can anyone tell me how effective bjj is for self defence

Supra Vijai

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Sorry went away from the PC for a bit and Sensei Parker beat me to it :)

I think from the sounds of it, different interpretations of the same sentence is the only issue here. I personally won't argue your last point at all Cirdan about being ready to do harm if necessary, I think you are totally right there and that's a great mindset to have. To me it's part of doing what you have to in order to survive.

The only issue I had was as Sensei Parker mentioned, going into a fight with the preconceived idea of causing as much harm as possible. Pre-empting the fight so to speak rather than going with it (if verbal de-escalation and so on had failed) and acting in the "future" rather than "present"

And yes we do train to cause damage when needed, we just had a workshop dealing with the defensive use of various weapons. We took one principle and applied it to half a dozen weapons in twice as many scenarios, acting as both the good and the bad guys so to speak. Many of the strikes we were doing, if done with proper targeting would be severely damaging to your opponent but at the same time, within the bounds of local laws so we wouldn't suddenly find ourselves arrested for what we thought was self defense
 

Chris Parker

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Hey Cirdan,

Yeah, it's getting into the difference between the meanings of the words, and the implied undertones.... for example, I wouldn't look for the best way to do maximum damage at any point. If I did, it'd be a straight lethal move, quick, simple, done. But, as that is rarely necessary, or even advisable, the first thing I look for is the best way to get away. And against, say, a gun with no demand for cash, just screaming, getting more and more agitated, it may be that lethal responce. It really comes down to the situation.

Your last comments (straight out of Rory Miller's book there, yeah?) should be repeated constantly. Heartily agree.
 

Cirdan

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Indeed Chris, it always comes down to the situation. If you can get away, always take the opportunity. However as much as I value nike-jutsu there is also a very real danger of to getting too attached to the idea mentally. Running might not be an option if you have say a girlfriend or a baby carriage with you.
 

Chris Parker

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Yep, absolutely. (For the record, we teach concepts for these situations, including what we refer to as Buddy Guarding [body guarding principles, designed for people with small children, but can also be used for adult friends], Partner Protection [methods involving engaging someone when with a partner/friend/someone you can't "leave behind".... and also involving things like what you can do if your partner gets in the way!], and more. And even here, the same focus of Get Home Safe applies, it just applies to more than just you!).
 

Cirdan

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Well it is good to train for these things, but a scenario with multiple attackers and someone you have to defend is both extremely hard and chaotic. I would say it comes down to your will and whatever split second choise you make. The rest is academic.
 

xfighter88

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I think we are moving into nitpicking about wording again.. KF penguin mentions heart and the resolve to do harm which I read as the will to survive and do harm if neccecary. Then again english is not my first language.

I will always look for the best way to do maximum damage. Does not mean I will do so but it could be needed the next split second. Attacks happen with far less warning and with greater force than most suspect.

Be kind and smile to everyone you meet but have a plan as to how you would kill them. I forget who said that but it is pretty much how I function. It never hurts to be prepared.
 

elmerq

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hey guys i really want to know how effective bjj is for self defence and what kinds of joint locks, and throws you can do in self defence and i want the names of the techniques.

I've read most of the answers replied in this forum and for the most part they are correct. It does depend on the teacher, it depends on the situation, it depends on how long you've studied the art. Yes it all depends.

But the art as a whole is considered a soft art because it lacks striking, traditionally speaking. However, what the art does provide is opportunity and proper positioning to strike.

Personally, I believe that BJJ is most effective when your ultimate goal is to control and contain. An example would your drunk friend decides to get in a fight with your other drunk friend. You don't want to hurt them, let them hurt each other, or hurt you. This is where I believe this art is most effective.

In self defense scenario, what this art teaches you is to avoid going to the ground and to react properly should the fight go to the ground. For example, great techniques such as avoiding the single leg or double leg tackle, using your legs as defense against the punch in the guard position, or escaping locks.

Althought most believe the BJJ is a ground fighting system, many BJJ legendary artist would still teach throws, escapes, and locks from a standing postition. For example, learning how to implement a proper standing gulluitine maneuver or escaping from it. My advice to you is to practice Randori. Randori is when you wrestle with a partner only from a standing level. At first you wrestle each other to see whole get both arms in a proper position which with be the underarm hug. Then you can add sweeps or throws in the mix.

Is BJJ effective in street fighting? I would say yes and no because the art itself doesn't teach striking, but does teach great fundamentals for proper set up for striking and self defense.

I hope my post helps!
 
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