made it "Harder". He was all about fighting, Hard with little soft, feats of strength (look him up and you'll find pics of him assaulting cows....Im not kidding), He put huge focus on hard sparring.

Shotokan was founded by an Okinawan, who wanted to spread Okinawan Karate, so he adapted Okinawan Styles, put a lot of focus on mental and spiritual development as well as physical, took it to mainland Japan where it would be changed even more to make it more accessible to people of all ages and disabilities.

While the two have extremely similar curriculums (aside from kata, different styles do different forms or at least diffrent version of said forms) when you have experienced both in some way you'll see theyre noticably different.

More experienced Karateka can give you more info than I!

As for your OP, it depends entirely on what is in your area and whats available to you.

Judo, TKD, Karate, and BJJ all have traditional schools, who put a lot of emphasis on things like SD, culture, respect, etc.

They also all have sport oriented schools, who put performance at respective comps over the above.

So while you may have one of the above, it may be focused on WTF tourneys for TKDS or Naga (or ADCC, dont know the ins and outs of their tourneys) for BJJ, as opposed to a SD or tradition oriented school.

You need to see whats available to you, check out the schools, and find the one that you like the most.

THe majority of places will let you watch/partake in a class or two to decide if its for you.

ONe thing to keep in mind however,

How you train during class time, should not affect how you spend the rest of your time training.

Just because a kyokushin school doesnt do face punching, doesnt mean you dont have to outside of class.

Just because a BJJ school doesnt do certain techs takedowns or drills, doesnt mean you dont have to outside of class.

If you enjoy a school wholeheartedly, but theres some drill or minor preference their missing, go there.

Its the easiest thing the world to find other Martial Artists willing to do extra stuff, plus you will ALWAYS work harder and more often doing something you truly enjoy than you would doing it out of necessity.
 

Hanzou

Grandmaster
Joined
Sep 29, 2013
Messages
6,464
Reaction score
1,063
I'm very interested in Karate, I dont know why but something tells me that it's the right choice for me.. the problem is that I dont know if Karate can provide what I mentioned above and if there is another martial art that can provide that for me better than Karate.

I'm sorry if I didn't explain clearly, it's because English is not my native language.


Can't really go wrong with Kyokushin if you're going for a karate style.

Don't bother with Wushu if your goal is self defense.
 

K-man

Grandmaster
MT Mentor
Joined
Dec 17, 2008
Messages
6,193
Reaction score
1,221
Location
Australia
Hello everyone, How are you doing?

Recently, I've become interested in learning a martial art, but I need to know which martial art works best for me..
I'm looking for an art for selfdefense and which I can use in a street fight, also I'm interested in learning and discovering the culture and the history of the chosen art.

So, please, what are your suggestions for an art with such specifics? Thank you very much :)
First of all, welcome to MT.

I think you will find people here have different interests and as such you will get a variety of suggestions. You have mentioned you like the idea of karate and I will restrict my reply to that although I am interested in a number of other martial arts.

With karate there are a number of styles but they can be broken down into two groups, those that are focused on sport and those that aren't. Almost all the Japanese styles are sport oriented and almost all the Okinawan varients are not.

The question you need to ask yourself is, "do I want to test my martial art in competition or do I want a more reality based style that is mainly suited to self defence?"

You asked about Shotokan and Kyokushin. Well Shotokan is probably the most popular karate style world wide due to the great promotion it received in its early stages. That and Goju Kai would be the big two. Kyokushin was Mas Oyama's blending of those two styles. He started with Shotokan, thought it wasn't hard enough so swapped to Goju under Gogen Yamaguchi. From there he went on to form his own style of full contact karate. All three of those styles are very much sport oriented. That is not to say that there isn't a lot of other bits and pieces inherent in those styles but if you want to really learn about karate and you are studying one of those styles you will need to do a lot of outside work. I started with Japanese Goju and swapped to the Okinawan style some years back. It is more like the original karate of the early 1900s.

Now we do have a thread that discusses the differences between Okinawan karate and the Japanese styles. Rather than rehash it here I will give you a link.
( Difference between Okinawan and Japanese Karate MartialTalk.Com - Friendly Martial Arts Forum Community )

As to recommendation, based on your criteria, I would be looking at an Okinawan style like Goju Ryu or a Japanese style based on traditional karate, Wado Ryu.

Now, of course, most schools will offer you a free class or two to get a feel for what they teach. I would be searching for some of those before making a final choice. The things I would be looking for are how the teacher interacts with the students, how well the more senior students interact with the less experience ones. I would be asking how much grappling the school provides as in close contact work and I would be specifically asking what sort of self defence training they provide. Remember, self defence is more about not fighting than fighting. ;)

Good luck with your choice.
 

hoshin1600

Senior Master
Joined
May 16, 2014
Messages
2,982
Reaction score
1,423
in the past people went to whatever was in their area. but now with the internet people tend to try and do research before starting. this is a good thing but as someone with no training at all it is very difficult to know one from the other or good from bad. there really is no way for us to give you specific advise. the best advise we can give is go to all the schools in your area, try a class in each one and pick the one you like the best. i could tell you something is the best, but if its not in your area what good is my recommendation.

good luck and have fun testing out the schools. keep us updated on your findings.
 

drop bear

Sr. Grandmaster
Joined
Feb 23, 2014
Messages
20,784
Reaction score
5,663
The question you need to ask yourself is, "do I want to test my martial art in competition or do I want a more reality based style that is mainly suited to self defence?"

No it isn't.

One style isn't sport at the detriment of self defence. That is a massively incorrect assumption.

The elements of self defence will be two factors. Fighting and not fighting.

Fighting will go to the guy who punches and kicks more effectively. Not fighting will go to the mind set and experience of the instructor. So if the instructor has a sensible head on his shoulders he can instill the ability to mostly avoid drama into his students.
 
OP
Y

Yassine262626

White Belt
Joined
May 30, 2015
Messages
8
Reaction score
0
Great answers, really guys thank you.
I know I'm pushing it here, but can someone recommend me some Karate books that deal with the cultural and historical aspect of the art?
 

K-man

Grandmaster
MT Mentor
Joined
Dec 17, 2008
Messages
6,193
Reaction score
1,221
Location
Australia
No it isn't.

One style isn't sport at the detriment of self defence. That is a massively incorrect assumption.

The elements of self defence will be two factors. Fighting and not fighting.
Of course that assumption is yours, incorrect or otherwise. I deliberately did not say that at all. I have no doubt that what you learn in Japanese Karate can be used on the street, hence the thread on Shotokan Karate for self defence that I started. What I said was that one style, Okinawan, was primarily designed and suited for self defence.
 

K-man

Grandmaster
MT Mentor
Joined
Dec 17, 2008
Messages
6,193
Reaction score
1,221
Location
Australia
Great answers, really guys thank you.
I know I'm pushing it here, but can someone recommend me some Karate books that deal with the cultural and historical aspect of the art?
Gichin Funakoshi ... "Karate-do, My way of Life" and "Karate-do Kyohan".
Patrick McCarthy ... "The Bible of Karate - Bubishi".
Kane & Wilder ... "The Way of Kata".
Tetsuhiro Hokama ... "History and Traditions of Okinawan Karate".

Just a few to get you started. :)
 

drop bear

Sr. Grandmaster
Joined
Feb 23, 2014
Messages
20,784
Reaction score
5,663
Of course that assumption is yours, incorrect or otherwise. I deliberately did not say that at all. I have no doubt that what you learn in Japanese Karate can be used on the street, hence the thread on Shotokan Karate for self defence that I started. What I said was that one style, Okinawan, was primarily designed and suited for self defence.

Remember how you say you don't ever style bash? Above is style bashing. At less to the same degree as anybody else. Which admittedly is stuff all.

And it is wrong. If they teach self defence then that is what they are designed to do. And I could jump on a website and guarantee you they teach self defence.

The difference is the method they use to teach self defence.
 

K-man

Grandmaster
MT Mentor
Joined
Dec 17, 2008
Messages
6,193
Reaction score
1,221
Location
Australia
Remember how you say you don't ever style bash? Above is style bashing. At less to the same degree as anybody else. Which admittedly is stuff all.

And it is wrong. If they teach self defence then that is what they are designed to do. And I could jump on a website and guarantee you they teach self defence.

The difference is the method they use to teach self defence.
So what are you argueing? If they teach self defence they teach self defence. What did I say?
I would be asking how much grappling the school provides as in close contact work and I would be specifically asking what sort of self defence training they provide. Remember, self defence is more about not fighting than fighting. ;)
Funny, I might have thought that addressed those concerns.

BTW, what style was I bashing?
 
Top